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Browning

What does this mean? Is there a problem with these stocks, and how would you know if you had one?
 

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Browning

The wood was treated with salt (NaCl), which, overtime with exposure to moisture started to invade the metal of the receiver. Finishes were raised, steel rusted and pitted, etc.

Check out the web site listed above - at the bottom is a link to 'salt wood Brownings' - lots of good info.

Art will know if your gun is one (by serial number).
 

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Browning

I believe it was the people tht furnished Browning with stock blanks that used the salt and not Browning. There was such a demand for good walnut and it takes time to properly dry wwalnut for gun stocks. The people that furnished the stock blanks came up with the process to use salt to remove the moisture from the wood at a faster rate.
Fred Wiedemann
 

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Browning

Salt wood, unfortunately was used on the Superpose O/U Shotgun during the late 60's thru early 70's. I believe it was hit or miss as not every shotgun had salt wood; I had a friend that had one with salt wood and another who did not. Both were made in the same year by FN of Belgium. Look closely at the wood to metal; e.g., the inletting the stock to the receiver for pitting. Another way, I understand, is removing the original recoil pad and check for rusted screws. I've been told that Browning made it right with the owners. Contact Browning and they should be able to determine if the gun has salt wood. These were not made by Meriku in Japan. Darrell
 

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I sent my Browning Broadway back with salt wood. Browning said it was salt wood and would warranty the wood and reciever metal. To make a long story short, after they had the gun 19 months, they discovered an oversized chamber and would only do the warranty work if I paid them $2200.00 to replace the barrels. I told them to return my gun and many 100's of rounds have been fired through that "bad" chamber. An easy way to get out of doing the warranty work.

A disappointed Browning owner in Ky.
 

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Typically S7 and later guns, and those with higher grade woods, not so much in the Grade 1 if I recollect the information from the "Superposed".

Jay
 
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