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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of my trap shooting buddies loaned me his Browning Broadway. Any ideas on engraving? I cleaned it up a little and will shoot just for the experience soon.
Wood Tints and shades Air gun Font Blade
Tableware Revolver Wood Knife Font
Wood Tints and shades Air gun Font Blade

Tableware Revolver Wood Knife Font
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
30 inch barrels
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Don't know who did it but the friend would have a really hard time GETTING IT BACK!!!
My Best
Jim
I'm trying to get them "lost". Maybe I should just tell they went mysteriously "missing", lol. That is some nice engraving.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I attempted to take off the convoluted task of forearm removal. I can get the latch undone, slide forearm forward on the barrel, then remove the barrels. However, the forearm doesn't come off the barrels and being an old gun I don't want to force the wood off the barrel, I'm afraid I'll split the wood. I read where there are two different "detachments "?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Educate yourself. All the Browning manuals are on their website.
I appreciate your suggestion, however, Broadway isn't listed even under discontinued models, unless I'm overlooking something.

I found it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Since this new to me, the one thing I don't understand is the forearm is not to removed. It would drive me insane if I shot this in the rain and couldn't dry and oil this area.

Font Document Terrestrial plant Number
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Charlie, how wide is the rib on that Broadway? What were the grades in Broadways? Was it Lightning Diana and Midas? Could this be a European gun and what a the choke markings?
PDave
Rib appears to be at least a cm wide. It was made in Belgium.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
It's interesting... I went through my copy of the "Browning Superposed", and the BROADway was introduced in '61. Reviewing the multiple engraving options for the 60s, the gun almost has the look of a pigeon and that of a pointer sans the dogs.

Clearly pheasants and waterfowl with scroll on a nice higher grade. Alfonse Marechal is listed on page 210. He was one of a handful of family members noted as engravers. A nicely, more uniquely engraved version of the Superposed from the 1960s.

I own '65 BROADway grade 1, that I put Briley's into in order to shoot Skeet, Sporting and afield for pheasant and dove... great handmade Belgium guns.
I tried to get my buddy to sell it, he no longer shoots, but he isn't interested in selling it. I'm not sure what it is worth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Numbers below top lever:
20011 S73B2. (B2 were small letter and number, I can't make them small)
Barrels are 30 inches
Rib is 1.5 cm wide

Also, someone had Thin wall Briley chokes installed, will this help, hurt, or make no difference in the value?
 

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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
Charlie, don't mean to be negative but anytime you disfigure a grade gun you hurt the value unless whatever was done to it is exactly what a perspective buyer wants. Unfortunately, most buyers don't indicate the desire for the addition.
Unfortunately, that was my thoughts also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Does the gun have any markings on the receiver left side shelf (where the receiver meets the barrels)? I've seen some additional information engraved there on FN guns.
I'll look.
Another question since I'm both neophyte and ignorant, would this be a "salt" gun?
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Salt wood explained

Shotgun Report®
Browning Salt Wood Explained
bcbuck bcbuck
9 years ago
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Dear Technoid,

Please discuss the Browning Superposed salt problem and how to detect this defect. I have not been able to find any reference to it in the shotgun literature.

Bill

Dear Bill,

The best discussion of the Browning salt wood issue is in Ned Schwing’s “Browning Superposed” book (Krause Press, 1996). According to Schwing, in the mid ’60s Browning needed a better supply of high grade walnut for it’s guns. A California contractor had a large inventory of good walnut taken from clearing power line right of ways. Demand for Browning guns was at an all time high and the usual kiln drying process for walnut was too slow to produce what was needed. Rapid kiln drying also produced cracks in the California walnut.

Morton Salt had developed a salt solution drying process successfully used in the furniture industry with good results. This cured the walnut much faster than the kiln method. Browning tested it and there were no problems, so Browning bought the process in 1965. “In an area roughly the size of a football field, five-foot by five-foot by eight-foot stacks of stock blanks were covered with salt. The salt was supposed to leach out the moisture and dry the wood quickly. The process did accomplish its purpose but the moisture that was drawn out of the blanks on top of the stacks ran down into the blanks below, resulting in a brine solution that soaked the lower wood blanks.” (Schwing, pp 246) The retained salt reacted with the gun metal with the finished stock was installed. This caused the rust associated with “the salt wood problem”.

According to Schwing’s interviews with Browning’s Harm Williams and Val Browning, all the salt curing was done in the US and affected at least 90% of all Browning stocks from made from 1967 to 1969. The problem continued to show up until 1972, but in smaller numbers. It was then that the entire supply of walnut blanks was burned and replaced with traditional kiln dried wood.

To detect salt wood on 1966 to 1972 guns, first check for outward appearance of dark or discolored spots. Check every place that wood meets metal, as on the rear of the forend and at the head of the stock. Rust on the metal will be apparent if there is a problem. According to Schwing, the definitive test is to remove the butt pad/plate, scrape away a little wood from the exposed butt and apply a 1% solution of silver nitrate to the fresh wood. If the silver nitrate remains light purple, there is no salt. If the silver nitrate turns white, you have a salt gun.

If you can prove that you are the original owner of the salt gun, Browning used to replace the wood for free and will probably still do so. If you bought the gun used, you are on your own. I got a used Superposed 410 with salt wood some time ago. Browning charged me about $250, if memory serves, to replace the wood. It wasn’t free, but it was certainly a bargain price. I don’t know what the numbers today are.

By the way, Browning wasn’t the only one to get taken in by the salt wood walnut curing process. I’ve heard that some other gun companies did also, but weren’t quite as up front about dealing with it.

Best regards,

Bruce Buck
The Technoid writing for Shotgun Report, LLC
(Often in error. Never in doubt.)

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
I can get the barrels off but I'm stuck on getting the forearm off the barrels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
You better quit monkeying around with that forearm before you crack it.

It stays on.
Stops screwing with the forearm... It stays on the barrels and moves slightly forward and back. If you take the damn thing apart you may never get it back together... please don't mess it up.
No danger of me taking it off unless I'm sure I can do it correctly. The forearm will stay safely snuggled to the barrels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
I'm a big fan of Superposed shotguns and have several, all Grade 1. Nothing of great value but I enjoy shooting them. Two of my guns had salt wood, nicely repaired by Browning with the wood replaced. Unless the wood is removed, there is no visible evidence of the corrosion. But as such, I'm sure their value is diminished although they look and shoot as well as a non-salt gun. My point is that I'm familiar with the issue.

The subject gun of this thread looks suspiciously like a salt gun. Notice the dark wood at the head of the stock where it contacts the receiver and the same where the forend wood touches the receiver. Has this gun been checked for salt wood? I've heard that if the metal hasn't rusted by now, probably no salt. If no salt, then it appears that the wood is soaked with excess oil from lubrication.

Has the wood been removed to see what's going on?
It being a late 1973 gun the likelyhood of salt wood is very, very low. Discoloration at this age can well come from gun oil introgression into the wood.
I called Browning today,they agree, this model should not be a "salt wood". While talking with them, as some of my learned TS.COM colleagues said, leave the forearm wood on unless removed by a gunsmith. I'm not the brightest bulb but I know when to leave well enough alone. However, the design sucksand it still bugs me. Fortunately, I've been married long enough to know to do what I'm told, and when I'm told, what to do . Frustrating but that is life.
 
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