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Hello:
I just got a call from a friend and someone he works with inherited a Browning A5 from his grandfather. I know very little about this gun other than it was designed by John Browning and that it's nickname was a Browning Hump back. I was told that the gun is a 12 gauge semi auto and has a fixed choke.

My friend said the new owner patterned the gun by shooting from a bench rest at 30 yards and the barrel is patterning 6 inches to the right of center. He wants to know what can be done to get this barrel to shoot straight? He also said he shot a practice round of trap with it and he shot poorly.

I highly doubt this person knows much about shooting and the art of patterning. I told my friend to tell his co-worker to place any questions he has on this site.

If a barrel is patterning 6 inches to the right this sounds excessive to me. I suggested that someone else pattern the gun and see how the gun patterns for them to see where it actually shoots? Any ideas, as to my way of thinking either the gun is cast wrong for this particular person, or the barrel was damaged at one time.

Where would be a good starting point with this type of shotgun to start?
Thanks in advance,
Steve balistreri
Wauwatosa Wisconsin
 

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IMHO, You gave the correct advice, have someone else shoot it to double check. I had one like that 50 years ago, Dad tried it-- same thing, brother tried it-- same thing. Bye-Bye to that one. I had no sentimental attachment to it. Ross Puls
 

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Somewhat on the subject ... my sons all shoot pretty much to POA with my pistols. I shoot them 4 " low and 5" left. BUT... I am consistent.
olde pharte
 

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A shotgun may fall over with enough force to bend the barrel a tad! Depending on how or what it hits. I'd check it for straightness to see if the barrel was actually straight. I'd also look for any marks on the both sides of the barrel that may indicate a fall. For what it's worth, John Browning paid attention to details on proper barrels and chokes on his guns.

HAP
 
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