Trapshooters Forum banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,671 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Interested in hearing of any success of Brittney shooting dogs---a few ??s

1--Aprox hunting lifespan?

2--Male or female

3--Training ability

4--Endurance

5--Any other info will help

Thanks-----George
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,754 Posts
One of my hunting partners has run the Brittneys for many years and he does well with them. I'm a GSP guy so there is always that little one-upmanship going on between us.

1. They live to be 14-15 barring unusual problems and are good hunters up to the end. Check into the pedigree a bit though as some lineages are prone to siezures - my pal had one such dog and it did live a long life but it would have siezures in the field every now and then and he had to carry the poor thing back to the truck on more than one occaision.

2. M/F is more a matter of personal choice but they call the females bitches if that helps.

3. They are really smart and train well, great at making the retrieve to the hand. I think of them as clowns because they will do just about any trick to get attention and petting.

4. They are high energy dogs that need lots of excercise. If they get that needed conditioning, few dogs can beat their endurance.

5. Downsides include their coat being a burr magnet that is difficult to clean out when they do get into the nasty stuff. They are fairly small and naturally camo'd so its easy to loose track of them especially when they go on point in the thick stuff. Upsides are that they are solid pointers with good noses and they excell on upland birds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
I raised and hunted Britts for about 20 years,we ran out of good stock and it was a lot of work for only enjoyment returns. That being said I'd be happy to train another one, I had one large male that hunted everything from upland to snows and blues and retrieved it all. He was a great pointer as well and a terrific pal in the house. His offspring was also pretty big, but again a terrific pointer and retriever. I had one female that I hunted she was great at pointing but just did not like to bring the birds back. She would always find them and hold on to them but as soon as you got over to her she would leave it for you so she could continue to hunt. All of them had great noses and were relatively easy to train. I always took them to SD for five days and they hung in there, most reached the age of 12-14 but only hunted until they were 11.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,744 Posts
I agree with the above poster on the dogs qualities. I had 4 and if we still had birds ans I could still tromp around I would have another. Mine performed as well as any dogs we hunted with and they dearly love attention. I guess everyone can say the same. Used a couple of mine for warm weather duck getters as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,278 Posts
I thought Wolfram said it all. Had a Brittany or two for many years. The last one, also my best, almost made 16. He hunted well through the age of 14, actually had to hunt him easy at 13 and 14. Great, great dog and friend. I've ended up with an English setter now and that is some different from the Britts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
Simply to add to the above info, there are both Americam Britts and French Britts - I have the latter and they are the smallest pointing breed. Here is a picture in the house of my two half sisters (7 month old and 3 1/2 year old):





As they say they are "Angels in the house and devils in the field."

My 3 1/2 year old had her best day in the field this past weekend, finding and giving solid points on 5 different covies of Mearn's Quail, and in doing so she covered 13 1/2 miles of line (compared to my 4 miles) via GPS in 3 1/2 hours of hunting; the youngster is only in the learning mode, but hunts well, points, honors points and finds dead birds. They are both keepers!













They live to please and are the best dog friends that can be had. If interested I can put you in touch with the breeder from whom my two came, but there are several good ones out there besides him. Enjoy and you won't go wrong with a Frenchie!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
I'm a French Britt fan also - had American Britt they were good - this one I have is great - the nose is incredible - I'm in upstate NY grouse and woodcock - check out the bird dog thread - the only thing I would recommend is buy from a breeder who's into HUNTING DOGS - you cant go wrong - JM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,357 Posts
Had two male and female. Outstanding hunters and pals. Female was the only dog my wife really liked. Both lived to be 14, died a year apart, broke our hearts. Many good and funny stories about the pair.

You can't go wrong with a Brit.

Surprised Hap hasn't jumped in here as he is a Brit man.

Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,544 Posts
My first bird dog was a Brittany. I was just starting my first job out of graduate school at a small college in SW Michigan. My wife and I moved there in early September, and the pup was born in July, so I'd guess she was about 8-10 weeks old when we got her. She was already pointing bird wings on a fishing line at that age.

There was a retired farmer and his wife who owned a place with about 170 acres, and we rented it while they went to Florida for the winter. It had a lot of pheasant, Bobwhites, and a few grouse on the place. My dog got to go on a lot of walks on the place at a young age. We had our first snow around the first of October, and on one of those walks I saw some pheasant tracks ending in a big grass clump. I walked her downwind of the clump, and when she hit the scent she froze on point. I flushed the bird and she was hooked. I don't remember whether I actually shot a bird for her that fall, but over the next few years she got quite a few and became a pretty good upland dog.

The next spring my wife, the dog, and I were in a canoe on a lake in the Upper Peninsula. A butterfly came by and the dog tried to grab it, but ended up falling in. It was the first time she went swimming, and she did not like it at all. Ever after if a bird involved water she wanted no part of it.

She was very good at finding birds, and holding point until I arrived, but then would flush them (I know, not proper for a pointing dog). She was also good at retrieving cripples, but if it was dead, it was my responsibility - she was off to find another live one. As a youngster she loved to play fetch with a bumper, but once I tried to force-fetch her she wanted nothing more to do with that game.

She was about ten when we moved to Idaho and had a couple more years of hunting. She was about thirteen when I had to put her down with bladder cancer.

She was between thirty-five and forty pounds and a house dog all her life. All my dogs since then have been retrievers, one black Lab and the rest Chesapeakes. I would consider another Brittany if I did more upland hunting, particularly when the weather was warm, but most of my bird hunting now is colder weather, water, and heavier cover. For instance last week a friend and I went out on the Bear River on the last day of duck hunting. It started out at around ten degrees with a lot of floating ice on the river. His Lab was a little reluctant to get in at first, so my Chesapeake Rocky ended up retrieving all of the birds. He didn't mind the cold at all. I might have gotten my old Brittany in once by throwing her in, but she wouldn't have retrieved the bird, and I couldn't have caught her to throw her in a second time. On the other hand I probably would not take Rocky on a warm weather chukar hunt without a lot of water for him to drink or a river to jump in. You should use a dog appropriate to the hunt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,782 Posts
Thanks Don!! I just saw this one so I'll chime in on the Game Wardens good post on the French Brittanies!!

1--Aprox hunting lifespan? What the guys above said but none ever live long enough to suit me!!

2--Male or female. Either but I prefer the females.

3--Training ability. Easiest there is to train in my experience over the years!

4--Endurance. My lil French gurl can hunt the mountains of AZ all day long!!

5--Any other info will help. If you want an outside kennel dog, get a Husky.

Game Warden, I saved the picture of both your great looking dogs! What are their names so I can add that to their pic and my bird dog album? Thanks.

HAP
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
I'm surprised that Gene7777777 from Iowa didn't chime in on this one. I think he still raises French Brits with excellent pedigrees. He's posted some beautiful pictures on here in the past. I would enjoy having one of his if he was closer. I'm on my third Brit now and really enjoy her. Very intense dog and a delight either at home or in the field. 40 pounds of dynamite. I recently took a young friend hunting pheasants and he asked what the electronic collar was for? I told him it was for him because I knew what she was going to do. Enjoy seeing all of your dogs. Cheers, Stu
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
678 Posts
Game Warden

Great post, I have several pictures of my Brittanies on the gundogs thread. Brittanies are all you said and more. Besides hunting my girls go to trapshoots, Bass fishing in the boats and in the kayak, stream fishing for trout and are very appreciative whenever I take them.









 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
All:
What a great thread this has turned into and I couldn't help but add some more! I raised labs when I was younger and loved them for dove hunting, but always wanted a pointer that met my temperament (previous experience with hard charging GSP made my wife and me think all pointers were not the easiest to deal with), so as retirement approached and my interests turned to quail (one time Mearn's Quail hunting in southern AZ and you are hooked - but their habitat is not for the faint of heart and you feel like you have been mountain goat hunting after a great day) I started looking.

I looked at what dogs my fellow peers had (GSP, English pointers, etc.) and a friend turned me on to French Brits and the breeder for which I listed his webpage above. One personal visit with him and his dogs and we were on the list for a pup.

Aunna (my orange and white) is without a doubt everything all have said above - she hunts all day for you and simply wants to please, and when home she is the lover of the house. Since we live in southern AZ and have a pool she spends most of the summer in the pool and is a retriev-a-hollic for a ball or dummy. As for downed birds she goes right to it, ensures that it is caught and dead, maybe brings it back short distance but then it's yours and she's ready to point the next bird.








Well as a retirement gift I asked for a second Frenchie, one from the same dam, but in black and white color; so along came Isis this last summer.





She immediately started pointing every grasshopper in the yard, and is probably got one of the best noses ever. She has a very classy point and during her very first planted chukar experience gave solid points all the way to the shot. She even found a cripple that Aunna missed.





These half sisters have bonded well and are a joy to be around, hunt with and watch. I will say though that if you do get a puppy do expect the typical first year puppy fun as they love to chew and be into everything. But the fun and reward outweighs the few mishaps.





One more week of quail season left, and hoping for one more cool day for one last trip. Enjoy.

Game Warden (Retired with Dogs!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,782 Posts
GW, your words brought me a chuckle or two also!

"I will say though that if you do get a puppy do expect the typical first year puppy fun as they love to chew and be into everything."

Lemme see, two pairs of prescription glasses, one winter coat, two bedspreads, etc. plus two pair of shoes and a back porch that looks like a beaver colony had lunch!!

Yes, I go through all that again for a new French Brittany pup, they are worth it!! Best suited for the rugged AZ hill country, great noses and a strong desire to please!! I love these lil rascals a lot!!

HAP
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
Unfortunately, I don't have a lifestyle YET that accommodates training a dog or very much hunting, but I am a dog lover and I have really enjoyed this post, it's a great read!
Regards,
Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,278 Posts
Hap, Vince's post gets my memory going. Alder hated water but drop a bird in it and he was going swimming. Can't believe the birds he brought back that you thought you missed. He also loved being in the boat fishing and whenever the line went tight he sure got excited wondering what was coming up through the surface. Best dog I ever had, lot's of great memories.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,789 Posts
I love these bird dog threads.

Great pictures Vince. Game warden your French Britts are beautiful.

I was introduced to French Britts by my very good friend Jimmy Ridge. Outstanding bird finders. And amazing endurance. I have three.

Tom Strumk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,754 Posts
Interesting data from the gamewarden on how much ground the dog covers in relation to the hunter. I would have expected the ratio to be even higher but covering 12(+) miles mostly on the run is no small hunt. Glad he got a good day in on the quail!

Still not sure about Vince making bass fishers out of good hunting dogs but they seem to be having a good time at it:)
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top