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How long does it take to break in a new handgun? What is the difference or how do you know its broken in?

I'm not a handgun shooter-shoot less than a 1000 res a year. 3 wheel guns, 3 auto loaders

Phil Berkowitz
 

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I don't recall ever seeing a break-in recommendation for a revolver - at least not from Smith & Wesson. However some autoloading handgun makers do suggest that the gun is not fully broken in until 500 rounds have been fired. Many times, changes in operation you might see are smoother functioning, fewer feed or ejection failures and maybe slightly improved accuracy.

Ed
 

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Anymore all new autoloaders should function right out of the box. By the time you spend a couple of days at the range trying ammo, mags, etc., it should be just fine.
 

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Auto loader at least 250 rounds through it befor you carry it.
Revolver 50 rounds will tell you if timing is right and trigger pull.
 

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Use to be that when you purchased a new auto loading pistol it was ready out of the box.... it was cleaned and assembled That is just not the case now. I took one i was having trouble with
to my gunsmith. He grinned and ask if i cleaned it completely? He said now days they machine them and put them together with out cleaning COMPLETELY .... After he finished cleaning it has worked flawlessly. I had another one just like it in the safe.... I took it apart on my kitchen table and fine metal shavings were all in the action and trigger area.... So i say CLEAN.. and then anywhere from 200-500 rounds will improve reliability dramatically in an auto loader...
With a revolver i say clean and a box of shells and your good to go.... they are pretty much pull the trigger and it will go bang.
 

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Are you talking about action or barrel?

I season the barrel the same as a rifle.

Action-isnt much to worry about with a wheel gun. Make sure you have a little oil in right places and roll. Semi-s as others state, make sure they're clean. A few hundred rounds and the should be running smoother (imperfections and burrs honed).
 

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Phil:

If your concerned about a new CCW auto pistol functioning correctly you may want to use some lapping compound on the rails of the frame, slide and barrel ramp. (600 or 800 grit)

Shooting a hundred rounds or so with your CCW ammo will also tell you if the recoil spring is right for
the ammo being used. There is always the chance of damaging the guns frame if the spring is too light.

Eddie
 

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Les Baer's guns come so gd tight it takes closer to 1000 rounds to break them in. I couldn't pull open the slide using thumb and forefinger when mine was new......I had to bump it open on the front of the slide. Now that it has shot about 5000 rounds it is like sliding on glass. Great guns!
 

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Les Baer's guns come so gd tight it takes closer to 1000 rounds to break them in. I couldn't pull open the slide using thumb and forefinger when mine was new......I had to bump it open on the front of the slide. Now that it has shot about 5000 rounds it is like sliding on glass. Great guns!
I had to do the same thing when I bought my Les Baer Premier ll it was so tight. Totally agree, great gun and a blast to shoot. Very accurate!
 

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I've never paid any attention to break in periods with regards to anything I've ever purchased and have never had any problems because of doing so. I also ignore owners manuals and hardly ever read directions.

Break it in hard!
 

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I've never paid any attention to break in periods with regards to anything I've ever purchased and have never had any problems because of doing so. I also ignore owners manuals and hardly ever read directions.

Break it in hard!
Most quality auto-loaders such as Sig, S&W, Beretta do not require a break-in.
Simply lub and shoot. Revolvers do not require a break-in. An exception would
be Les Baer pistols. They are "hard fit" and usually do require a 200 round or
so break in. I have a Baer and feel he goes over-board on his fitting. When new
it take's a man and a small boy to pull the slide to the rear. In the past 30
years or so, I've owned probably over 40 1911 pistols. One thing I have learned
is their is no connection between price and accuracy. Today, a $800.00
1911 can be as accurate as a $3,000.00 1911. What you get for your $3,000.00
is all forged parts (no metal injection molded parts) and extreme attention
to detail and finish.
 

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For me I put 500 Ball ammo through my new 1911’s.

Revolvers really don’t need a break in. But a hundred flawless shots are required to be sure it’s mechanically sound.
 

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My Sig custom 1911 worked right out of the box, but wasn't broken in until 700 rounds were fired. Then it ran smooth as glass.
 

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And all the barrel break in procedures? You're just wearing out your barrel burning up ammo. Clean it and shoot it.
 

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One thing I have learned
is their is no connection between price and accuracy. Today, a $800.00
1911 can be as accurate as a $3,000.00 1911
Not something you see demonstrated by professional shooters. Most consumers can't shoot a 3000.00 pistol better than a 800.00 one, but be serious now... 800.00 guns capable of setting match records.......An 800.00 gun would have it's cheap parts worn out long before you get to a match with it.

You seen many 1.5" 800.00 1911's ???????? Be serious.

There's little need to break in a pistol barrel. Not enough violence inside that barrel to warrant breaking it in. High intensity rifle cartridges that can start erosion from the first shot fired need broken in.
 

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1.5" at what distance?
 

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Thanks for the non-answer.
 

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If you're a bullseye shooter, slow fire is done at 50 yards, standing, one handed. 25 yards is the "short line" for timed and rapid fire.

50 yards is where Les Baer guarantees his better guns to shoot 1.5" groups from a Ransom Rest or similar test fixture. No guarantee from the shooters' hand.

Most 1911-ish barrels won't do that well from a very rigid barrel test fixture.
 
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