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I have heard for many years that the "Blue Book" is low, I've also heard it's too high. I'd just like to hear from the consensus on here. I personally just think it depends on if you've the buyer or the seller. I would like to hear ours opinions. Any feed back is appreciated! Thanks Don
 

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The used gun market like most used markets it is fluid rising and falling depending on region and the desirability of a given product/model in a given region. The blue book is a reference price guide based on national market trends both high and low at the time they compiled their most recent edition. This approach is the same used by car and boat price guides.

Buying anything used starts with price negotiation, asking and getting are two ends of the neg0tation process. The blue book gives an average price as a starting point for negotiation keeping both buyer and seller from walking into a price negotati0on blind.

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Some say it's only a reference guide at most, some use it as Bible. It really depends on who you're dealing with and use it for their advantages.
 

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Depends on the gun.

On some it's way too high, on some it's way too low.

The market fluctuates WAY too quickly, especially with the internet, for a book that could be nearly a year old to be anywhere near current. The BB was obviously not even in the same solar system accuracy wise at the height of the panic on AR-15 values.

There are also regional fluctuations depending on demand (a slug gun will be worth more in areas where you can only hunt deer with slugs vs areas where you have the option of using a rifle, a 10 gauge would not have too much demand in an arid state with no goose hunting).

Looking up competed auctions on Gunbroker is a FAR better and more accurate way to value a gun.
 

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Auctions aren't necessarily a better price tool, they're just another price tool in the mix. Many times I've seen a gun sell for what I consider over priced by a wide margin, see very few below market deals. Ian is correct prices can and do rise and fall daily .

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Single auctions may or may not be a good barometer, but when you can find a half dozen or more completed auctions in roughly similar condition and average their final sale prices, you come up with a number VERY close to the real world value.
 

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But until we find a better book, this is the most comprehensive publication we got.

It also includes a lot more information other than price.
 
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Most of the time it's spot on. When I worked at Scheels it's what we used to price guns. It's not 100% correct but 95% of the time it is right. The secret is to make sure you are looking at the most current edition. Condition is everything. You have to be honest with yourself and other people when you price guns. I've had many people tell me their guns were in good condition and in reality they looked like the gun was drug behind a truck for two miles. Good luck either way!
 

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While Skeetman is spot on with 6 guns selling for a ave. price on gunbroker,many don't have the time, and many times you only can find one or two current guns to average. So the Blue book is a excellent way to find out. I will not pay more for any gun than the blue books worth. But If I needed or wanted a gun bad enough!!! But, I'd check the auctions and get a fined tune price if I was close the the sellers asking price. And there are several auction houses to check. Need and want are two different animals though, and get many into trouble. break em all. Jeff
 

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All I can say about it is that I wish I could buy guns for the prices listed in it.

Unless a value guide is updated weekly and based upon actual regional selling prices, it isn't accurate. What is in demand where I live may not be where you live - until next week when the scenario might be reversed. In auto value guides, the Black Book is the guide of choice because there are Black Book employees in the lanes at local auctions recording what cars and trucks sold for and what their mileages and conditions were. Every week I went to an auction, I could buy a newly-published Black Book covering my exact area or a weeks or month-old NADA guide that was only an east coast edition, not strictly south-central Pennsylvania.

Yes, it's a decent guide to give you an idea of what a gun might be worth but that's about it.

Ed
 

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Ed's explanation is probably the closest to reality, no question the auto guides are more accurate because they are updated weekly as he points out. I have bought guns that were priced well above the Blue Books value because I knew where that gun was seeded in my market. Other times I have bought way below their listing because the region I bought it from that model didn't command the listed price. I as said, the blue book is a good reference guide a starting point for negotiation, it's also a useful tool when they explain differences in models and types and how they add or detract from value.

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