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Discussion Starter #1
Lenses that block Blue light for sharp contrast were popular years ago but now seem to be at the bottom of the list. After my cataract surgery I'm gonna get some new RX lenses and I think I will order some Blue Blockers that seem to have a Lite Medium Target Orange color. Any comments for or against ??
 

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I got mine from a respected dealer with the assurance that if I did not like them he could bleach out the BB effect.

They turned the target white and it disappeared in similarly-colored clouds. I took them back; the BB could not be bleached out after all; there was no refund policy and I was out several hundred dollars.

Blu-Blockers were invented by a mail-order ripoff company (long-ago J+S, not today's shooting company at all) and were followed to TV by competitors like Sham-Wow, the Pocket Fisherman, and Bassomatic. Think "Yeti" and you will get the drift.

Neil
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, my understanding is that Blu Blocker is a filter not a color. Many years ago I asked Della McClure (Decot Rep) about them and she said that airline pilots had trouble reading the instrument panel with them at high altitude but I didn't know how that related to Trapshooting.
 

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I don't post often, because I feel I don't have anything of value to add to the thread, but in this case, I will share my experience. I currently use Remington T-50 shooting glasses, copper color, which are now discontinued. I purchase them online at outlets and buy 3-6 pair at a time, $5-10 each. I either give them away to those in need, or break them. In order to upgrade to a more traditional appearance, I purchased a set of Decot frames, and took my Remington's to my favorite Decot outlet to get a set of lenses of the "right" color. The vermillion was close but not exact. For me, there is no comparison, the Remington's make the birds almost glow. The Decots subdue the original image. And as a side note, the Remington's cause the displays in my car to disappear, while the Decots leave everything visible. Until such time that I find a suitable replacement, I'm stuck with using the Remington's. And yes, they displays are a blue color. I hope this helps to add a little background information.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Vermillion is supposed to be good for people with red/green deficiency but I have shot my best scores with them on a bright sunny day. They subdue a green background but are too dark for me on a cloudy day.
 

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I am red green blind and shoot white flyer orange targets. Years ago I was introduced to what Decot terms bb-6. They are a blood red color. I use them in all light conditions and they allow me to see the target emerge in "any light condition". For me they turn the target white and there are days when the target will disappear in a sky background. In most instances I am on the target such that I can "sound shoot" it with confidence. For those without a color deficiency a lighter shade (BB-3) is recommended. But it has to be RED. Any other tint such as vermillion does not have the same effect. In fact I ordered them for a birthday present and they came with a slight orange tint. Not the same effect. And I think this is the same situation as a previous poster noted and my memory of the Remingtons is they were RED.
 

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Blu blockers use an amber colored lens. Amber lenses are on the opposite end of the color spectrum from blue and therefore absorb the blue rays. It has nothing to do with anything other than the lens color. As Neil said above, those particular ones are junk.

If you get a pair from a reputable company you are assured the lenses are "optically clear" meaning they are one step below glass lenses.

I am very particular with my eyes and eye protection to the point I can not even stand to look through a water mark on the lens. Drives me nuts. I bought a pair of the browning shooting glasses with the interchangeable lenses and found what worked for me and then I found glasses that fit me in the colors I wanted. They cost maybe $50-60 bucks and they came with 5 different color lenses.

Don't pay attention to the hype. Blu blockers is not a filter. Do some reading on lens colors and don't trust your eyes to a $9.99 pair of glasses.
 

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I got blue blockers years ago against the advice of someone at Decots. They said among other things that they are very fatiguing to the eyes. They were right and I got rid of them.
 

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I still have some Blue Blocker lenses, Mike. Got them from a certain family run optical business that used to shoot trap in Alberta. I liked them. I use precription lenses now from Dr. Laura Winkel. Might ask her if she can do Blue Blockers next time.
 

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I wouldn't shoot without a blue block, gas coatings or in anything other than Trivex lens material. The eye industry still indorses and offers blue blockers in their therapeutic tints. Lens blank manufacturers still impregnate blue filters in permanently colored poly. Its true that about 4% of vision challenged users claim that a blue blocker turn red or orange into white. Great against dark background, crap on cloudy days with sky background. They may also claim blue block is a scam.

BPI Therapeutic Tints

Maltz
 

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Ask to try different glasses of those you shoot with. Yellow, rose, orange type colors always seem to be popular.
You can also get yourself a set of glasses that come with 5 to 7 different lens colors for $50 to $60 which would allow you to try different colors.

It's best to be able to try them on for fit and not order over the internet.

I can't use my favorite pair often because of humidity. In the south Jersey area we often have very high humidity in the summer and many glasses will fog up because they fit to well. On those days I'll use a pair of Beretta glasses which cost about $30 and do the hob quite well.

So depending on where you live you might need/want a couple of different fitting types of glasses plus different shades (day shooting vs night shooting). Where you typically shoot will also play into what color you use. Wooded vs green background vs sky or dirt can all make a difference in the color of the lens.

There is enough difference in ranges and people that you will have to figure this one out on an individual level. Nothing wrong with getting a census of what other people like however as this gives you something to work with.
 

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I've used the Maxx HD sunglasses and found them good for me in the bright sun.
I can see the clay very well. Better than with darker grey lenses. They block the blue too. YMMV.
I'm trying some Knight Visor glasses of Amazon, now and like the yellow pair very well.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01A83YHL6/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
They sent me grey rather than the copper, so those are being shipped to me now free of charge. VG customer service.
They are very clear and sharp. Not bad actually for cheap glasses. They sit off the face a little too, which works great, since I have a cro-magnon brow :)
George
 

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Discussion Starter #16
My Thanks to everyone who replied to this thread. I'm going to shoot this weekend with a plano lens in my right eye and my old RX in my left eye. There is no cataract surgery in the near future for my left eye. I have 4 sets of Decot Hy-Wyd Classic frames and I just threw out about 10 old right eye RX lenses that are of no use to me. The new RX for my right eye is just a slight correction for astigmatism. Depending on how the plano lens works I will probably get one set of new lenses with my new RX for both eyes. I have not yet decided what color but for the past 2 years I got by with Lite Medium Target Orange for most light conditions.
 
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