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Blood lead levels

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Anyone have their blood lead levels checked? I had to request mine to be included with my annual check up. Just curious as all I hear about is lead contaminants for our sport.
I shoot at least twice a week and I also reload. Handle a lot of items that are "contaminated" according to our local EPA - California. Passed my test, no where near the upper acceptable lever.
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I work full time in the music industry and many products we work with have sticker and tags that state "materials used in this item have been know to cause cancer" we geez it is a PA speaker I plan on putting it on a stand and using it nor eating the damn thing.
The formaldehyde the adhesives give off as they age is one carcinogen. It’s one of the pollutants people screamed about in the FEMA ( and all other living space ) trailers.
 

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I used to work for a company that made car batteries and we had to have our blood lead level checked every 6 months. I never had issues. Our training indicated that most of the lead in a persons body comes from poor hygiene practices. For example, working with lead and then eating or having a smoke without washing hands. They really emphasized "hand to mouth" contact. It takes a lot of lead in the air to cause problems by breathing it in.
 

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In 50 years of shooting and reloading, I’m aware of one shooter other than Annie Oakley to suffer from lead poisoning. In a week long process , a club I belonged to would annually mine the ranges and then on site, smelt over a ton of recovered lead bullets with propane burners into ingots for use of the membership. One year the club president was present 24/7 and very directly involved with oversight of the entire melting operation. No masks as I recall. At some point he wasn’t feeling so good and was diagnosed with lead poisoning. After a month of at home med care he was back in operation seemingly no worse for wear.
 

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I knew 2 guys with elevated lead levels, both were pistol instructors that did a lot of shooting at old indoor ranges. I've had my blood tested a couple times, nothing exciting, but I did have to ask that it be included in my annual PX blood work.

Pat
 

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Even high volume shooting at an outdoor trap or skeet range is extremely unlikely to result in an elevated lead level.
There HAVE been reports of range officers exposed to vaporized lead from metal targets and dust from heavily contaminated dirt.
Indoor ranges are another issue
 

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When I first started casting bullets I did it in my garage, with the door open, but there was apparently not enough fresh air circulating. I came down with what I thought was a bad head cold, felt like crap, so I went to see my doctor. Lucky for me my doctor was an avid shooter and reloader, and knew enough to ask if I’d been casting lately. I told him I had been, but had the garage door open the whole time, he said it’s probably not lead poisoning, but let’s get the test, just to make sure. Low and behold, 2 weeks later, I got a letter from the County Health department stating I had higher than normal lead readings. Needless to say, all my casting is done outdoors now, when there is at least a little breeze blowing….. gotta try and save what few brain cells I have left. :)
 

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No W in lo and behold.

What's the origin of the phrase 'Lo and behold'?
The word 'lo' as used in this phrase is a shortening of 'look'. So, lo and behold! has the meaning of look! - behold!. Lo in this and its other meaning, which is more akin to O!, has been in use since the first Millennium and appears in the epic poem Beowulf.
 
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No W in lo and behold.

What's the origin of the phrase 'Lo and behold'?
The word 'lo' as used in this phrase is a shortening of 'look'. So, lo and behold! has the meaning of look! - behold!. Lo in this and its other meaning, which is more akin to O!, has been in use since the first Millennium and appears in the epic poem Beowulf.
So spell check doesn't have that information. It is known for it. Although it could be his mistake. Human air is being human.Ya I am full of it!
Steve
 

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I doubt most would have any issues in an outdoor setting. For indoor bullseye leagues at ranges with poor ventilation, yes, its a common concern, I recall at least 3 of my old teammates had elevated lead blood levels and wore ventilators to shoot in order to try and mitigate it.
 

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Anyone have their blood lead levels checked? I had to request mine to be included with my annual check up. Just curious as all I hear about is lead contaminants for our sport.
I shoot at least twice a week and I also reload. Handle a lot of items that are "contaminated" according to our local EPA - California. Passed my test, no where near the upper acceptable lever.
The very least of my worries.
 

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I doubt most would have any issues in an outdoor setting. For indoor bullseye leagues at ranges with poor ventilation, yes, its a common concern, I recall at least 3 of my old teammates had elevated lead blood levels and wore ventilators to shoot in order to try and mitigate it.
I shot Bullseye pistol (and ran matches and leagues, and cleaned the bullet traps and painted, etc. yeah, I was one of THOSE guys) in an indoor range for nearly 25 years. The city decided to try to close the range, citing dangerous lead levels. Every one of the rifle, pistol and junior shooters and coaches got their lead levels tested. Not a single one was even close to registering on the test, much less any dangerous level.

Didn't matter, the city closed the range anyway, the lead was too dangerous..
 

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The indoor ranges down under usually require coated (that is, painted with friction-reducing two pack) projectiles, rather than traditionally lubed bullets that are grooved with a grease or wax lubricant pressed into the groove/s.

The rationale is that if there is no lead in contact with the bore, then atmospheric lead contamination is reduced.

As has been said above, hand to mouth contamination is one of the key problems.

I would doubt that outdoor ranges would present much of a risk, unless you are eating reclaimed shot.
 
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