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Blaze orange for Big Game Hunting

3552 Views 27 Replies 22 Participants Last post by  The Canuck
I've noticed lately on You-Tube videos and TV shows the lack of blaze orange clothing while big game hunting. I was a state certified hunter safety instructor for over 30 yrs. and early in those years most states were ratcheting up the requirements for some form of blaze orange for big game hunting if not already in place (some states even require it for some small game/upland hunting). Seems lately there appears to be a lack of folks wearing some form of it. Is this a high fence thing, private land thing, if a guided hunt the guide doesn't have to wear any thing or does it have to do with camouflage clothing manufacturers marketing and sponsoring of the video taped hunts? I would not feel comfortable big game hunting anywhere without some form of blaze being worn specially not with this craze of "Long Range Shooting (Hunting)". Some of these hunters while preparing for the shot and after are so "amped up" they appear downright scary.
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Some of these hunters while preparing for the shot and after are so "amped up" they appear downright scary.
This is a cut & paste from NJ Digest. It’s crystal clear to me. On days when they release birds... you’ll want to be in full orange just driving near a WMA. An orange hard hat would be a good idea. I went once... that was too much.
Hunter Orange
Firearm hunters must wear a cap made of solid daylight fluorescent orange or an outer garment containing at least 200 square inches of fluorescent orange material visible from all sides at all times while engaged in hunting. A camo-orange hat alone is not adequate. This applies to all persons while hunting with a firearm for deer, bear, rabbit, hare, squirrel, coyote, fox, railbirds, and game birds including while in a tree stand. See exceptions below along with ground blind hunting fluorescent orange requirements.

Wearing a hunter orange hat is mandatory when firearm hunting for small game on wildlife management areas stocked with pheasant or quail. See list of WMAs at Pheasant and Quail Stamp Areas, Licenses, Permits, & Stamps.

All firearm and bow and arrow deer and black bear hunters utilizing a ground blind when a firearm deer season is open concurrently must display 200 square inches of hunter orange atop the blind and visible from all sides or within five feet outside the blind and higher than the blind or at least three feet off the ground, whichever is higher. During these concurrent seasons, bowhunters in tree stands also should consider wearing hunter orange.

Exceptions: the hunter orange law does not apply to waterfowl, crow, wild turkey, coyote/fox (during the special permit season, Small Game Hunting Regulations), woodchuck nor bowhunters except a bowhunter using a deer decoy must wear hunter orange, as above, while transporting a decoy into or out of the woods. During the Six-day Firearm Season, it is recommended that bowhunters wear hunter orange.
 

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Living in PA- I wouldn’t go (rifle) deer hunting without blaze orange on. It might not prevent every accident, but I’m still wearing it. That probably goes for most Eastern whitetail hunting- where hunter numbers are generally more concentrated in smaller areas.

I’ve hunted out West, I think most states require it, but not all (for gun hunting). In Canada, it’s not been required on the big game hunts I’ve been on (New Brunswick and Newfoundland). It didn’t bother me to not wear it at all- most places where it is not required, there is a lot of space to roam, and you can go a long time never seeing another hunter.
 

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I bow hunt Colorado, and muzzleloader season always starts the 3rd week of bow season, I can’t figure that out for the life of me, no bow hunters I know wears orange during that week the muzzleloader guys are there but it’s always on my mind, wish they would move it after bow season.
 

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The videos you are watching are mainly on private property I would be willing to bet. Also, as said above hunters really don't look too much like animals.

Also, if you hunt in populated areas the risk is much greater than 1 hunter per 10,000 acres. In some places there are a couple hunters per 40 acres.
 

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It rally depends on where and how you hunt. In upstate South Carolina and the big woods of Pennsylvania we do man drives with maybe a dozen drivers and a dozen standers. Buckshot and bullets are flying all over the place. It is not a matter of being mistaken for a deer but having a deer between you and another hunter. Some guys get tunnel vision when they see a deer and don't see the man in full blaze orange behind the deer. I know, it happened to me while I was wearing a blaze orange parka and hat.

At the club in Alabama there are only 11 members for 1100 acres. We sign up for a particular tree stand in advance and nobody else is allowed in the area. Hunting is exclusively out of tree stands. Members are not allowed to wander around and spread scent everywhere. The same is true of low country South Carolina except there are only three of us.
 
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