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What do you look for in a new pup. Quality pup, or price? Do you check out Pedigrees, OFA certifications of parents? Or a "cute puppy" ?
Any breeder can sell a $400. pup, from his back yard. Who is willing to pay
$1800.00 to $2000.00 for a pup, from a quality line?
DaveB, Ohio
 

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One place to buy a brittany... Quail Hollow Kennel

That is mine as a pup sitting in the pachysandra and the leaves on the lead-in bar

 

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Depends on what you want to do with it.
If it's just going to be a "couch potato" then the local amish puppy mill dog will be just fine, albeit overpriced.

If it's going to be just a hunting dog, you don't need the dam and sire to be titled dogs. Usually pups can be picked up from a local game farm that occasionally will breed their working dogs. Most of these dogs are registered too.

BUT, if you're going to compete with your pup, you better do your homework. Show dogs are just that. Bred for conformation and not so much prey drive. However some are dual titled. That's a big deal for some breeders.

As for competing, If you plan just local competitions you can probably get a pup from proven dogs for around $1000.
Most of these breeders are very particular as to who their pups go to, and rightfully so.

Then you have to consider training. You think trapshooting is addicting.................
Good Luck!
 

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Over the years, I have learned to lean heavily on the background/breeding of the litter. Dogs that come from bench stock may have some hunting instinct, but it takes a lot more work to bring it out. I have also found that pups/dogs that come from kennels that also train will not waste their time on dogs that throw pups without drive and instinct. Look for strong conformation with a dog that will not break down with bad hips. Once you have a pup, feed it premium food, avoiding trips to the vet and other maladies that improperly fed dogs will tend to lapse into.
 

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Hunt with the breeding pair before you commit. A dog is a long time commitment which can be second guessed or reassured by doing due diligence. Training is up to you. You can screw up a good or great pup too.
 

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This is the $1M question, I’ve seen high$$ dogs that didn’t amount to much and backyard pups that wouldn’t quit in the field. Puppies are a crap shoot, even with all the precautions and indicators there’s still a lot of unknown. If you have the money and are intent on having a real competitor a finished dog is a more sure way to go. Of the three pups I’ve had I’ve been lucky with two, lots of instinct and drive and they did their best not to let me screw-em up. The third, a yellow lab I lost at 3yo to vestibular disease, 1000’s of hrs training and the loss of that bond was a crushing blow. Dogs period are a risk, but the reward can be huge, choose wisely, work hard and pray.
 

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I've always said it don't matter what you pay for the dog, get one you think will work for you. By the time ol' rufus gets to be 14 it don't matter whether you paid $5000 or $59 you'll have a lot more invested.
 

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I wanted a labrador, adult or puppy didn't matter just as long as it was a labrador female. A couple that was in the process of breeding a female labrador posted that they were starting to breed the dog. We ponied up a three hundred dollar deposit and waited for the puppy. The litter had three black males three yellow two females and a male and five chocolates three and two. We didn't want to spend another two hundred so chose one of the yellow females. September 1st I started to learn what kind of bird dog I have. At not quite nine months that first day the puppy showed blinding glimpses of bird dog. The Fourth time out on about the day she is nine months old she was all bird dog when her feet hit the ground where we hunted that day. She is very visual and locks onto doves in flight. Giving me a look if I don't shoot. I wanted a breed not a mutt. I am not going to show or trial the dog so I don't need the most expensive pedigree of trials dog. While I want a dog with hunting instincts seven or eight months out of the year all it is going to called on to do is be house dog. So a loveable couch potato is a plus. As long as the bird dog comes to life and we have fun hunting birds when the time is right? That is a win win situation!

So a couch potato with bird dog in it is what I am looking for when I pick a a new or another puppy. As nothing can be worse then a high strung dog that when not being a bird dog is just a problem on steroids. Parents that are happy couch potatos but effective hunting dogs are how I picked and will pick again a bird dog puppy!

Al
 
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