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If you are just going to be a casual clay shooter a browning o/u cx with do the trick, once you get serious about trap then the sky is the limit, like most of us you will have owned at least 6 or 7 different guns within the first couple years, heck that's half the fun of trap shooting, pound them hard and let us know what you spent your hard earned $$$'s on.
 
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I was on a budget. My first main gun for trap is a browning 725 sporting I bought used. I had to sell another shotgun and a rifle to get it a few years ago to get. I have had good luck with my 725 but I have only put 2000-2500 rounds through it. Didnt shoot any last year. Seems like a good gun but I do wish I would have waited for the trap model. Just tried a 682x combo out this weekend that I plan to purchase. Seems like a great gun and is priced right. So to me it is the best trap gun that I can justify buying at this time.
 

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GU 725 Adj Combo & CG Summit Combo.
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What would you have done differently and why?
Buying a shotgun is like buying a car. Most folks buy the nicest car/shotgun they can afford to shoot. Because the shotgun is the cheapest part of shooting. You can get entry level Browning shotgun for less than 2 grand. The next step up is 4 grand. You have your choice of a Beretta 694 or the Caesar Guerini Summit shotguns. Shotguns keep going up from their. Most top off at 20,000 bucks. You can have engraving added if you like. That can add another $40,000 +, to your $20,000 shotgun if you like. How deep are your pockets? break em all jeff
 

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I would consider buying a Browning Trap grade O/U 32" with adjustable comb if trapshooting is your primary function. There are some sporting and all around O/Us that you may want to look into if you plan to use the gun for sports other than trap.
 

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I started trapshooting in 1970 and fell in love with the sport. At that time, I honestly thought you could improve by shooting different types of guns. I purchased a total over 100 trap guns from the basic model to high end.

The one lesson I learned was that you can not buy a good score with a more expensive gun. After 52 years and thousands of dollars later I finally realized once you find a gun that feels comfortable to shoot and it shoots where you look, marry the gun like you would marry your wife and treat her well.

Just like finding a true friend finding a good gun is something you do not want to give up. Do not let anyone talk you out of keeping that particular gun either.

The name of the game is breaking targets, once you find the right gun spend your hard earned money on shooting.
Steve Balistreri
Fox Point, Wisconsin
 

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I am new to the sport. Looking back, if you were purchasing your first trap gun. What would you have done differently and why?
Some guns will fit you naturally some will need tweaking and adjustments. I am assuming you just entering the sport. The best thing to do is go to you local club/s and talk to as many people as possible and ask to hold and handle as many guns as possible and see what feels right what not. Shoot some then evaluate again what feels right what not

If you are new to sport first year you’ll be learning yourself, how you behave and react. What might feel right at first eventually can change 180 degrees down the road. Learn yourself!


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I'm a total novice to trap shooting, but I got my hands on a 20ga 1100. I think it's perfect for me for fit, weight and recoil. It will be quite some time before I get good enough to need a "better gun" to have as much fun as I am having with this one. I'm only $300 into this gun, so if I ever move up it stays in the family.
Good luck finding a gun that makes you this happy.
First are you trying to earn good scores or buy good scores?

The biggest part of earning good scores is to simply add an L to earn or earning!

Buying a gun that has a reputation for being reliable yet is not expensive to change as you learn what the game is. But because you have to earn/learn be tight with your wallet and make sure you learn what every change you make truly does. Don't let the change be a flavor of the week wring it really good. When your entry level gun whether it has a few well thought out adjustments or has become a Franken gun translates into being able to pick up any gun and pretty much know this is the fit or that well never work. At that point you may earned your way into scores and your shotgun is what YOU want and not just a way to buy scores.

Also be aware that the big dogs in the sport are approached every day to use just about everything under the sun. The big dogs don't need the gimmicks that people want them to use, but if a big dog uses that gimmick, the seller may not have enough stock on hand to supply all the score buying copycats that instantly turn to "LOOK AT THOSE SCORES!, he did because he used (fill in the blank)"
My mentors always maintained, taught and practiced, that when you make a change if you don't use it earn it and learn until you (figuratively speaking of course) don't stay with it until you need a scoop shovel to dig yourself out from under the empties you made learning what the change did for you, you only slowed down your possible improvement!

In other words, "Put your money to use earning scores!" Because those have to be earned! They cannot be bought! When the scores consistently come? At that point you don't have to ask what is the best anything!

Al
 

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One that costs at least $8000.00. Anything less and the other shooters will laugh at you and won’t squad with you.
 

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Ya can't miss with a shotgun
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Pretty hard to go wrong with a High Standard Flite King Deluxe….. their team did quite well at the Grand this year. They’re not called, “High Standard” for nothing.

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Perazzi TM1 (Ithaca) Fixed Full with Stock Lock and a Bowen Release.
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I started shooting shotguns when I was around 60 and played the buy/sell game - 15 years ago. I can't even recall how many guns I bought and sold over those years. Today, my arsenal consists of a moderately used Remington 870 TB and a well-used Perazzi TM1. I still shop around - those K80s are sweeeet - but I think I've learned my lesson.
 

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I am new to the sport. Looking back, if you were purchasing your first trap gun. What would you have done differently and why?
You have asked the equivalent of “Which of your children are your favorite?”.

The official NRA instructor‘s response is two part. The first is tell you it is up to you to decide what you are going to use the gun for. Yes, you said trap, but you are asking a novice question. Trap is also made up of three disciplines: the first is sixteen yard singles (one clay, one shell), second is handicap, still one clay one shell, and finally there is doubles, two simultaneous clays, two shells. And of course do you want to use the gun for other sports like skeet or sporting clays, or the occasional duck? Trap guns for 16 yd singles and handicap are often single shot, single barrel. Shooting doubles does require either another barrel, or a semi-automatic action.

The second part is to find a gun that can do what you want and that it fits you. The rest is personal taste, with plenty of “Ford vs Chevy” bull thrown in.
 

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I'd suggest an o/u with choke tubes. Eventually you will want to shoot doubles. If you want to try skeet or sporting clays just change chokes.

Thinking outside of the box: I'd recommend a gun that can be fit with a Precision Fit Stock. Eventually you might want an adjustable comb and some kind of recoil system. A used PFS isn't a whole lot more than those 2 modifications. If (when) you decide on a different gun , change grips and tweak the PFS a little bit and you are good to go. If for some reason the used PFS doesn't work out, sell it and all you're out is the shipping.
 

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Pretty sure people back in the 70's were busting 25 straight with a shotgun from Western Auto or Sears so buy one of those and have at it.
I know I'm mangling this quote. "Never shoot competitively against a guy who only owns one gun." Or as my dad put it, "get good with what you got." I come from a long line of "frugal" people.
 

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