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I’ve had my eye on the Beretta UGB25 Excel for years, always thought the loading design was very intriguing. After not being able to find a 30” barrel assembly for my discontinued Remington O/U, I thought I might let I go and make room in my safe Beretta. The UGB25 Excel is not that easy to find and I’ve never actually seen one in person. It wouldn’t be the first time I’ve bought a gun just because I thought it looked cool but knowing that I’m probably going to have send a decent amount of my money off just to have the gun shipped to me, I thought doing some research would be wise. Has anyone out there with one or knows about them encountered any problems with the Beretta Ugb25 Excel? Feeding? Ejecting? Breakdowns? Any words of advice or direction would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
 

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Check out the posts at the bottom of the page !! The local Gun Club around here ,Prince George Shooting Center had a few . A lot of people did a "test drive " and at the end they sold them for 50 % off . I have not seen one on the line in more then 5 years
 

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I purchased the sporting model with 32" bbl and it was a very good handling gun. I too bought it on a whim because of the "intrigue" of the design. Mine worked flawlessly and really was well balanced. I shot it for several years without any issues at all.
It is somewhat intricate to assemble and disassemble but once you get it figured out, it goes fairly well...sometimes it feels like you need 3 hands to re-assemble.
I ended up selling it when Beretta decided they were not going to import them any more and I was told that they were not going to support repairs as well. That is basically the only reason I sold it.
The American market just did not warm up to this gun. When they first came on the scene, they were quite expensive, but retailers soon realized they were not going to sell them for that price and eventually prices were dropped drastically. I purchased my 32" Excel Sporting brand new from Michael Murphy and Sons for $1800 plus shipping. I have not seen any around or for sale for quite sometime. If you find one, give it a try...they really were a good gun and a pleasure to shoot.

Gene
 

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I have had mine for a couple years. I shoot it for doubles only. Only problem I had was a firing pin guide made of rubber was brittle and broke apart. The bolt came flying out of the receiver but looking back now, it could have very well been user error from incorrect reassembly after a through cleaning.

Brownells can get you just about any part, some in stock, others take a month since parts come from Italy. Sad that the American shotgun market refuses to join in with the modern advancement of shotgun design, I think the foreign manufacturers will have to show us how.
 

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only ever saw one on the line up here, don't really know anything about them good bad or indifferent, they do look interesting though
 

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Nothing mystic about it, it is a break open shotgun. The first shell is loaded in the chamber, the second in the side carrier on the right of the receiver. Fire the first round, the bolt recedes, extracts and throws the hull through the bottom ejection port. The shell carrier swings into the receiver with the second round which is pushed into the chamber by the bolt returning to it’s closed position. Fire again, the second hull is extracted through the bottom, about 3 feet straight ahead of you.

It is very fast cycling. There is no gas ports, it is all spring action with a massive spring under the barrel and a bolt spring that rides in the stock. There is very few lubrication points. It does not get dirty to the point it will stop working.

The rib is not adjustable, but the comb is and it has shims between the stock and receiver to adjust from drop and cast on/off. The recoil pad is adjustable for LOP with spacers you add or subtract from rods that are mounted on a plate that hold the recoil pad. Comes with choke tubes, wrench and other accessories.
 
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I think the spring for the bolt return is in the stock like an Remington 1100. It uses the short recoil action, where the barrel moves maybe 1/4 inch and this throws the bolt back extracting the shell and ejecting it. It has a carrier that sits outside the receiver on the right hand side where the second shot for doubles resides. It has a big side lever on the left side for opening it. Assembly/disassembly is a pain in the butt.

I test drove the prototype in 1999 at the National Sporting Clays Championship. It didn't work well then but they did get it fixed. It was what inspired me to go ahead and build my design, the Butler XX12.

It was built as an alternate, less costly gun for International Bunker Trap where you move after each target. You have to have the gun unloaded or broken open before moving to the next station. You could do it where with a regular auto, you'd have to clear the second shell and reload. I'm not sure if auto's are allowed now.

It had a decent trigger, but it was a complicated gun, and compared to auto's, didn't compensate for recoil like an auto with a gas piston. It needed recoil to work just like Benelli's. Inertia driven is also recoil driven. It's how they work.

It did have a decent trigger as it was a dedicated trigger. 90 degree hammer fall so not so quick, but not compromised like regular auto's which have the carrier/carrier dog/ shell release levers and such attached to the trigger plate.

Larry Butler
 

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I think the spring for the bolt return is in the stock like an Remington 1100. It uses the short recoil action, where the barrel moves maybe 1/4 inch and this throws the bolt back extracting the shell and ejecting it. It has a carrier that sits outside the receiver on the right hand side where the second shot for doubles resides. It has a big side lever on the left side for opening it. Assembly/disassembly is a pain in the butt.

I test drove the prototype in 1999 at the National Sporting Clays Championship. It didn't work well then but they did get it fixed. It was what inspired me to go ahead and build my design, the Butler XX12.

It was built as an alternate, less costly gun for International Bunker Trap where you move after each target. You have to have the gun unloaded or broken open before moving to the next station. You could do it where with a regular auto, you'd have to clear the second shell and reload. I'm not sure if auto's are allowed now.

It had a decent trigger, but it was a complicated gun, and compared to auto's, didn't compensate for recoil like an auto with a gas piston. It needed recoil to work just like Benelli's. Inertia driven is also recoil driven. It's how they work.

It did have a decent trigger as it was a dedicated trigger. 90 degree hammer fall so not so quick, but not compromised like regular auto's which have the carrier/carrier dog/ shell release levers and such attached to the trigger plate.

Larry Butler
Yes, there is a spring that the bolt rides on back into the stock. I did not mean to say the heavy spring below the barrel is hidden by the fore end wood was cycling the bolt completely. Yes it is a complicated system, and a PIA to assemble, even when removing from the case to assemble the barrel and fore end to the receiver. It takes 3 hands. Removing a live shell can also be a PIA. It is not as soft shooting as a Butler, but the Beretta is a good pointer in it’s own right.
 

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Check out the posts at the bottom of the page !! The local Gun Club around here ,Prince George Shooting Center had a few . A lot of people did a "test drive " and at the end they sold them for 50 % off . I have not seen one on the line in more then 5 years
PG still had a couple of the new sporting models in stock in 2019. I inquired about the cost, and was quoted $3K. I chuckled and said I would pass.
 

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Do not buy one. Most of them just end up sitting in the back of a gun safe next to a Browning recoil-less.

Hey, that’s not true. I use my Beretta for Doubles and my Recoil Less for times my shoulder bothers me,
 

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I've had one and shot it well with a wenig stock on it. At some point in time I'll probably buy another one because I liked it so much.
 

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One of the men I shoot sporting clays with has a couple of them. Shoots a lot of targets. Also has many other high quality shotguns, Kolar, Krieghoff, Perazzi , Browning etc. But when he gets serious out comes the UGB. I haven't seen him have any problems with it and he is not a keep it clean guy.

Buster
 

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There are a couple of videos on YouTube on this gun, including maintenance.
 

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My Buddy bought one when they first came out. He felt like the toast of the town at first. Everyone wanted to look at it. He sold it a year later at a large loss. He never could figure out how to take it apart. We had another shooter at our club who had one. He took it apart and ended up selling it. He never figured out how to put it together again. These guns were so new back then there was nothing on the internet to show you. Even the nearest dealers had not worked on them yet.

I too "Say" Stay Away from these Guns. They were designed for International Bunker Trap in the European Marketplace. There is no interest in them anymore. No dealer support, no resale value. Why buy one. Unless of course you like collecting complicated old guns like the Browning recoiless? If so buy a Ugly 25 and add it to your collection. LOL. break em all Jeff
 

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Why buy one. Unless of course you like collecting complicated old guns like the Browning recoiless? If so buy a Ugly 25 and add it to your collection. LOL. break em all Jeff
Just what the heck are you trying to say?:127:

But you are right, no gun for amateur gunsmiths. I have had mine apart a couple times for year end cleaning but never had a problem getting it put back together again. Takes my wife about 5 minutes or less. It really freaks me out how she can look at a pile of parts and know what goes where.
 

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Just what the heck are you trying to say?:127:
They are a overly complicated automatic shotgun that was made for International Bunker Trap. They have little following here in the US. So there resale value is poor. From what I've heard on the this post, Beretta no longer going service's this firearm. My nickname for this firearm is a Ugly 25. I thought is was obvious that am trying to get the OP on this thread to buy this firearm!!! LOL. My buddy bought one of these when they first came out. There was no U-tube video's to watch to help you re-assemble this gun back then. No local gunsmith could help. The owner literally had to send the firearm back to the factory (at his expense) to have his firearm put back together when they first came out. Many shooters here compared this firearm to Bronwings Recoiless Shotgun at the time as well.

They do shoot well though, but they don't reduce recoil. Since they are not gas operated. They are a interesting firearm that will attract a lot of attention on any Trap field. Personally, I just don't see the need for them for American style Trap. Too each there own, I guess. break em all Jeff
 
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