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Hello everyone,

I have a question: I own a Beretta 686 I purchased about a year and half ago. I have shot about 7-8 k rounds. The gun has a very nice crisp trigger. However, lately every 50 or so shots I have noticed a little hesitation, or sometime the opposite, a VERY light pull.

I am wondering if it is not the time to open the action, take apart the trigger and give it a good cleaning. I think I can do this, but it will take me few hours because of my limited experience. I am debating whether I should go ahead and do it or wait until it becomes a real problem.

Thank you for any suggestions.
 

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Sounds like it is a problem right now. Shouldn't take you more than a few minutes to remove the stock and look at the mechanism. A little WD-40 and an air compressor should make quick work of the internal cleanings and you should be back to shooting in 10-15 minutes. Chances are you may have original packing grease built up inside with fouling from shells or maybe a small piece of un-burned powder causing the issues. Good luck and good shooting, Rey
 

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My first Beretta 682 (same action as the 686) owners manual stated once a year or sooner if I shot a lot, was to soak the action in kerosene. Blow dry with compressed air, then soak in Beretta oil, blow dry with compressed air.
The later manuals state to take it to a qualified Beretta smith. Since there were no Beretta smith close to me and I did not have Beretta oil, I asked Beretta at a big shoot what I could use. They said Break Free would work.

Now I think Q20 Black would be the best.

Jason
 

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reyper has given you good advice in taking a minimalist approach to your problem. I shoot Berettas and after one look at the internals of the receiver, I decided any work asides from careful flushing and relubing was a job for a good gunsmith. Take care not to wash out the grease in the top lever area as disassembly should be performed for proper re-greasing.
Beretta O/Us, using a closed action receiver, tend to stay fairly clean compared to open action O/Us.
 

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Rey has offered good advice, but allow me to comment. WD40 is optimized for water displacement, not cleaning or lube. I suggest using either Break Free or another quality aerosol spray lubricating oil to flush away any loose residue from the trigger mechanism (after removing the stock). Brush the wet metal as needed with a 1/2" nylon bristle paint brush. Stand the action front-up on newspaper or paper towel and allow any excess lube to drain out. Then, hold the small pins, #16 & #71 in the parts diagram in place with your fingers while blowing out the action with compressed air.

SCHEMATIC ID# 894
Click on a red number to view more information on that item and to add that factory part to your shopping cart. Select "SKU Listing" to see all stock numbers for this schematic.

View All Available SKUs View All Factory Discontinued Items
 

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As Ed said, make sure you hold the pins in place. They can be blown out easily.
Remove the stock and blast the action with Rem Oil. It cleans and protects.
Wipe the excess off with a paper towel. Place a small amount of gun grease
on the hammer notch's where the sear engage's. This will probably solve your
issue.
 

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Remove the stock and blast the action with Rem Oil. It cleans and protects.
Wipe the excess off with a paper towel. Place a small amount of gun grease
on the hammer notch's where the sear engage's. This will probably solve your
issue.
Q-Tips work well to get into guts of the receiver internals too to clean excess grease and too much oil. Another good spray is Remington Action Cleaner as it cleans and evaporates.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I ended up taking the trigger apart and cleaning it with Ed's Red followed by Ballistol. Disassembly was easy. Reassembly not so much. After I finished putting the gun back together, I realised that the second barrel would not engage. I had to take every down again and spent a couple of hours to figure out what the problem was: it turned out that I had the small spring that goes under the inertia block lever wrongly installed. After fixing that, the gun now shoots great again.

A final comment: to my surprise, after 7-8 k rounds, the trigger had very little powder residue inside and was almost perfectly clean.

I appreciate all the great suggestions.

Thank you!
 

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I typically pull stock once annually(barring I get caught shooting in rain) flush with gun srubber or powder blast & regrease & oil. Look for any potential issues while inside. Beretta 680series designs are normally stay very clean inside compared to some other brands, ymmv. Been running them since fall of ‘95 and my only issues have been rust on mono-blocks of 1st gun, a few inertia blocks springs between it and 682x combo #2. Current 687 SP3 is only 6months & less than 5k shells thru it
 

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There is a reason the 68x series is revered.
Actually there are about a bajillion reasons. The ease of maintenance and lack of accumulation of crud are just two of them.
 
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