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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone cut the hammer springs or installed lighter hammer springs? If so, please provide information.
 

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I'm always amazed when someone wants to change the manufacturers specifications on something they know nothing about. If the gun is new it should be tight and will loosen with use. If the gun is well used and tight it's t to see a gunsmith or you need how to use leverage to open it As shooting Coach said you're inviting trouble making changes.

Surfer
 

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shorten the ejection springs ,i have done that to all my o/u guns ,when you open your gun that's what you feel. you don't need your empties flying 20 feet behind you. been there ,done that.
or try putting the barrels on the rubber pad and opening it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You are inviting light strikes and misfires. Leave it alone, if you can't open it, get a girl at the counter to help you. :1a:
I'm always amazed when someone wants to change the manufacturers specifications on something they know nothing about. If the gun is new it should be tight and will loosen with use. If the gun is well used and tight it's t to see a gunsmith or you need how to use leverage to open it As shooting Coach said you're inviting trouble making changes.
shorten the ejection springs ,i have done that to all my o/u guns ,when you open your gun that's what you feel. you don't need your empties flying 20 feet behind you. been there ,done that.
or try putting the barrels on the rubber pad and opening it.
Thanks to all for your comments. I'll address them in order.

Shooting Coach: I've developed a procedure that will prevent light strikes and misfires. The girl at the counter doesn't want to deal with an old soldier who was wounded four times in combat.

dead on 4: Having done countless trigger jobs on S&Ws and 1911s, starting over 45 years ago, when the only way to reduce double action trigger pull or sear pressure was to cut mainsprings. I've learned that all production firearms are mechanically over-engineered. My shotgun is just over a year old with a round count of 13,000+. It isn't excessively tight, I would just like to reduce the required cocking force. As for inviting trouble, I did that for 21 years in the Army.

redfin 1956: I shortened the ejector springs 3/8s inch long ago. Makes it much easier to catch the empties when they spring out of the chamber. Truth be told, the ejector springs have little to do with the cocking force requirement.

If anyone out there has any useful information, I would like to hear it. I've always believed I could learn something from almost anyone. Even Forest Gump.

DAB
Abn, Rng, SF, Inf.
RVN 69,70,71
 

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DAB, I have a 682 Beretta & it was stiff to open & close when new but eventually wore in. The hammer springs compress when the gun is opened & the ejector springs compress on closing. I would not shorten the hammer springs. If the gun is new, it should loosen up. If it is an older gun, something else is wrong besides spring tension. John
 

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DAB, I have a 682 Beretta & it was stiff to open & close when new but eventually wore in. The hammer springs compress when the gun is opened & the ejector springs compress on closing. I would not shorten the hammer springs. If the gun is new, it should loosen up. If it is an older gun, something else is wrong besides spring tension. John

Just put a pair of hammer spring and guide assemblies in my grandson's 682X. Along with all other action springs. It isn't spring force causing your problem cocking. Try a stock off cleaning and lubrication of the receiver and a good lube job of the bbl prior to reassembly without the stock. Operate the shotgun several times and watch how things move. See if there isn't a heavy buildup of crud and corruption in front of the bottom side of both hammers. That is where the cocking cams are located. The rods, springs, plungers, and pins down in there are hard to get at but will clean up in a bath of mineral spirits and a little time to soak. Then use something like REMOIL or CLP or another penetration firearm lube and soak the heck out of everything. Let it sit for at least 30 minutes to work in deep. Then blow at all out ( as much as will blow ) and wipe the rest off as much as you can with a dry shop towel.
 

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Hi Dab - for my own part, thank you for your service AND remaining polite during this thread. If you have need of an easier to open gun, I don't think anybody has a right to ridicule you and tell you to get the range's counter girl to open it for you.

See what I'm saying :)
 

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The ejector springs have nothing to do with hard opening. Find out if the sides of the monobloc are too tight against the inner receiver walls. This is sometimes the cause of hard opening and cocking. Are the barrels on your gun original to the gun? It is unusual for Beretta barrels to be tight in the receiver, but some barrels not made for the gun will be a bit tight. I have not had that problem, but you may be experiencing it.
 

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Other than all the ill effects from shortening the hammer springs,

In an O/U gun, lube the forend iron/receiver contact area is 10 times more effective than changing hammer springs for easy opening.
 

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my 682 skeet still is very tight after 4 years of shootin,so I shortened the ejector springs 1/4 of a inch ,mucho better. those springs are very powerful ,again , do you need your emptys flying 20 feet back?
I have too many new berettas that were very tight,and saw 2 that were starting to gaul. lube a lot!
 
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