Trapshooters Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,364 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

I looked around on here and could not fine this information, so sorry if I missed it.

Does anyone know the approximate timeline (order and years each was made) for the different versions of the beretta 682 line?

thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,133 Posts
Does anyone know the approximate timeline (order and years each was made) for the different versions of the beretta 682 line?
No such list exists.

You would need to go through the last 40 years of catalogs and try to piece something together, but even then there are a lot of dealer specific configurations that won't be cataloged.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,165 Posts
Wide vs Narrow Beretta 682 Receivers
There are two primary versions of the action of the Beretta 682 shotgun. The first version of the action is the original version, designated by a model number such as S682, and made at least through 1994. These earlier models are known as "wide" or "large" frame 682s. At some point, Beretta dropped the "S" from the front of the 682 model number, narrowed the receiver, introduced a new choke system, and reduced the barrel weight as well. This new model is consistent in width (or "narrow") with the 686 and 687 lines.
It is important to know the version of the 682 in question, as the wood components from a current narrow 682/686/687 [1.525 inches, 38.7 mm] will not fit on an older S682 wide receiver [1.585 inches, 40.3 mm] shotgun; replacement stocks for wide 682 shotguns need to be custom made at this point. Other than serial number lookup for production year, measurement of the frame size is the width measured in front of the breech across the recoil shoulders.
The older and newer models share many of the same parts, and barrel sets from narrow 682 shotguns can be used without issue in the wide S682 shotgun. However, there is only a 10% chance that a new model 682 barrel with drop in place and work properly on an older wide frame S682; gunsmithing and fit checking by a professional is always recommended. Obviously] there will be a very small lip present where the narrow barrel doesn't exactly match the wide receiver. One of the most common issues with simply dropping an unfitted barrel into a S682 is that the ejectors may not work properly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,364 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think I did not ask quite correctly what I am looking for....

I am looking to try to find out when the 682 gold e version of the receivers were made, and the gold prior to them, and what was before the gold and about when etc.

not each specific model within that.

sorry for not being more clear.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,165 Posts
1. As stated above all Beretta 680, 682, 686 and 687 have the same basic actions.
The 680, 682 and 687EELL are full-featured target guns. All wear parts are easily and inexpensively replaceable. The barrels have replaceable barrel shoulders, which the 686 and 687's do not have.
The 680 was the initial target version. They have the wide and heavy receiver. They do not have the adjustable length of pull triggers and the barrel side ribs are not ventilated.
The 682 replaced the 680 and added the adjustable length of pull trigger and ventilated barrel side ribs. The early versions have the wide and heavy receiver. The earliest guns were marked S682, all I have measured have wide receivers. In later guns the only way to identify the wide or narrow versions is to measure the receiver width. A barrel made for a wide receiver will fit a narrow receiver, but the barrel shoulders will hang over. A narrow barrel will fit a wide receiver, but the barrel shoulders will be a bit inside the receiver edges. There were polished silver and black versions of the receiver. The black versions were usually 682X Trap guns or Super Sports. Early 682's have fore ends that do not have finger groves. Later fore ends have finger grooves, which I detest. Sporting versions usually have Schnabel fore ends which I also detest. There were Super Sport versions with a ugly stock that had replaceable combs and rock hard recoil pads.
The 682 Gold replace the 682 and I believe are all the narrow receiver. The receiver finish changed to a nice gold/bronze/olive color
All the barrels to this point are generally bored .721-.722" and use Mobil chokes.
The 682 Gold E is the latest version. Receiver finish changed to an updated busy design, not to my taste. They have generally lighter weight barrels that are bored to .735" and use the Optima choke system.
A 687EELL is basically a 680/682 with false side-plates. Early versions do not have the adjustable length of pull triggers and have the wide and heavy receivers. Later versions have the adjustable trigger, and at some point swapped over to the narrow receiver.
The usual way to convert the triggers to work, with the small gauges, is to polish the bearing surfaces of the inertia block sear surfaces. It is not uncommon to see skeet guns that have so much material removed as to render the inertia system inoperable. Which is not usually a problem as long as the gun is held with a firm grip. Kolar does a very nice fully-mechanical conversion, but they get $325 and will only do the conversion on a gun they have tubed. The Kolar conversion requires the shooter to fully release the trigger which some find disconcerting.
I prefer the older wide receiver guns. If you want a quicker handling gun then you probably want one of the newer guns.

There seems to be some confusion between the Optima and Optima Plus chokes. The Optima is used in the 682 Gold E ,newer 687's and newer auto-loaders. The Optima Plus was an over-bored version of the Mobile choke system and was used on 3 1/2" 391 auto-loaders and is not compatible with the Optima system.
mag410, Jul 15, 2010
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,628 Posts
I bought new 682 Gold combos in 1996.
They had the Greystone finish.
They hadn't been around very long @ that time.

I had a Gold E about 2010.
The Gold E started in about 2001 and ran until about 2014.

Its All Good

West
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
607 Posts
1. As stated above all Beretta 680, 682, 686 and 687 have the same basic actions.
The 680, 682 and 687EELL are full-featured target guns. All wear parts are easily and inexpensively replaceable. The barrels have replaceable barrel shoulders, which the 686 and 687's do not have.
The 680 was the initial target version. They have the wide and heavy receiver. They do not have the adjustable length of pull triggers and the barrel side ribs are not ventilated.
The 682 replaced the 680 and added the adjustable length of pull trigger and ventilated barrel side ribs. The early versions have the wide and heavy receiver. The earliest guns were marked S682, all I have measured have wide receivers. In later guns the only way to identify the wide or narrow versions is to measure the receiver width. A barrel made for a wide receiver will fit a narrow receiver, but the barrel shoulders will hang over. A narrow barrel will fit a wide receiver, but the barrel shoulders will be a bit inside the receiver edges. There were polished silver and black versions of the receiver. The black versions were usually 682X Trap guns or Super Sports. Early 682's have fore ends that do not have finger groves. Later fore ends have finger grooves, which I detest. Sporting versions usually have Schnabel fore ends which I also detest. There were Super Sport versions with a ugly stock that had replaceable combs and rock hard recoil pads.
The 682 Gold replace the 682 and I believe are all the narrow receiver. The receiver finish changed to a nice gold/bronze/olive color
All the barrels to this point are generally bored .721-.722" and use Mobil chokes.
The 682 Gold E is the latest version. Receiver finish changed to an updated busy design, not to my taste. They have generally lighter weight barrels that are bored to .735" and use the Optima choke system.
A 687EELL is basically a 680/682 with false side-plates. Early versions do not have the adjustable length of pull triggers and have the wide and heavy receivers. Later versions have the adjustable trigger, and at some point swapped over to the narrow receiver.
The usual way to convert the triggers to work, with the small gauges, is to polish the bearing surfaces of the inertia block sear surfaces. It is not uncommon to see skeet guns that have so much material removed as to render the inertia system inoperable. Which is not usually a problem as long as the gun is held with a firm grip. Kolar does a very nice fully-mechanical conversion, but they get $325 and will only do the conversion on a gun they have tubed. The Kolar conversion requires the shooter to fully release the trigger which some find disconcerting.
I prefer the older wide receiver guns. If you want a quicker handling gun then you probably want one of the newer guns.

There seems to be some confusion between the Optima and Optima Plus chokes. The Optima is used in the 682 Gold E ,newer 687's and newer auto-loaders. The Optima Plus was an over-bored version of the Mobile choke system and was used on 3 1/2" 391 auto-loaders and is not compatible with the Optima system.
mag410, Jul 15, 2010
Where did the Super Trap 682 fit in all this? Lester
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
838 Posts
Beretta web site to check by serial # production year
Firearm Technical Data Search

I have several Beretta catalogs to determine OP question running changes for the 682's. The problem with Beretta catalogs most are not dated for a copy right year.

The S 682 Gold and 682 Gold X Trap began in 1994, the first year of the narrow receiver while the dark receiver 682 X Trap is not listed in the catalog. I own a 682 X Trap mono built in 1995 that's a dark receiver while can't verify it was a catalog item. While I observed the 686 & 687 line Beretta drop the removable shoulders, the 682's retained the stainless removable shoulders and the ASE's & SO's are shown with the dark matte shoulders. The non fluted forearm was dropped and fluted "beavertail" forearm introduced as well as the new black rubber recoil pad. You would assume these are running changes? As mention above by West, the removable/adjustable combs are offered in the 1994 catalog and referred as "Super Trap". While not pictured their was a S 687 Trap too with silver receiver and game scene engraving.

In 1996 the S 682 Gold Graystone" receiver is cataloged, in 1994 Beretta had 7 S 682 Trap offerings and reduced to 4 in 1996. The S 682 "super traps" had removable recoil pads and combs with option for ported barrels. The 687 EELL are shown with stainless shoulders and pre-1994 Packmyr vented recoil pads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
838 Posts
The 1997 & 1998 Beretta catalog continues the same S 682 greystone offerings for Trap, a new straight comb flat rib is offered and adjustable com for X series. The 687 EELL is now offered as a flat rib with fixed chokes only dropping step ribs. Mobil chokes continue to be offered through 1998.

I have a catalog for the 682 E models date appears 2001; optima choke, still S 682, Gold E trap 30" flat rib, a Gold E Double Trap bottom barrel mobile choke top barrel fixed choke, S 682 Gold E X Trap o/u barrels, S 682 E X Trap mono, S 682 E X combo 2 barrel set all pictured with adjustable combs.

Special note: ASE Gold X Traps with mobile chokes still offered with new DT 10's offerings.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top