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Beretta 682 barrels

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I have a question for those who are in the know. Aren’t the shoulders replaceable on the barrels? I know a guy that had his bushed. I haven’t heard of any one that has had them replaced. I had bigger pins put in my combo. What do people do if they add a new barrel to a receiver with oversized pins.
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Refitting a bolt to tighten lock-up may include installing bushings in the rear face of the barrel where the bolt pins engage. This is a separate service item from replacing the shoulders. -Ed
 

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The replaceable shoulders were designed to tighten the barrel lock up along with a new "locking bolt".
I believe their are 4 different sizes of the locking bolt depending on the wear of the locking bolt holes in the barrels. I don't believe the removable shoulders are replaced when the action is tighten. Beretta has dropped the removable shoulders on models over the years. A Beretta gunsmith who had worked @ the Beretta facility before they moved to Tenn. told me he never had to replace the shoulder as the new locking bolt tighten the barrel to the face of the receiver. If their is a noticeable gap between the barrel breech and face of the receiver would account for shoulders being replaced from my conversations with the Beretta gunsmith.

I'm sure "reyper" our forum Beretta expert can add much more to this conversation.
 

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I would think on the Beretta 682, you could keep going up in locking bolt sizes till you max out, then replace the shoulders and start with the smallest locking bolt size again. Though practically speaking, I’m guessing very few shoot their 682s enough to wear the shoulders enough to progress through all of the locking bolt sizes and require the shoulders to be replaced.
 

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The barrel lugs where the locking bolt fits into is not replaceable.
True, Rich Cole drills out the lug holes resets/epoxy a new cylinder to match the locking bolt and you're good to go for thousands of rounds. Their was a post on here a few years ago a member had it done after 250,000 rounds and that was after the 682 had been tighten 3X previously. The 682 can take a licking and keep on ticking.
 

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I remember a young man years ago Beretta loaned him a 682 for training for the International team. When he returned the 682 ran over 200,000 through it and during its time only the hammer springs had been replaced.
 

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I remember a young man years ago Beretta loaned him a 682 for training for the International team. When he returned the 682 ran over 200,000 through it and during its time only the hammer springs had been replaced.
As far as I know one of our Tokyo Olympians who is 28 is still shooting a low rib 682 given to him by his grand dad when he was 14. (The Olympian was 14, not his grand dad!!).

I'd hate to think how many rounds he has through his "busted old 682" as he calls it.
 

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The head guy at beretta told me the worst thing you can do while assembling the 680 series, is to put the barrels on the receiver and slam the gun shut without the forend on.

That will unevenly elongate and wear the holes in the barrel lugs.
Ease the gun close with the top lever opened, then put the forend on.
 

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How does the presence of the forearm change the locking lug effect? I had also heard that holding the lever open while closing the gun doesn't allow the locking lugs to engage properly and that causes wear.

I simply close the gun gently.
 

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I would think on the Beretta 682, you could keep going up in locking bolt sizes till you max out, then replace the shoulders and start with the smallest locking bolt size again. Though practically speaking, I’m guessing very few shoot their 682s enough to wear the shoulders enough to progress through all of the locking bolt sizes and require the shoulders to be replaced.
I'm not following this. The bolt holds the rear of the barrel down. The shoulders push the barrel rearward as the gun is closed, bolt engaged. When locked up properly, the top of the monoblock rear face contacts the face of the breach. If instead, the bottom of the shoulders contact the tops of the sides of the receiver and the rear of the monoblock is off the breach face (worn shoulders), firing the gun will drive the barrels rearward and batter the face.

Once the bolt recesses are worn so much the largest bolt is no longer enough, they must be repaired by welding/re-drilling or some kind of insert.

-Scot
 

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Not sure why, I’m just restating what he told me ( he was the main gunsmith back to when Cole worked at Beretta). I have heard the bit about not easing it closed with the lever open, just close it firmly. I’m guessing if you slam it shut with the forend off, it may result with uneven wear on one side. On my gun, one hole was elongated / oval.
 
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