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I've successfully refinished several stocks - even made some size and shape changes on the grip area. . All done slowly by hand (knife, chisel, auger, files, sandpaper, etc.).

I'm ready to try some more complex wood changes, starting by shortening the stock and adding one of the recoil devices. Next, I think I want to try adding comb hardware.

The key element is doing these projects with hand tools, and therein rests my questions. What type and brands of handsaws will give be the most accurate and clean cuts?
 

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What happened, you forget how to do things? You give me a call Grandpa, I will explain what you need and how to do it. Joe
 

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A really good handsaw with the proper number of teeth per inch will cost as much or more than a small benchtop bandsaw. That said, I prefer using hand tools and have backsaws made by Medalian Toolworks out of Canada. They are awesome, but expensive. There are a lot of woodworking tool suppliers that can provide you with a good saw. Tools for Working Wood comes to mind. They probably have a really good coping saw, which you will need to cut out the shape of an adjustable comb on a buttstock. For the hardwood stocks, you want more teeth per inch and less saw set (width of kerf). No need to go fast, but precision is very important. A method to hold the stock while sawing will be necessary also.
 

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You will have to decide between a American style saw which cuts on the push stroke and a Japanese style saw which cuts on the pull stroke. As much as I tried to like the Japanese style, I can't get use to it and stick with the American style. One isn't better than the other.
 

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You will have to decide between a American style saw which cuts on the push stroke and a Japanese style saw which cuts on the pull stroke. As much as I tried to like the Japanese style, I can't get use to it and stick with the American style. One isn't better than the other.
I got a nice 7 inch Japanese RAZORSAW by Gyokucho. Practicing making straight, perpendicular cuts. The most difficult part is going slow and being patient. That's what I need to learn, but not what I'm used to doing.
 

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Most woodworkers are like Trapshooters, more than willing to help with questions you have. YouTube has helped me a lot.

Slowing down is something I'm still working on.
 
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