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Discussion Starter #1
How many of you are old enough to remember when it was standard practice to put hulls on a cookie sheet and bake them in the oven for 3-4 minutes before reloading them?

Pat Ireland

PS - bakeing = baking (I don't know how the extra letter got in the title line)
 

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Pat, I would say the extra letter (e) got there by a malfunction of the left hand. That is if you are a twohanded typer. If not I would say you made a misspoint, but wait that would be applicable in either situation wouldn't it. Have a blessed day, Jake
 

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Sure do. My source for MT's back in those days used mostly winchester and westerns so that's what I usually baked.As I recall they smelled pretty good too, maybe not as good as a sheet of chocolate chip cookies coming out of the oven but close to it. I think the Feds smelled better than the WW.
 

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Did you also have a shell reconditioner? It looked like a cross-breed between an electric soldering copper and a curling iron. When it heated up, the business end was inserted into the shell and melted the wax in the paper so some of it would migrate into the crimp area.

Jere
 

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I like to stuff them with apple butter and seal them with pie dough with some sugar and cinnamon on top.MMMMMMMMM-mmmmmmmmm!
 

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There was a guy that used to come to Cheyenne. He used papers and held them together with tape. He would tape the tape over the split hull. Finally one day he blew up his 1100 and never came back (and we were glad). BTW he had more money than God

I always loved the smell when the hull got hot.
 

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I store my paper hulls in the top of the garage. I am working them down but still have 2,000-3000 left. On average, most hulls get about 3-6 months in the top of the garage where the temp often reaches well over 130 degrees.

For the past two years, I have shot mostly Gold Medal and STS plastic but still shoot some paper. New papers are simply too costly and I don't think that they are as strong as the 1970-1980 era shells (marked Federal Cartridge on the head.)

Ed Ward
 

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Yeah, I do. But I only warmed them and that was only if they had sat on the shelf too long, absorbed moisture, and swelled a bit. I was generally of the opinon that it tended to shorted the hull life (LOL - hard to believe any worries about hull life when you could only get maybe three loads out of one in the first place).

Hitapair - I'm going to vote for WW as the best smeller, followed closely by RP, and Federal way back. In my region in the fifties and early sixties, WW and RP probably had 90% of the market. That's got to be on account of the swell aroma, right?

Remington used those little, hard-to-find #97 primers, so they were a game unto themselves. Of the 209-type primers, there was not the fine degree of standardization as there is now, and someone's, maybe Winchester, were fractionally bigger that the other brands so that once you loaded a hull with them, you had to continue using them to keep subsequent primers from falling out.
 

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Did you guys ever wash used wads in your wifes washing machine and dry them in the cloths drier on gentle cycle. That sure is being thrifty. I did it for years, when the kids were growing up.
FRAN
 

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Many years ago with they came out with the "Shake N Bake" product for various meat selections, I had to know so that I did. In that time frame I found Federal papers to respond and taste best using the pork one. Winchester papers were best with chicken recipe. The invigorating arroma of fresh baked hulls first thing in the morning can only be out_did by a pint of freshly spilled Hoppe's #9.
 

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my son built me a large pan in high school,dry all hulls in a 200 deg. warmed oven for a hour ,have been doing it from day one 47 years...vdt
 

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Did not reload back then. We did dry our wet loaded paper shells in the oven during lunch on many occasions. We did not have much for rain gear either and it was strip down a fewe layers and dry hunting clothes during lunch and put a dry pair of boots on afterwards. This woold have been in thelate 1950's. Sadly to say that hunting partner passed away a few years ago. Bill
 

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Heck Phil, we had a similar old timer at our club back in the 60's. He was an expert at maximizing the reloading life of Federal papers and blowing up guns. I know of at least two-a Merkel and a Browning Lightning that met the same fate. He always enjoyed showing off his battle scars on his arm from those encounters. We had to banish him from the club because he flinched so bad he often walked off the line with a loaded gun and never got off the shot.

Old Harry was quite a guy and not hurtin' for money either!!
 

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When I started reloading there were no plastic shells or wads. I remember the smell of them in the oven. When the hulls got a glaze on them, that meant the wax was just starting to melt and it was time to get them out. By the time they cooled off on the cookie sheet, they were crisp, dry and ready to load.

The days of fiber and cardboard wads, #57 primers for Remingtons and #220's for everything else. When hull separations were a normal occurrence.

The days BEFORE Green Dot. I remember using 23 gr Red Dot and 1 1/8 oz shot. Alcan 220 Max-Fire primers were my favorite in Winnie and Fed hulls.

I used an ACME press for the 12, and a Lee Hand Tool for the 20. I did not shoot much 20! LOL

Red Dot was recommended in the 20 and even the 28. Those were the days. 2 1/2" 410 paper target loads were about $2 a box and roll crimped, so very few folks loaded them.

Happy holidays, all.
 

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My dad had a 'thing' for bacon grease. It was a cure for EVERY thing. I was just getting in to guns early [60s]. We had a skeet/trap club near by and he would take up to watch. I would pick up shells and keep them. I got into reloading about 68 with a Lee loader in 12 and 20 ga. Herters wads [still have some] Well the papers dry out I didnt know about wax and he didnt either. So his cure was bacon grease. It worked. I reloaded a box for him[remember this is with one of the little dippers and no scale] He hunted rabbits with a couple of buddys. They went hunting and a rabbit jumped up and dad shot it. Well I guess there was 2 dippers in that load. It just about knocked dad down. His buddy said "Geb believe you got him and smells he is already cooking" Happy T day
 

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Once tryed washing plastic hulls in a washing machine,Wife cuaght me Damn almost had to buy a new washing machine.. Jon Don't ask Me why brain fart
 
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