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Over the past 30 plus years of pulling (before voice calls), scoring & shooting I find that when a shooter calls for the target and no target is released, 2/3's of time time the next target is lost if the shooter fails to start his routine over. How many of you have seen this or do you think my analysis is flawed? Darrell
 

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I am hard of hearing and cannot always tell how loud or soft my own call is. I frequently encounter deaf microphones and was just leaving the gun mounted on my shoulder and calling again but a little louder. I have missed targets because of the break in concentration and I am going back to a routine of starting over again for a 'no bird'.
 

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My personal routine is to start over with a lowered gun and then remount and call for the bird. Yes your assumption is right on. The bigger percentage of missed targets is because the shooter didn't go from scratch to start over. Dan
 

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I think your analysis is flawed. When I get a broken (no) target I seldom go way back to the beginning and start my routine over. I normally just go back far enuf' to recapture my focus, and I seldom miss the next target.

John C. Saubak
 

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My observation as well. We have about 4 seconds of focus. If we run our clock out we have to re-start the clock. Lowering the gun and starting our routine again is the best way to re-start our clock.
 

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Broken or no target screws me up if I don't restart my "normal" routine. In the early days it cost me several targets.

Mike
 

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When I don't get a target, I lower the gun and start over. I have noticed that many targets are lost if the person does not start their routine over. That is why, in competition, I always lower my gun and start over. Bill Malcolm
 

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Yep, I will break the gun open, put the muzzle on the rest, and start over.

If I get two in a row, I will see a good bird before I remount.
 

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I take my gun down and then mount it again. I sometimes have thoughts in the back of my mind about another broken target, does the microphone work, is my call too soft, is the machine out of targets. Sometimes I miss. The harder I try to not think about these things, the more I think about them.

Pat Ireland
 

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Darrell - Your analysis is correct. I believe that trap is a "mental game" in which the shooter should have a set pre-shot routine which includes but is not limited to proper gun mount, breathing, and shot visualization. If your routine is broken, take a deep breath, focus, and restart your pre-shot routine.

Dave
 

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It's all a head game fella's............if you THINK you'll miss the next target if you don't go back to the beginning then you better go all the way back. Whatever it takes to regain your focus,

John C. Saubak
 

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I get lazy, more than once I have had a bad mic and had to call for a target 4-6 times. I deal with one just fine bug tend to get pissed after 2 or 3 or more calls. Then I am not ready for the target as I am expecting the machine to not throw one again. Pretty much always miss as I play catch up and think " I didn't see that one coming". Thank god I don't take this game seriously because I am pretty much laughing when I finally get a target. Then again I don't shoot trap in competition so it is funny.
 

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Stop, dismount, then regroup your thoughts. Likewise; when the shooter before you has a lost target, do the same thing. Take a short time out, regroup, then call for the target. You get no second chances. Every target is it's own game.
 
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