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Any IDPA shooters here ?

1646 Views 12 Replies 11 Participants Last post by  JD45
I don't have enough hobbies so I've decided to get into IDPA shooting. I've acquired the equipment and attended a couple of events. What I've learned is that I suck. I've not been exposed to pistol shooting other than about two days range time in basic training.

Anyone started into competitive shooting of any kind and if so . . . how did you go about improving your marksmanship skills ?
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improving marksmanship skills?

learn to shoot a little bullseye. it teaches trigger control and sight picture.

then you can transfer this knowledge to the quick and the fast IDPA..
 

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I am in agreement with BigM-Perazzi on this one.

Also, in my opinion, sight alignment and trigger control would be easier to learn with a decent .22 rimfire pistol...then graduate to a centerfire...then work on picking up your speed.

.22 ammo is certainly cheaper, and has no recoil...but I'll be darned if I know where to tell you to find some!

bluedsteel
 

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Practice drawing and placing 2 shots where they need to be. Don't worry about speed. It will come with PRACTICE. Work on accuracy........

Work on the 2 shot draws, then expand to 2 targets. Then work on movement. If possible, practice with some one else for safety reasons and for helping each other constructively.

John S (an old retired IPSC & IDPA shooter)
 

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Curious on what type of gun you are using? You have to master fundamentals before speeding up. TRIGGER CONTROL, SIGHT PICTURE!!! Smooth trigger pull THROUGH the shot as the front sight STAYS on target. Most likely you are anticipating the shot and hitting low (jerking the trigger and allowing your front sight to move). Front sight, front sight, front sight!!!!! You have to learn to keep it on target throughout the shot. If you don't know where your front sight is "when" the gun goes bang, you are not focusing on front sight Last, slow down and don't worry about shooting fast. Master the above and you will become confident and faster. Learn how to cut time on things you can control like reloading, moving, and transitioning from target to target. MOVE FAST SHOOT SLOW. And front sight!
 

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When I started learning to shoot for IDPA, I used a 22 conversion kit for my glock 34. It really made it easy and economical to practice. Of course, this was when 22 ammo was selling for $13.00 for 550 rounds. JM
 

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Learn how to keep proper sight alignment while executing PROPER TRIGGER SQUEEZE. Trigger squeeze is the key to better shooting. Proper trigger action helps focus your attention and slows you down. Mast the trigger and the rest will far in place.

Kip
 

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I shot IPSC for 12 yrs. I learned by going to matches and watching other shooters. BUT The fast track to better shooting is to get yourself a good coach who knows how to teach the proper shooting techniques and will take you through the basics first. It will make the sport much more enjoyable. I was the first Master Class shooter in North Carolina in IPSC. I never progressed until I learned you Can't Miss fast enough to win. Smooth Is Fast. Good luck. It is a great and rewarding sport. Bill Crane ipscmaster
 

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Go to brianenos.com and join the forum, and buy his book. Matt Burketts DVDs 1-3 should help alot.

First, you have to be able to shoot a good slow-fire group from a bench or any position. But that doesn't take long to learn.

If you listen to the right people, you will progress thousands of times faster than,"waiting for the speed to come". It takes work, and the right kind of work.

This is a quote on Brian's forum from Ben Stoeger, GM and national champion. He is becoming quite a teacher:

One of the more important training fallacies I see is how some people think that slow fire group shooting equates to “accuracy practice”.

I see this on a fairly regular basis. Some dude generally practices up close. 7 or 10 yards or whatever. He goes as fast as he can. He rips off the fastest draw and splits possible.

When it is time for accuracy training, he does slow fire group shooting. No time limit, no nothing. He just does the slow controlled trigger press and tries to get a really nice little group.

All of that is great, but there is a big gaping hole in that training. It just doesn’t prepare you to be accurate at a USPSA event. There isn’t time get a perfect trigger press for every “accurate” shot. You need to learn to speed that process up, but be just a hair more sloppy with it. You need to develop the whole spectrum. Not just as fast and sloppy as you can pull the trigger and “take all day” speed. You need to develop the part that is in the middle, that is where the matches tend to happen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I shot the first match with a Glock 26. Then transitioned to a new Springfield Armory 5.25 in 9mm. I considered the Glock 34 but couldn't find one at a decent price. The S.A. has the same features although it could benefit from a better after market trigger.

I have a Sig Sauer 10-22 I would practice with but cannot find .22 LR ammo anywhere. I am able to reload the 9mm and .45 calibers.

I have the benefit of being able to shoot on a 60 acre tract of land that belongs to a friend. We haven't had any group or individual training but that suggestion does seem to have a lot of merit.

At 63 years of age is it realistic to think, given reasonable practice time, adherence to fundamentals, and focused desire that I can attain expert classification ? Or do I not have enough time left ?
 

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If you are in decent health, I think you could make Master. Winning bid shoots in master class is another issue.

A local top shooter should be able to start you off on the right foot. Then, do what I should have done, take a 2-day class from one of the greats. It will save you tons of wasted time and ammo,dealing with bad habits.
 
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