Trapshooters Forum banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Forgive me for bring up ancient history, but it still makes me smile and yet, saddened.

Back around 1970, I worked in a hospital and became friends with a patient who, it turned out, had been a long-time registered trap shooter. While minor, his case required a couple weeks in the hospital and we developed a friendship. At some point, he asked if I'd have any interest in his trap gun. He had no heirs and he hadn't shot for many, many years.

At his discharge, he invited me to his home and showed me one of his guns. It was a fine, trap-grade Winchester 21, He insisted that I take the gun to try out, and I went to the local club and broke 49x50 from the 27 with it. He then asked if $800 was too much. I quickly agreed and, poor college student that I was, I asked my Dad to send me the money.

I returned the gun and told him I'd come down to pick it up the next day when I had the money.

Call after call went un-answered for our meet-up over the next few days, so I contacted a friend of his who sadly informed me that my friend had died of a sudden heart attack. With no close relatives, the guns were going to some distant relative who, despite some pleading from those in the know, had decided to saw the barrels off to 20" to use as a home defense gun.

Guess how sick I was.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,181 Posts
I’ve got one for you that’s sad and made a lot of folks mad. There was a fella that was single and no kids. Nearest relative a money grubbing niece. He had two very nice Kreighoffs. He told several people in our club that he intended for two young men he had mentored over the years to have his guns upon his demise. Well, he got sick and died. After his passing, the father of one of the young men told the niece about the conversations between the deceased and others in the club. She said well we will have to see about that! Strangely enough she couldn’t find his will or his laptop. She sold the guns to a dealer. The dealer then sold them to a man back east. One of the young men, being an amateur detective found the guns and talked to the buyer. He explained the situation to the buyer. The buyer said I’ll tell you what, I’ll sell you the guns for what I have in them and ship them to you. So the young man spent his life savings to buy both the guns. He kept the one he was supposed to have, and gave the other to his friend that was supposed to get the other one. Alls well as for the guns, but the young man had to spend his life savings for what he was supposed ro be his and his friends to begin with. How that woman can sleep is a mystery to me. I swear if I ever see her I’m going to tell her she’s the bitch from hell. How anyone could go against someone’s final wish’s, especially a family member is beyond me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
These situations arise every day in the legal world.

Without offering legal advice (because I'm only licensed in one state), I say this. If I want someone to have something I own, I give it to them. Done and done. If I want someone to have something after I die, I make my wishes known in a valid Will. Notice I said "valid." It gets a little tricky gifting to children, but a LAWYER!!!! will help you figure it out for a small fee...

Y'all know this. I'm preaching to the choir.

But here is my story. My grandparents visited me and my grandfather gave me his Thompson Center Hawken muzzleloader. Special to me - I hunted with it as a kid. A year after he died, a cousin asked me how I obtained the rifle. I could tell he was going to raise a stink about me having it by his tone. After I said it was a gift, he let the issue drop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,373 Posts
The entire problem with these situations is that the person FAILED TO DO PROPER LEGAL WORK to make these wishes happen. I am only 51 but our Will's and everything have been done for over 15 years and updated twice when needed, and that was not any too early. I have seen plenty of "old guys" just run at the mouth and when it comes down to it, they have not made any preparations for that day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,038 Posts
My Dad had a will as did my stepmother. Dad passed almost 6 yrs. ago. My stepmother 2 months ago. Dad said I was going to get his 1st year Colt 45 peacemaker and the Savage 99 my mom bought him for Xmas in 1954 0r 55, I called her several weeks after he passed and she said he had no will and she didn't know what happened to either gun. Her daughter got their place and everything else they had. I have no way to prove either way what she told me. She had dimentia for the last 3 or 4 years.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
596 Posts
As a young man I hunted and fished with my best friend and his Father, George. They would go to upstate New York to hunt deer every year and I was always invited. With a wife and two small children I couldn't justify taking off work to go with them. Well, the last time that they went, in the mid 70's, my buddy shot a spike buck. He tracked it just a little ways and saw another hunter putting his tag on it. They argued for a bit and my buddy went to get his Dad. George heard the shot his son made and took his safety off of his Remington Model 11. On the way to go back to the deer Georges gun got tangled in some brush and he jerked it and shot my friend directly in his left femur, destroying his ball and socket. Long, long recovery, but he lived. Twenty years later George passed away, sometime either at his house or the Funeral Home, I asked about the Model 11. My friends brother took it out of the house and wouldn't give it back. We're all in our mid 70's now and the two brothers have not spoken since that incident. Pay attention to Smooth Bore's words.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
My Dad had a will as did my stepmother. Dad passed almost 6 yrs. ago. My stepmother 2 months ago. Dad said I was going to get his 1st year Colt 45 peacemaker and the Savage 99 my mom bought him for Xmas in 1954 0r 55, I called her several weeks after he passed and she said he had no will and she didn't know what happened to either gun. Her daughter got their place and everything else they had. I have no way to prove either way what she told me. She had dimentia for the last 3 or 4 years.
This is a tough situation.

In some states, you can file your will at the courthouse. Or you can give a copy of your will to someone you trust. That might prevent a situation like what happened above. Recently, I updated my will. I emailed a buddy and told him where he could find a copy if something happened to me and my wife. He was my college roommate and I trust he will raise hell if someone tries anything funny.

My dad died of cancer 15 years ago - fortunately he told me to take his guns while he was alive. He requested that I leave a revolver for my mother. As soon as he gave me those guns, the headache was over as far as probate, etc. He didn't have any real assets or debts, so the estate was clean.

But be careful - if there is a pending bankruptcy, or one on the near future, don't think giving away high-end firearms is okay. That can come back to bite you - again, hire a good lawyer!

I don't have a deep knowledge of how a trust works. Just some basic knowledge that got me through a law school exam 20 years ago. But I recently ordered a suppressor that involves a trust. I plan to research what would happen if I move all my firearms into a trust. Trying to make everything easy for my kids.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,181 Posts
I’m not a lawyer but I do have a trust. A good one. I hired a lawyer that specializes in trusts. It cost me quite a bit but much cheaper than probate and I have peace of mind. It covers just about everything including power of attorney and medical. I highly recommend a trust. I have a copy as well as my attorney. In my case nobody is going to be able to mess with my estate.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,390 Posts
None of think we’re going to die. Or, at the least, we all think we’re gonna live for many years to come. Whether you’re 30 or 90 the inevitable is going to occur. I will admit I did not have a will until I was in my early 60’s. Just kept putting it off.

Trusting to relatives to “do the right” thing is a fool’s wish. I saw my wife’s two sisters cannabalize their father’s house when he died. Even to the extent of letting one (only one) of the grandkids come in and haul away furniture. As a result my wife ended up with very few keepsakes/very few family photos. They say you can pick your friends but you can’t pick your relatives. Somehow greed rears its ugly head when a loved one passes and there is money or property to be had.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,181 Posts
None of think we’re going to die. Or, at the least, we all think we’re gonna live for many years to come. Whether you’re 30 or 90 the inevitable is going to occur. I will admit I did not have a will until I was in my early 60’s. Just kept putting it off.

Trusting to relatives to “do the right” thing is a fool’s wish. I saw my wife’s two sisters cannabalize their father’s house when he died. Even to the extent of letting one (only one) of the grandkids come in and haul away furniture. As a result my wife ended up with very few keepsakes/very few family photos. They say you can pick your friends but you can’t pick your relatives. Somehow greed rears its ugly head when a loved one passes and there is money or property to be had.
Oh so true! I have stories to tell but no need. It does happen when it’s least expected.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,527 Posts
One of my ATA friends had a BT-99 set up for his wife.

Long story short, HIS stepson sold it to a friend as a Squirrel gun for drug money in the '80's.

Kid who bought it cut it down, so it had an open choke, and painted the whole gun with camo paint. So many of those sad stories abound.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
My attorney and friend called me a while back and said a friend of his passed away and had left his gun collection. His wife wanted to sell it. Didn't have a price in mind but wanted an offer- whatever my attorney though was fair. Somewhere in the $15-20k range. We were in the middle of a lawsuit and upcoming trial so I didn't push the issue much. He sent me a list and it wasnt that great either. About 10 items, a browning, some Berettas, a Winchester, and "old side by side." Later on he said a relative convinced the wife that the departed promised him the guns so she gave it to him.

Me and the attorney were shooting the s*** a couple weeks ago and he's telling me about estate planning. Mentions a friend/client who never did it and says "OH! It was the guy with the shotguns." I told him I was curious what they actually were and he said "I don't know but this guy wouldn't buy anything at all unless it was top of the line. If he gets a car it had to have every option. Like that. His guns were gorgeous.. works of art."

Still a little upset that I missed out on them but learned a valuable lesson. I didn't consider myself old enough to do any estate planning but I'm close to 40 without even realizing it.. My father isnt in the best of hell but still refuses to face his own mortality and hasn't planned for anything. I don't want to make that mistake!
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top