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Discussion Starter #1
Good evening

I am in the market for a new all-around gun for my 14 year old son - 5'8', 150 pounds. He has joined a local shooting club and has really enjoyed all clay sports. Currently, his team/club is very focused on skeet and trap, but he enjoys sporting clays the most. He has been shooting my old 682 with fixed skeet chokes for skeet and my Benelli 12ga competition for trap. I would really like to get him a solid all-around gun and he definitely prefers shooting an O/U. Admittedly, I have had great experience with Beretta's and currently have a JEG Beretta 687 20/28 combo, 686 20ga. However, my first sporting gun was a Browning GTi and it was great and I regret selling it to this day. I am considering the following:
Joel Etchen - 686 pro onyx 12ga, 30inch
JEG All around - 687 Pigeon 3 12ga, 30 inch
Beretta 690 Black
Blaser F16 - any thoughts on this gun, its something new and I am intrigued
Browning JEG all-around 12ga 30inch
Browning 725 Sporting

The Blaser is the most expensive and would be a splurge for a 14 year old. Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated. Am I missing any other options - I would consider used.
 

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I would recommend a 30 inch over/under. I think all of ones you mentioned would be fine, but instead of the Browning 725 Sporting I would recommend either the 725 Trap or XT trap.

I think the stock design of the trap models is much better than their sporting gun. The sporting stock is very narrow, with narrow comb and has a lot of recoil to me. The trap stock is wider and seems to kick less. I have found them to shoot about just above flat for me out of the box with a figure eight. I shoot a K-80 Pro on trap and skeet normally, but have shot borrowed XTs with good effect. You see quite a few on the sporting course actually.

As an aside, as a decent master class shooter(just finished tied for 12th in the K-Kup at nationals), certified instructor, and coach for the local college team I would really encourage him to master shooting crossing targets on a skeet field before moving into sporting clays. You need to have a solid understanding of how to shoot pass through, pull away, and sustained lead methods on a consistent target before trying to apply it to the varying distances and angles you see on a sporting course.
 

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Those are all good choices. Let him try as many as possible to see what fits him best.

West
 

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Looking at all the choices I would pick the Browning JEG all around gun. The deciding factor for me is that most of these models you listed don't have adjustable combs. Proper gun fit is crucial for success. I also like the parallel comb on the JEG gun and I'm assuming this gun is alittle heavier than a few of the guns you listed which would help with recoil and smooth movement. The true test is trying out the guns for yourself.

Let us know which gun you choose and best of luck!
 

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I would look at the Browning CX with adjustable comb. Probably the best buy out there. I also would consider Cesar Guerini.

Buster
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks, Guys! Based on the feedback, it looks like I should strongly consider a Browning. Is JEG a good place to be looking for a Browning? He has a new 725 trap in closeout for $2950 and the JEG all around tapered rib for $2950 and a good looking 725 pro trap for $3400. I definitely think an adjustable comb would be beneficial.

Whats the difference between the CX, XT and 725?

Kentucky Duke - he has not shot a high rib gun before, will this cause him any trouble transitioning between skeet and trap?
 

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Personally I would send your 682 out and have screw chokes put in it (maybe even in just the bottom barrel, that way he could do skeet and trap, and muddle through sporting).

If he sticks with shooting for the next 3-4 years (a VAST majority don't) THEN invest the money in a new gun. For now, except for the drawback of fixed chokes, the gun he has is MORE than sufficient.

You would be FAR better off investing in a Precision Fit Stock and having someone who knows what they're doing fit it to him, that way it can be adjusted with him as he grows over the next half dozen years.

Even ignoring everything I've said, you'd be better off just buying a new set of barrels and having them fit to your 682. That can be done for a grand or less, and you'd have one set of barrels for skeet, and another for trap/sporting. Although I think even this is unnecessary at this point.

Unless you have money to burn, I really don't see the point in investing in a new gun right now.
 

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Everyone is an individual, but I have no trouble going back an forth.

I can switch easily between high rib guns and low rib, not everyone can though. Try to find one you can shoot a bit first.
 

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Not everyone can shoot a high rib PERIOD. A number of shooters have tried, and tried hard to make them work (some top shooters have even switched sponsors because one pushed them into a high rib gun for marketing purposes and they couldn't make it work), and have gone back to flat ribs. A lot depends on how you visually acquire lead b/w the barrel and bird. I've always said that unless you KNOW you want a high rib, you don't want a high rib.

I shoot a 1/4" high rib on my gun, which is not as high as most of the all-around high rib guns, but it works quite well for me. I don't have any trouble going back to a flat rib, in fact I really don't notice much difference in sight picture either way except I can see around the gun/barrels a bit better with the higher rib, so it's easier to make a correction on the fly. Of course I shoot with a pretty high comb to begin with.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I did consider putting chokes in the 682, but I may just sell it or let my dad continue to use it for skeet. I think I purchased the gun 15+ years ago and my dad uses much more than me.
Any thoughts on those Browning options above from JEG? Other vendors to consider?
 

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Get the Beretta 687 pigeon 3. Best gun of the bunch. Just the fact that you can get different barrels fitted to it is a benefit over the Browning. We have dozens of people at our club shooting Beretta 680 series guns. Parts are easy to come by. Easy to find a gunsmith that can work on them, if something breaks. Which isn't often. Unless the kid beats it up, you'll be able to get your money out of it if you decide to sell it at a later date.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I was fairly set on a 680 series gun at the onset of my search - specifically, one of JEG 686 onyx pro's with 30 inch barrels and an adjustable comb. I do think the added weight of the Browning's would be beneficial and I know they are work horses as well. Based on appearances, the XT looks like it may be a better all around gun with its slightly lower rib than the 725 trap, but I am not nearly as educated on this stuff as the people on this forum. I believe the onyx pro's with 30 inch barrel in sporting weigh 7.4lbs.
 

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Personally I would send your 682 out and have screw chokes put in it (maybe even in just the bottom barrel, that way he could do skeet and trap, and muddle through sporting).

If he sticks with shooting for the next 3-4 years (a VAST majority don't) THEN invest the money in a new gun. For now, except for the drawback of fixed chokes, the gun he has is MORE than sufficient.
I think skeet_mans posts makes sense. If he tires of shooting later and moves on to something else, buying a gun that you know will resell without taking a hit in the pocketbook seems most logical. As he matures and if he stays active shooting and becomes competitive he can always upgrade. (speaking from my experience)


The Browning Citori CX is reasonably priced, bulletproof and will serve him well in all shotgun games

Eddie
 

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Have him shoot as many as he can, then get the one that fits HIM. I shoot Brownings because they are reliable guns and they fit me. I worked at a Facility that dealt (rented and sold) Beretta, I was able to shoot a lot of different models, all badly, they are reliable, just don't fit me. The only Browning I haven't been able to shoot are the humpbacks, great guns, but all I see when I shoulder them is the flat back of the receiver. I can't shoot high ribs, either all I see is the ramp. SO, shoot 'em all, buy something reliable that fits HIM.

The Browning Special Sporting Clays O/U is my go to for all things clays. It sounds like the CX/Crossover is the currently available equivalent.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I just spoke with Briley and they should be able to put thin wall chokes in the gun. They want to take a look at it first. Cost will be around $500 or $650 with extended chokes.

I am still not certain this is the direction I want to go, but it is a solid option.
 

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Spend your money on the CX keep it nice and if you decide to sell it later on you can recover most of your cost. Even if you have your Beretta choke tubed you won't recover your money.

Buster
 

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You don't need extended chokes, it would be a couple hundred less for flush fits.

At that price you'd be better off buying a second set of barrels that are already choked and having them fit. You should be able to find a set used for $600-$800, and new from $800-$1k, and a hundred or so for fitting.
 
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