Trapshooters Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,657 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
After reading the other thread on weight vrs porting I began to wonder about the weight side of the issue but didn`t want to hi-jack someone elses thread.Lets say on a single bbl trap gun if you were to add 6 oz of total weight would there actually be a reasonable difference in felt recoil sensation if weight was added at front of forearm,in grip area,or in middle of buttstock ? Same amount of weight added just in different areas.I know a person can over think little things in this game,but does one location have an advantage over another? Lets not worry about gun balance or swing ability..THANKS..John KS-OKIE.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,863 Posts
John, you old coot.

From a purely physics standpoint, it should not make any difference where you put the weight.

Tim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,340 Posts
KS-OKIE:

If we ignore gun balance and pointability, mass is mass. No matter where additional mass is added to a gun, the added mass increases inertia which soaks up recoil.

sissy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,024 Posts
The question referred to felt recoil. If you move the felt recoil from your face to your shoulder, the same amount of recoil can feel totally different. Thus the placement of the additional weight can make a difference. HMB
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,657 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Every time the subject of weight comes up I think of your hands on the gun.Your hands create 3 zones,in front of - in between - and behind.I bet your rear hand takes more of the felt recoil than the front so is it possible that you could be better served with the added weight between your hands? Again,just for this thought lets discount swing and center of balance.Not much to do today but watch a cold,dark,rainy, March day go buy..KS-OKIE.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,166 Posts
Sissy is correct mass is mass. Seems to me that all things being equal a heavier barreled gun kicks less than a gun with lighter barrels and a heavier receiver. not just my opinion the British observed this 100 or more years ago.

Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,782 Posts
Joe, wouldn't the heaviest barrels also have a tad less muzzle rise on firing than a lighter barrel? I think so yet the recoil to mass overall plays a huge part in less (felt) recoil.

Hap
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,984 Posts
the easiest way to accomplish is lose a few lbs of trapshooters love handles...then the gun will feel heavier...everything is relative.. and yes!..I are a fysix professer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
I think if you do the math my 12# gun has about 25% less recoil than a 8# gun. I also think shooters add weight in the wrong place, they add weight to the stock and tell me they like the lively feel and then proceed to shoot over targets. I think this causes most people to set up a shotgun that, because of the wippy feel, shoots to low. I know that Phil Kiners says 95% of the misses are low and in keeping score in league shooting I see most of the misses low. John 8703697
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,657 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
EuroJoe:I know that swing and balance are very important but I just wanted to address the weight issue.On my 682 Gold E the balance point is different with the wood stock than what it is with my PFS on it.With the PFS I seem to have a greater % of the guns weight between my hands.I just seem to have the feeling that my hands absorb more felt recoil with the PFS (I like that much better than feeling it on my shoulder).The thread about overthinking this game really hits the nail on the head here doesn`t it.I ask a simple question and right away my friends start calling me an "OLD COOT"...John.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,399 Posts
Mass is not Mass for all purposes if by that you mean that each measurement of gun movement is the same

A shotgun has rotational movement upwards because of the fixed nature of how it is anchored to the body

While mass may be mass for the fomulae of recoil alone which is M time V= recoil where you actually put the mass will change the vectors of force

Putting all the mass in the buttstock will make the gun move differently in recoil than if you put all the mass just behind the muzzle

It will change felt recoil depending on where you put the mass- the final numbers of recoil will be the same but the vectors to reach that calculation may be different

Regards from Iowa

Gene
 

·
Sponsors a Reloaders for Youth Program
Joined
·
11,971 Posts
I've had to pull the balance point of my gun back to just in front of the trigger. If the balance point is too far in front of the trigger, I can't seem to get to the target and I shoot low. Adding weight to the stock fixed this and decreased recoil - a happy coincidence.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top