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A question about all the Perazzi receivers, iron and barrels for sale?

What do you guys do with an extra receiver? Or are you building a complete gun?

Why do people take apart complete guns to the sell the individual pieces? Is a Perazzi worth more in parts than a complete gun?
 

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Most are building a complete gun, some are keeping them as backups. And yes, if you have the time and want to spend the effort, you can get quite a bit more money parting guns out than you can selling them as a whole, same goes for just about any assembled item that can be broken down into usable components (thats how junk yards made big $).
 

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Buying P gun parts allows you to be selective about the weight and length of barrels you prefer as well as how they're choked. Also, the style and finish of the receiver as well as the type of trigger. (fixed bottom first, fixed top first, ext selectable, etc) Many of us don't care if it's a "parts gun"....I put it together to shoot not trade or sell in many cases.
 

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Brownings and Berettas are not machined to the same tolerances that Perazzis are. All late Perazzis are so close to dimensionally identical they can be assembled rather than hand fit. That is not the case with serial numbers with fewer than six digits. Can't speak for Blazers and CGs, but my guess is they are too new and there are not many around.

When I decided to shoot higher ribbed barrels, I decided I wanted a 35/34 combo. I found a used MX-10RS with those barrels and the barrel weights were within 1/2 oz of each other. I already had a Perazzi and liked my nickel plated receiver. The 10-RS barrels fit my receiver perfectly, literally, so I swapped out the ejector rods so ejector timing would be correct and put them on my receiver.

I sold the receiver, iron and front wood to a gent who had a set of barrels he wanted to turn into a gun. I sold the trigger and the other parts I didn't want to others, who were happy to acquire them.

So I ended up with a different set of barrels for my gun, and didn't have to change anything else. I was a happy camper. I got to put together the exact gun I wanted, and sold the unwanted parts to others who were doing the same.
 

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Gary,

I haven't found a gun project that didn't get out of hand. LOL

It's only money.
 

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Did you know in car business, parts worth approximately 300~400% more than a complete vehicle?

Perazzi has more interchangeable configurations than most others, it's higher price makes it more sensible to buy parts to do your own modifications.
 

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Some seller's motto is: To make sure all Perazzis have non-matching numbers.
 

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The fact is a new Perazzi is an expensive toy. It is a whole lot easier to buy a receiver, then save up for a trigger, add a barrel and wood. Spreading the outlay over the course of months or years allows one to acquire a gun that is hard to buy when you need to lay out $7k or more all at once.

In terms of shooting performance, there really isn't a difference, so long as a competent gunsmith does the fitting. There is something about a numbers matching gun that is hard to explain. Important to some, not to others.
 

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I think matching numbers are great for an older Perazzi; necessary in fact. They really were hand fit.

I bought my current Perazzi new. It didn't have matching numbers. Why? Because I wanted a nickel plated, scalloped receiver, but insisted on an MX-15 barrel. So the dealer simply took the barrel off an MX-2000 and substituted an MX-15 barrel. It dropped right in and fit perfectly. I had a new gun just like I wanted it.

Later, I got tired of carrying two guns to every shoot, so I bought an O/U barrel for it from Giacomo. The only fitting he did was to time the ejectors. Everything else was perfect.

I eventually sold both those barrels and replaced them as I mentioned above. I rather like the fact that I can interchange components and reconfigure the gun if I wish. As long as I stay with six digit serial numbered parts, I can mix and match at will. I don't have the patience to go through what Gary did to get his perfect gun.
 
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