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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A older gentleman and I became friends about a year ago. One day out of the blue he asks if I want another shotgun. I asked why, the conversation took off - and I now own this.

Works for me.

It's a VH Grade 1 built in 1901, 30" full choke barrels. Over 10 years ago at a gun show he bought the barrels, receiver, trigger guard, etc. complete. I have no idea what happened to the original wood.

My friend also had a black walnut blank for which he said he paid "three fifty". Turns out he paid $3.50!
He then took the whole works to a local stock maker who knows Parkers, had an authentic VH in the shop plus a stock duplicator to produce a correct replacement stock with 14 1/4" LOP, hand-cut checkering and right hand cast-off. The barrels were rust blued by the same fellow.

I noticed there were two fine cracks on the right side of the wrist, so I took it to the same stock maker and he repaired them by inserting epoxy-coated pins lateral to the cracks. Very nice job. From the directions of the cracks he said it looked like it may have been in a soft case in a car trunk and something heavy put on top of it.

I fully realize this is no collector grade, but I don't care.
I'm in the process of confirming the chamber length and figuring out a reduced load for it.

The pics could be better, but you get the idea.
Parker 1.jpg
Parker 2.jpg
Parker 3.jpg
Parker 4.jpg
Parker 5.jpg
 

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Nice addition - I'm jealous!

I saw a neat trick (maybe here?) for confirming a 12-ga 2-3/4" chamber. You take an empty 12-ga hull and insert an empty 20-ga hull into it as far as it will go. If this rig will chamber in a 12-ga gun, then it has a 2-3/4" chamber.

I shoot a number of vintage trap guns (oldest is 1902, newest is 1930) in rotation at my two annual trap leagues. Everyone has their own opinions on this (of course), but my experience is that the older guns like lower pressures than you get with the modern "Gun Club" type loads. I have researched and developed a bunch of 1-oz low-pressure 16-yard trap loads for my guns (they all seem to want something a little different in the way of hulls, primers, etc.). My closest gun to yours would be my 1894 Remington FE trap double.

PM me if you would like any of my lower pressure loads - just let me know what kind of shooting you plan to do with your "new" gun. Also, I'm assuming the newly rust-blued barrels aren't Damascus?

Thanks, and good luck,

Tom
 

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That's a Purdy piece of wood for $3.50 plus fitting. I expect you need to use Black powder in this ole gun. You better do your homework as to what ammo you can use. Good Luck shooting that ole gun. Should be fun. break em all Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The barrels are not damascus, yay!
The chokes are pretty tight, all I had was a caliper and they miked no tighter than .690" - so I'm guessing they're actually .695" or so.

One of those times where it's better to be lucky than good.
 

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Very nice piece, those don't look like damascus barrels to me.

Pat
Me too, looks like what they called in the day Fluid Steel. In modern terms to a metallurgist wrought steel with various combinations of alloys. Brain treasure, who knows where the name Damascus steel originated?
 

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Me too, looks like what they called in the day Fluid Steel. In modern terms to a metallurgist wrought steel with various combinations of alloys. Brain treasure, who knows where the name Damascus steel originated?
Origin....Great Britain?....name comes from city of Damascus..or...looks like
Damask fabric.
 

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Partly correct. It did come from the city Damascus. The city where it originated is Damascus, Syria. The steel making process the Muslims used to make their knives and swords. Today Syria is leveled to rubbish from the war. Also today many custom knife makers use steel of this process. It is a tough steel when made into a knife or sword sharpens like a razor. It makes a pretty pattern on the blade when finished and polished and when barrels are made that way. Each piece of Damascus steel is like the snow flake, no two patterns are the same. I am not Paul Harvey but that is the rest of the story. Thanks for replying.
 

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Nice , very nice ! Yes , in 2 of the pictures you can see the fixed crack , but your "guy " did a great job repairing it . I would take that gun out in woods any day ,either for hunting or sporting clays
 

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Now that is a fine gift! As long as the 'smith is truly knowledgeable about Parkers, he should be able to ensure that this one is safe to shoot. Most important is whether the barrels are tight to the face of the receiver. You can shoot modern ammo in it but I would stick with lighter loads. There is one small company that manufactures specialty loads for older shotguns that are low-pressure but work well. The company is RST and the ammo is loaded in Pennsylvania. You can order them direct.

I have owned several Parkers and have shot Remington 1-oz loads in them with not one bit of worry. Those guns are built well and Parker used good steel. Unless it was damaged in some way [not knowing its history before your friend purchased the metal] it should be fine. Just check with the gunsmith for his opinion. Enjoy!!

Scott Hanes
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Now that is a fine gift! As long as the 'smith is truly knowledgeable about Parkers, he should be able to ensure that this one is safe to shoot. Most important is whether the barrels are tight to the face of the receiver. You can shoot modern ammo in it but I would stick with lighter loads. There is one small company that manufactures specialty loads for older shotguns that are low-pressure but work well. The company is RST and the ammo is loaded in Pennsylvania. You can order them direct.

I have owned several Parkers and have shot Remington 1-oz loads in them with not one bit of worry. Those guns are built well and Parker used good steel. Unless it was damaged in some way [not knowing its history before your friend purchased the metal] it should be fine. Just check with the gunsmith for his opinion. Enjoy!!

Scott Hanes
The barrels are tight to the receiver, although the lever is just left of center.
I purchased a roll crimper a couple weeks back and am pulling together what I need to load some low-pressure fodder in some Federal paper hulls I have.
 
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