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I shot in a small tournament this weekend, fifty 16 yard and then 50 handicap targets. I shot a 49 on the singles. The targets were orange against a bright blue sky so I wore my CMT lenses and they did a great job. This is a desert location near a popular off roading area and by the time the first handicap round was shot, which I was on, the air had become filled with a hazy dust, almost like a low lying fog. It was still very bright and I didn't think a thing of staying with the CMT lenses. I shot an abysmal handicap score. At the time I thought I was seeing the targets well and the problem was me. After I finished my handicap rounds I put my shooting glasses away and joined my friend on the scoring chair, wearing a pair of orange-brown lenses in some shooting glasses I mostly use for driving in. What a shock that was. Even from back at about 32 or so yards the birds just looked easy. It took me a while to figure it out but the CMT lenses were all wrong during the handicap. The sky was bright but no longer blue. I was seeing the vertical and horizontal motion of the targets but none of the depth. The wrong lense color was causing me to miss a full third of the information I needed to know what the targets were doing.

The point is that our choice of lense colors can hurt us as much as help, so don't be cavalier about your lense colors.
 

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My choices are limited to clear, or clear.
 

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<blockquote><I>"I was seeing the vertical and horizontal motion of the targets but none of the depth."</I></blockquote>

Why is it necessary to see target depth to hit them?

People who shoot with one eye never read depth no matter what lens color they use.

There was something else going on because of your lens color.

MK
 

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One eyed shooters have been doing that for a long time. Suddenly losing perceived depth perception for a two eyed shooter will cause problems until you learn to adapt to it.


Eric
 

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Everyone has different color perceptions, especially men, women are much better at sorting out color hues.

TimB99, I'd hafta guess since your lens color choices are clear and clear, you don't have many color blind problems as a lot on men do?

Any tint added to lens cuts vision compared to clear with some exceptions in the color blindness in men. Background color, dust, smog, vegetation and many other factors play a role in the lens color selection processes depending on colors one may be lacking in. The CMT lens Doug "thought" was right was, for the brightest conditions.

Finding a set of lens colors best suited for most shooting situations is a search of searches! When Mother Nature goes dark, go clear, depending on the clay colors and your ability to clearly see that color in artificial light. For those reasons, no one can advise another of which color is best!!

Hap
 

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We had a boy on our School Team buy some Ranger glasses/lenses. He couldn't tell the difference from one lens color to another. He ended up getting clear lenses for his Ranger frames. He could only tell the difference between the darker and lighter lenses.

I've always had problems with the colors "they" say i should be using. I always try and choose my lens color myself not long before taking the line. I can relate on choosing one that works for one event and not the next.

Matt
 

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Red-green color blindness to some degree is the most common among men.

Any lens that adds color to the visual image also reduces brightness to some extent; reducing brightness reduces visual acuity and clarity.

MK
 

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Similar experience this weekend shooting orange targets against a hillside covered in snow. The dark purple that work so well for me most of the time just didn't cut it against a white background. I could not see a "clear and distinct" target until they got up into the tree line (handicap range for 16s, back fence + for handicaps). After shooting I watched others shoot and used every pair of lenses on both sets of my shooting glasses without finding any tint that really worked.

--- Chip King ---
 

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Chipper, did you also notice more target streaking or target long tails too under those conditions? Orange and white don't mix well together for me!!

Hap
 

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Hap they looked like all tail until they got up against the tree line just one big long orange streak. I'm going to buy some copper polarized for my XLWs and see how they do next week if we still have snow there.

--- Chip King ---
 

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I have had problems you have had with depth perception with the cmt lens. It has to be very bright and clear background.
I try to use the lens that allows the most light and high lights the target against the background. I now take more lens than types of shells and chokes combined.
 

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Don't hesitate to make a change in lense color as the day progresses and conditions change. If nothing else pull a few lenses out and hold them up and watch a few targets. One color will be better than the others.
 

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To my eyes there is no better lens than the CMT when the sky is clear blue and bright sun but when those two things change every so slightly they are as bad as they get. I now use dark purple and tangerine for those cloudy days.
 

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Depth is a non-issue. Everyone, whether using two eyes or one, uses the same visual cues to judge depth at Trap distances.
 

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I have heard that the CMT's can hurt your shooting if its not a REAL Bright and Sunny day. Wireguy learned the hard way, so we don't have too. Better luck next time Wireguy!!! Break-em all. Jeff
 

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A very good shooter offered me a tip on lense color recently. What ever the color you choose should be just dark enough to prevent you from squinting.
 

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Those of us with red/green color blindness may have trouble seeing targets well with most lens colors. For me, the only color that highlights the targets is Vermillion. I have the standard tint for most shooting and a lighter tint for dusk and under the lights shooting.

Chris
 

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not to Hijack the thread but I have been struggling this winter (league) shooting H Cap against bright white snow backgrounds! The birds seem invisible!! been shooting with my dark and lighter vermillion.....sugestions??
 
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