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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm following a thread on Facebook where several Beretta 692 owners, so far all "Sporter"models not "trap" models, are reporting the top tang bolt breaking between 10,000 - 15,000 rounds. Does this sound typical? Does anyone know if Beretta has plans to address this? I was looking at a 692 Trap with the Bfast comb, but now...???...
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Not really a bolt but rather an M4x.70 metric machine screw. Same size and design used in all previous 680 series guns. Interesting! Maybe some bad screws? They can be tough to get out and often require heat. I have seen a few broken when some one just tried to strong arm them without applying heat, so they do break with enough force applied. However, the hump, as shown in the one photo, that is threaded to receive the screw, fits into a notch on the top tang. It is designed to take all lateral force produced in recoil. I.e., there is no clear way lateral force can be put on the screw under normal shooting conditions. Very strange.
 

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My guess would be loose woodwork, which in turn would allow rotation of the stock downwards during recoil and breaking the screw in tension.

But as I say, my guess.

DT
 

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The 692 is missing the screw that attached the trigger assy to the frame on the bottom of the action. Looks like too much stress relying on one screw in an area that receives rotational stress when opening and closing. My guess is the ultimate solution is/will be to install said screw so there is a two-point attachment b/w the trigger assy and receiver if possible. Definitely a design flaw.
 

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It happened to a friend of mine in Birmingham earlier this year. It was a sporting clays gun.
He took it back to the dealer; they called Beretta. Beretta gave him a new gun.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
So far it's only the Sporters, not the Trap model that I've heard of this happening. Odd.
 

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methinks Ian has hit the nail on the head.

I have two early 682's with over 100,000 rounds each. The front trigger-plate tangs fit so tight that I have to use a brass hammer to work them loose. With the older hand fitted 682's the screw might not be a big deal, but with the newer mass produced guns I can see that any play in the tang would transfer all the force to the rear screw.

Looks like Beretta tried to save a few bucks by deleting the "unnecessary" front trigger plate screw and it will cost them a lot more in the long run.

Michael
 

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The 692 is missing the screw that attached the trigger assy to the frame on the bottom of the action. Looks like too much stress relying on one screw in an area that receives rotational stress when opening and closing. My guess is the ultimate solution is/will be to install said screw so there is a two-point attachment b/w the trigger assy and receiver if possible. Definitely a design flaw.
Very good! It would seem to be a very plausible answer as to why the breakage happens!
 

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The 692 is missing the screw that attached the trigger assy to the frame on the bottom of the action. Looks like too much stress relying on one screw in an area that receives rotational stress when opening and closing. My guess is the ultimate solution is/will be to install said screw so there is a two-point attachment b/w the trigger assy and receiver if possible. Definitely a design flaw.
Is this the screw you mean? If so I think you are spot on. A real weakness if you are prone to slamming your gun shut. Obviously we trappies are a little more sympathetic when it comes to gun handling :) Well done Beretta. Top job!!

TD
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I thought the Sporting Clays model has been in production for a considerably longer time than the Trap model ?
I don't know, but I bet someone will tell us for sure. I wonder if the design was improved to eliminate this weakness in the Trap model? Maybe someone who has a Trap model could take a look?
 
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