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Would a 28ga 3/4 oz shot shoot the same pattern @30yds as a 12ga 3/4 oz shot @30yds?Same barrel,same speed,same choke?
 

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Well, first off, I am an Alabama Red-Neck; not "Dr. Science". All I can tell you is, I have loaded and shot 3/4 oz. 12-ga loads as well as 3/4 oz 28-ga loads. My average scores are better with the 28. However, on any given day, I can shoot worse with it........
 

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Tracy, Barrel length means nothing. Yes, You can match the size of the pattern, by trying to change the 12 ga. chokes until you get the same proper size pattern that the 28 ga. pattern produces (at any given distance). But "No" You will not get the same even pattern density that you seem to always get with the 28 ga. The shot, after shot, even pellet density produced by the 28 gauge is unmatched by any other gauge shotgun that I know about period, end of story. break em all. Jeff
 

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the shot string on a 28ga gun is longer than a 12ga guns shot string.
 

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the shot string on a 28ga gun is longer than a 12ga guns shot string.
I've heard that for years too, but I've never seen anything that conclusively proves it.
 
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*IF* the 28ga threw better patterns, then ALL international competitors would be using them with fast 7/8's loads for competition... But they don't. End of day, bigger bore = better patterns in almost any situation. BUT it requires a good wad for the payload and velocity desired.

For folks that *regularly* shoot their 28's with 3/4oz better than their 12's with 3/4oz, I would suggest that: 1) the fit/weight/swing-dynamics of their 28 suits them better than their 12's does; or 2) their 12ga 3/4 load is of inferior construction; and quite possibly it's a combination of both factors...
 

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Hello: I have been playing around with the 12 gauge 3/4oz load for about a year. You have to find the right combo and pattern them to make them work well for your shooting game. Choke selection, shot size and speed have a lot to do with it. As for patterns compared to the 28 gauge, they can be made the same. Shot string is something else again. There is something special about the 28 gauge maybe it is the square load or just saying "I am shooting a 28 gauge". Thanks, Eric
 

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Jack, What constitutes a better pattern to you??? I'd like to know!!! break em all. Jeff

Because the less shot your gun throws the smaller the optimum pattern size your gun will have!!! Its just Physics 101!!!! 12 ga. is about 30-31 inches, a 20 ga. is about 27-28 inches, 28 ga. is 24-26 inches, while the 410 bore is like 18 inches. Patterns larger than I have listed will start to have holes in them. Again that's just Physics 101 Ideally you want to shoot a pattern size that's listed above at whatever yardage your trying to break/shoot birds at. That's why we have chokes right to keep a given size pattern at different distances correct!!! What you can't fix is how evenly the pellet distribution is around the entire pattern diameter. This is where the 28 ga. shines better than any other gauge period!!!! They produce a totally even pellet distribution around the entire pattern with almost no holes ever!!! There is no hot core like in the 12 ga with a weak outer ring. If you hit the target dead center or on the outside edge the targets will still boil when it breaks. There is no weak outer ring as it were. Break em all. Jeff
 

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Jack, What constitutes a better pattern to you??? I'd like to know!!! break em all. Jeff

Because the less shot your gun throws the smaller the optimum pattern size your gun will have!!! Its just Physics 101!!!! 12 ga. is about 30-31 inches, a 20 ga. is about 27-28 inches, 28 ga. is 24-26 inches, while the 410 bore is like 18 inches. Patterns larger than I have listed will start to have holes in them. Again that's just Physics 101 Ideally you want to shoot a pattern size that's listed above at whatever yardage your trying to break/shoot birds at. That's why we have chokes right to keep a given size pattern at different distances correct!!! What you can't fix is how evenly the pellet distribution is around the entire pattern diameter. This is where the 28 ga. shines better than any other gauge period!!!! They produce a totally even pellet distribution around the entire pattern with almost no holes ever!!! There is no hot core like in the 12 ga with a weak outer ring. If you hit the target dead center or on the outside edge the targets will still boil when it breaks. There is no weak outer ring as it were. Break em all. Jeff
Jeff,

Simple answer is the one with the most uniform (and it's going to be essentially Gaussian) distribution of effective pellet density at the stated distance.

Your statement on decreasing pattern diameters v gauge is confusing. What if I shoot 1oz in my 12 then switch to 1-1/8th? Moreover, you don't list any distances other than saying "the distance you want to shoot at," so what you wrote is essentially meaningless for comparison. And then why are the conventional pattern standards for all gauges except 410 all expressed as pellet percentages inside a 30" circle at 40 yards? Again, this historical standard would seem to conflict with your statement. (410 is an anomalie and patterns are generally expressed as the same percentages as the larger bores at 25 yards instead of 40.)

Now if you had stated something like, for a given payload regardless of gauge, you want some X-diameter pattern at your desired shooting distance, that might be something more meaningful to discuss -- but I'd ask for the science to back up those stated "ideal payload pattern diameters" ...

Peace-out,

Jack
 

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Jack, My size patterns are all posted on the NSSA rule book. They have the proper size pattern for each gauge. Also listed is the max shot allowed. They also have the proper handicaps per one hundred targets for each gauge. So say I shoot the 28 gauge and you shoot the 12 ga. at the same Skeet Targets for a 100 targets event. I would get x number of targets as my handicap because of your larger 12 ga. This number would be less if you used the 20 ga. instead. Now of course we both would have to be in the same class. Otherwise there is another handicaping of targets to adjust for classes if everyone is using the same gauge.

My point was and is if your shooting a 410 at say 21 yards you would use a skeet choke to achieve this 18 inch pattern size, but at say 35 yards you may need a full choke to achieve the same 18 inch pattern size. No choke made would help your pattern at say 60 yards, because it is impossible to keep the 18 size pattern at that distance.If you find one let me know!!! Other than trying different chokes,wads, or type of shot there is little that can be done to improve the pellet density inside the pattern. Over-boring and reducing the forcing cones has helped the 12 ga. barrels pattern density more than any wad,shot, or choke ever could. Now if you don't believe me, on pattern size??? Just get a NSSA rule book. break em all. Jeff

PS If you switch over shooting a 1 oz. of shot in your 12. ga. compared to shooting a 1 1/8 oz. of shot in your 12 ga. all you lose it pellet count in your pattern size. The size should remain the same. If you lose enough pellet count you must use a smaller pattern size to keep the pellet count high enough to keep from having holes in your pattern. Pattern density is just how the pellets are spread around in your pattern(spread can be even and still have holes). So if you try to use a 30 inch pattern size with 3/4 oz of shot in your shell, your pattern will have lots of holes in it, because of the low pellet count. So you can use smaller shot to add to your pellet count to fix this, or use a smaller size pattern. I like using one oz of 8 1/2 shot so that my pellet count is the same as if I used 1 1/8 oz of #8 shot(but my recoil is lighter). Its all the same, but I give up shot size, and with that some pellet energy when it hits the target. At 16 yards I feel the 8 1/2/'s have more than enough energy so I don't worry about it, but if I like to use only 7 1/2 size shot, my pattern because of low pellet count may not encounter holes in the pattern on a regular basis forcing me to close the pattern size by going to a tighter choke. From say my Mod. to a Imp. Mod. Its that or live with the small moving holes in my pattern. I hope this answers your question. break em all. Jeff
 

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Joe, Your not alone on that one!!! It more common than you think. The lack of recoil and excellent patterns help keep your head on the gun and eye on the target better. break em all. Jeff
 
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