Trapshooters Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
719 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am looking to by a 3 inch 1100. I've been offered one in good shape but am wondering about some things. The barrel is marked 3 inch but the receiver doesn't have MAGNUM stamped on it. I thought they were identified on the receiver. If its a standard receiver with a 3 inch barrel will it and is it safe to shoot 3 inch shells? Any body know how long the ejection port should be on a 3 inch? I need your advice.
the buttstock has a plastic plate, didn't the mag have a recoil pad?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,917 Posts
I would have thought the reciever would have been marked "Magnum", but there really isn't any difference in a mag or regular reciever. Ejection port is the same. One difference is the action bar is heavier on the magnum, at least it was on the older guns. I couldn't tell a magnum action bar from another unless I had one to compare it to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,103 Posts
The two that I have both have the receiver stamped. Years ago (mid 70's) a Remington rep told me that all Trap and Skeet receivers (12ga) were built on the Magnum receiver which was designed for heavier duty than the field grade receiver. May have been a change of policy in later years, mayby not. I would prefer to see the receiver stamped Magnum just in case there is a difference. Marc
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,278 Posts
Except for very, very early 2-3/4" guns, the standard, magnum and target receivers are all the same. As noted above, the difference is the action sleeve.

It is possible to install a 3" magnum barrel on a standard action. But, without a heavy magnum action sleeve, the bolt velocity will be too high, and this will result in battering of the action and eventual breakage of something, including possibly cracking the action.

The one exception are the special steel shot barrels. These are specifically marked as being designed for steel shot. These barrels can be installed on a standard action and can safely fire 3" STEEL magnums, but NOT 3" LEAD magnums.

I'm not aware of trap 1100s coming from the factory with a magnum action sleeve. However, one of the softest shooting trap guns ever are magnum receivers (with magnum action sleeve, of course) and a trap barrel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,063 Posts
My two 1100 trap guns are built up like Brian said.........magnum action slide, Jack West stock, Hastings trap barrel and my Auto-Buster recoil system. You can shoot it on the bridge of your nose.

Ken Rucker
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,063 Posts
My two 1100 trap guns are built up like Brian said.........magnum action slide, Jack West stock, Hastings trap barrel and my Auto-Buster recoil system. You can shoot it on the bridge of your nose.

Ken Rucker
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
The difference between the magnum style inertia sleeve and the standard sleeve is not enough to make an abuse issue out of use with a magnum barrel and light sleeve. I am not saying that more velocity and/or impact of parts may be a function, but there is not a level that can be considered as abuse. The bolt velocity is not "too high". That being said, I do agree that any reduction of bolt slamming that does not cut reliability is fine with me, but what is extra vs. what is abusive?

The heavier sleeve was designed with more mass (inertia) to allow a bolt/action slide system assembly to have enough remaining inertia once the gas seals had cleared the cylinder and were no longer accelerated by vented gas through one hole in the magnum barrel. Remington did expect more gas volume/pressure available at the port to make the use of one vent viable vs. the need for 2 vent ports in standard barrels to cycle the variety of 2-3/4" loads expected to function. That is also why certain 2-3/4" barrels had only one hole due to the expectation that only high brass shells would be utilized in that scenario. Thus, one hole is in the 2-3/4" duck/goose 34" barrel.

It is easier to say that the lighter 2-3/4" sleeve allows more bolt velocity since a lighter part can be accelerated faster, but the heavy part in place will be more likely to keep going due to greater inertia. That makes magnum guns more reliable than if they had a lighter sleeve that could be accelerated more, but fail to carry out the stroke, if used in magnum gun situations. The heavier sleeve is for reliability, not to slow the bolt.

The final word on abuse possibilities can be determined by this explanation: standard 2-3/4" barrels use 2 gas holes to push the bolt/action slide assembly cycle, and do this with everything from 1 oz. to a turkey 2-3/4" load (max. is now 1-5/8 oz.) without being considered as abuse-type use by the owner, since the factory does not tell shooters to avoid that use in those standard guns.

Therefore, if 2 holes with a lighter sleeve being vented with the 1-5/8oz. load is not abuse to a non-magnum gun, how can one hole magnum barrels with a 2 oz. load pushing whatever sleeve is in place be considered as abuse or possibly cause frame cracking? Frame cracks occur due to LOOSE barrels from magazine caps being incompletely tightened, sometimes due to cap detents that fail to allow the cap to be easily turned to the snug barrel position. The shooter thinks the cap is tight and then shoots the gun that way. Very similar to a sticky galled thread on a lug nut that makes it seem as if it is tight, but the wheel wobbles on the hub.

Take a look at the light inertia sleeves used on 11/87 Supermag guns. A 3-1/2" shell with 2 gas holes gives those sleeves a push, and a standard 3" 11/87 does not use a magnum 1100 sleeve, either.

Kirby
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,533 Posts
Put a skeet barrel on a magnum receiver, and it works dandy. Only problem was I had to use a spacer in the stock after replacing the rubber pad with a Morgan. Since the stock was kind of rumpled in the back from years of laying in a skiff, it just adds to the mystique.

Beware the Mud Gun, it will defeat you!

HM
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top