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For you that do not like the 30" barrel on the comp syn. I got a Remington 1100 comp syn for Christmas. took the barrel off and sold it the first day on trapshooters. Put my skeet barrel on the shotgun and headed to the range. This is the softest shooting shotgun I have ever had. Picked up a 28" sporting barrel with remchokes, target contour, the gun has good balance with both barrels. I have 4 nice over/under, krieg, browning, Remington, beretta. they are all nice guns, but this comp syn setup is great. maybe Remington will catch on sooner or later. John Ellis
 

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When I first got mine I didn't like my pro-bore barrel ether. But after thinking about Remington's advertizing about the gun being optimized for light loads I spent some time at the patterning board with different loads and chokes.

Now I have found that I can shoot 7/8oz. and 1oz. loads just as effectively as my old 1 1/8oz. loads with greatly reduced recoil.

Mine has become my go to sporting clays gun. For me I think the gun needs a higher rib to be effective for trap, I'm working on that now. That being said for the $980.00 I paid it is an excellent performer and would recomend it to anybody.
 

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The original 1100 comp was underrated. The biggest improvements were the nickel teflon coatings on the receiver, bolt carrier, bolt, rings & mag tube. Also the backboring which was a big leap for Remington. The newest synthetic 1100 comp is catching on slowly. The West/Rucker recoil system is a winner as is the 4 way adj. comb. The only thing they changed from the original comp's that I don't prefer are the bolts, which was probably to reach a price point. The biggest improvement they could make is a better trigger system. I use a Timney pull. They are soft shooters that are reliable to a point like any other semi-auto. Parts can & will break, however you can fix an 1100 on your own 99% of the time vs the very highly publicized and promoted 390, 391 & 400. They are a different story. They also are more pricey.

I've used the original 30" barrel since they came out. What was it 2005 or 2006?
I don't recall. It's always been good for me although a lot of other shooters have opted for the 28" light contour with Remchokes. I'll give that a whirl and see how it shakes out.

You can take it to the trap, skeet & sporting clays range with success.
Serious trapshooters might want to pursue an aftermarket rib if they prefer a higher point of impact.

Bottom line is for the money, the Remington 1100 Competition is worthwhile. It's also made in America.
 

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If you can find one the Hastings Hi-Rib trap barrel turns this setup into an effective trap gun.

vatrap
 

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Mine with a Hastings flat rib 28" barrel and the custom tennis grip tape wrapped around to provide not just a better grip but also a palm swell.

dickgtax_2008_0303_162.jpg

 

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Interesting. I picked one up on trade a few weeks ago. This one was totally tricked out with a Jack West synthetic stock/ Gra-coil and custom high rib. I sold it on Monday and the new owner called this morning and reported it's the softest auto loader he's ever shot, works perfectly with 1oz. reloads and he may be selling his KX-5 as a result. He absolutely loves shooting it. Great recommendation!!
 

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I have one and agree with everybody above. I am with Remington on the 30" barrel--that's what most people (including me) want. One comment above I totally agree with and wish Remington would wise up about is a higher rib---maybe about 3/8" higher that their standard. To me, it's not about higher POI, it's about shooter fit. I have never handed my gun to any seasoned shooter whether skeet or trap that did not say the rib was too low. I agree and intend to put a Add-On on mine before spring shooting. One very fine gun!!!
 

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I agree with everything above.. I have been shooting one for two years now and find no fault with the gun or the company. I have had issues and Remington absolutely took care of me about 150%...... Larry
 

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An old thread, I know.

I am having trouble getting the comb low enough for my cheek bone & eye relationship.
It SEEMS to be because the metal bosses in the comb that the posts fit into are a little bit proud of the black plastic comb's bottom surface.
I feel that it should be possible to drop the comb all the way down to a zero gap.

Anyone else notice this ? If so what cure(s) have you tried ?
 

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An old thread, I know.

I am having trouble getting the comb low enough for my cheek bone & eye relationship.
It SEEMS to be because the metal bosses in the comb that the posts fit into are a little bit proud of the black plastic comb's bottom surface.
I feel that it should be possible to drop the comb all the way down to a zero gap.

Anyone else notice this ? If so what cure(s) have you tried ?
Interesting, I couldn't get the rib high enough or enough right cast. I had to make new higher pins and a new comb to get the height up and enough cast. This just shows us how different our faces are. Remington probably just tries to make a common middle of the road fit?
 

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Interesting, I couldn't get the rib high enough or enough right cast. I had to make new higher pins and a new comb to get the height up and enough cast. This just shows us how different our faces are. Remington probably just tries to make a common middle of the road fit?
Couldn't get the rib high enough ?
The rib on mine isn't adjustable, I was talking about not being able to get the comb low enough.
Maybe that amounts to the same thing, i.e. can't get the eye down to the rib's plane ?
This is not just me, a fellow shooter tried it on Saturday and couldn't get his eye low enough either.

As to middle of the road;
The whole POINT of having an adjustable comb is so that it CAN fit (almost) anyone's/everyone's face.

Right now I am seriously considering (first MARKING it, then) taking it to a belt sander to remove 1/8 inch or so off the bottom of the comb.

I have drilled out (more like "cleaned out") the plastic to ensure that the posts aren't getting stopped by stray plastic beyond the bosses/bushings. A removed post can be inserted all the way to its shoulder, i.e. where the thread starts.

PS It isn't as if I (or the other shooter that tried it on Saturday) have a HUGE amount of face fat that has to be compressed over the comb.
Not emaciated, but not what the majority of people would call "Fat" either in the face or anywhere - we are almost skinny by trap shooter standards<Grin>
 

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Couldn't get the rib high enough ?
The rib on mine isn't adjustable, I was talking about not being able to get the comb low enough.
Maybe that amounts to the same thing, i.e. can't get the eye down to the rib's plane ?
This is not just me, a fellow shooter tried it on Saturday and couldn't get his eye low enough either.

As to middle of the road;
The whole POINT of having an adjustable comb is so that it CAN fit (almost) anyone's/everyone's face.

Right now I am seriously considering (first MARKING it, then) taking it to a belt sander to remove 1/8 inch or so off the bottom of the comb.

I have drilled out (more like "cleaned out") the plastic to ensure that the posts aren't getting stopped by stray plastic beyond the bosses/bushings. A removed post can be inserted all the way to its shoulder, i.e. where the thread starts.

PS It isn't as if I (or the other shooter that tried it on Saturday) have a HUGE amount of face fat that has to be compressed over the comb.
Not emaciated, but not what the majority of people would call "Fat" either in the face or anywhere - we are almost skinny by trap shooter standards<Grin>

My error in writing. I meant to say I couldn't get the comb high enough nor the comb with enough cast . With the comb all the way down, all I see is the back of the receiver.
 

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It is usually easier to grind a bit off the post height then to start sanding the comb.

I would start there first.

Its All Good
West
 

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bought one for sporting clays , shot one round and enjoyed it . haven't shot since . should think about moving it out of the safe .
 

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It is usually easier to grind a bit off the post height then to start sanding the comb.

I would start there first.

Its All Good
West
Thanks, but I have verified that the posts can go all the way in,
i.e. if I measure the comb hole depths with the removed posts they go in a bit past the shoulder where the threads start.
I really think the bushings aren't in far enough and since they are probably set with f/glass resin I have no chance of driving them in more.
I want to at least grind them to the level of the comb's bottom and maybe take a bit off that whole bottom surface.
If I use a belt sander I should be able to tell when I start to grind the black stuff, by smell as well as color.
I suppose I could go too far and the next problem would be the ramps at each end, or the posts bottoming out.

I shall proceed with caution.
 
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