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Yet another proposed Illinois BAN

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by halfmile, Oct 16, 2007.

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  1. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    In Wisconsin a youngster has to reach his 12th birthday at some point in the hunting season to attend Hunter Safety.

    I personally believe there is merit to this system. After seeing a diminutive 10 year old tottering down the walk with a CLOSED full size Beretta O/U held up in the air with difficulty, our club enacted a rule that juvenile shooters must have a hunter safety certificate.

    I personally feel your objection is not valid. There is a minimum age for driving, I hear no objection.

    Sounds somewhat like Little League Syndrome.

    HM
     
  2. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    you have to be 12 to legally shoot a gun here in NY
     
  3. smokerz

    smokerz TS Member

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    I took my 9 year old grandson out to the gun club this past summer. He can't even hold a 20 ga gun up, has no clue, and is bviously too young to participate in or understand a firearms safety course. What's the problem with age 12?
     
  4. Sgt. Mike

    Sgt. Mike TS Member

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    By age 10 I had been shooting for a couple of years. First I had a BB and pellet gun, then a .410 and by third grade I graduated to a 20 gauge. Safety was paramount from my parents. The guns were stored in a locker in the garage and I was not allowed to touch them without my dad being with me.

    Even at the younger years my parents had the perfect discipline. "Son, you have not been good today. We are going hunting and you are not going with us". Then dad came home with phesants and I wasn't even allowed to help clean them. Then just for an added measure he went out later to clean his gun and I couldn't go and help.

    This for me was the worst discipline I could imagine. It didn't take many times to get the point across. If I would have been forced to wait until 10 or 12 I would have found other interests. I learned discipline early. Michael
     
  5. Bawana

    Bawana TS Member

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    Here in Va I started to shoot at age 8. I showed alot of skill and my father talked a instructor to to see if I was good enough to enter the NRA cource. He was impressed. I started the NRA cource at age 10 when you had to be 14. I finished at age 13 sooner if I did not go to summer camp. Handling guns has to be decided by the way the kids act around them. How they shoot and so on. I have seen kids at age 10 handle a gun very well and others who should not be around them till later in life. Teach them early and teach them right.
     
  6. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

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    As a life long resident of Illinois I see both sides of this argument, I think 10 is to young for a child to be involved in the shooting sports. Size, strenght and focus are all factors to consider.
     
  7. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

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    As a life long resident of Illinois I see both sides of this argument, I think 10 is to young for a child to be involved in the shooting sports. Size, strenght and focus are all factors to consider.
     
  8. JDS

    JDS TS Member

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    This is why "I" will never spend a penny in a "ANTI-GUN" state.
     
  9. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    I shot my first skeet when I was 8. Back in the days of paper shells and common sense.

    I generally use the threshold of weight (75 lbs) and maturity, not age.

    As has been said before, there are safe 7 year olds, and unsafe 50 year olds!
     
  10. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Coach, correct. However as ar as regulation is concerned it would have to be on an age basis. It seems to me the State of Wisconsin determined age 12 as the point where a relatively high percentage of younguns would have the weight and maturity necessary to be safe.

    I realise many are ok at earlier ages, My own son was shooting at age 8 under close supervision. Unfortunately not all parents would be that conscientious.

    Allowing age ten to be the basemark would create a higher number of unsafe situations in my opinion.

    You can bring a 6 year old into your deer stand alongside you with no problem. He can even carry his BB gun. It's just that the DNR determined 12 to be the age for Hunter Safety eligibility. Shooting on private land, accompanying in the woods, no problem

    I have not heard one complaint about it in the 40 some years it has been a requirement.

    HM
     
  11. Marco Polo

    Marco Polo TS Member

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    As a 20 year veteran of the ILL Hunter Safety Education Program, at meetings of the instructors, we have discussed the problem of young kids taking the hunter safety classes. Many instructors recommended that we set a minimum age to take the classes at 10-12. We have all had families come to the classes with a group of kids and the parents spring on us kids as young as 5-6- or 7. These kids can and do pass the written test, BUT, I BELIEVE THAT THEY DO NOT RETAIN MUCH OF WHAT WE TEACH. I do not want a kid out there with a gun that "learned" when he was 6 or 7. <br>

    The FEDS who pay much of the cost of these classes have no age limits and we as instructors can't set an age limit. This must come from the state or the feds. The only way that we can fail a very young kid is when, in the practical part of the class, the child can't safety handle the guns that we shoot. Then we are able to tell the parents that the kid will not be allowed to pass the class and should take it again when he/she is older and better able to understand the content and handle the guns. <bR>
    Youngsters who have PASSED the hunter safety class can hunt ALONGSIDE or under DIRECT CONTROl of their parents or an adult hunter WITHOUT a FOID CARD. They do not need a FOID card UNLESS they are hunting on their own.
     
  12. Gargoyle!

    Gargoyle! TS Member

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    Lets put it this way. We have kids, they grow. Before school we sit down and read to them getting them ready for school. Why can't we do the same with our kids before they hunt and or go to the Hunting Classes. We should because that would keep the class safe for all. I say size age and maturity are all important to say when they start. Ill is just trying to get rid of all guns any way they can. If they can keep the kids from enjoying the sport and brain wash them in class then they will win as a new gen grows up.

    I will never understand why the ATA went to an anti gun state to have the Grand. To me thats like the lamb going in to the lion den to say HI. Mark my words we will get screwed by Ill at some point or another.
     
  13. W.P.T.

    W.P.T. TS Member

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    This has to be taken on an individual basis to be fair to every one of the kids, some can handle it, some cannot and in this case size matters ... I started shooting about the age of 9 or 10, but I was a big kid, today I am still a big kid at 59 ... WPT ... YAC) ...
     
  14. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Marco Polo- You lamented about youngsters passing a test but not later retaining much of the knowledge they had when they passed the test. That observation could be confirmed for older students as well. I am sure I would be embarrasses to see my results if I took a Calculus test now.

    Pat Ireland
     
  15. richrob

    richrob TS Member

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    I actually took the Illinois hunter safety course this spring. I feel that I could have passed the test the moment I walked in the door, if you have common sense and are responsible its fine.

    As far as the course goes, there were several younger children who were not ready and were not there the second day. There were also several younger children who clearly were ready and did fine.

    Not to offend anyone, but the majority of the course seemed like a show and tell with the different presenter's guns. In my experience we learned very little hunting safety. -Rich
     
  16. Marco Polo

    Marco Polo TS Member

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    MOST Adults can pass the test when they walk in the door. BUT, most also tell us that they learned something new at the class.
     
  17. atashooter

    atashooter Member

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    Let's reward Illinois by going and spending some more of our money there. Never see me do it.
     
  18. magnumthunder

    magnumthunder Member

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    YEP!! Soon you will be like New York and Kaliforna!! Look You have to have a FOID card just to buy ammo! What next No Carry Permits? Oppps!! Guess that's the case too! Sucks to be you!! I had nothing to do with who got elected in your state!
     
  19. Dr Joe

    Dr Joe Member

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    It would appear as if some people think age is the deciding factor for gun safety. My son has shot trap and hunted with me since age 8. During that first year he harvested 2 whitetails and numerous ducks and geese. He is now 12 and we justed finished a fantastic youth duck hunting weekend. To say that all children are not capable is a gross injustice. To keep fathers or mothers from experiencing the joy of hunting or shooting with there child is simply wrong. Kids have so many other things to divert them from the shooting sports that to give them on less reason to shoot sounds ludicrus. There are other ways to keep kids who are not capable out of the sport by maybe actually making the classes for hunting more demanding. I understand that not all children are not capable of safe firearm handling but why restrict those that are? What is next? Maybe we should decide how old, weak or senile someone can be at an older age and then stop them from being able to shoot. Or maybe more importantly lets decide how goofey a politician can get before he or she needs to give up office?
     
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