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Wood weight ?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by 635 G, Apr 10, 2011.

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  1. 635 G

    635 G Well-Known Member

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    How much weight difference could there be in a gun stock made of the lightest wood commonly used to a really dense wood. Lets say walnut vs. pin oak vs maple.

    Phil Berkowitz
     
  2. RunGunIPSC

    RunGunIPSC TS Member

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    I would be interested in this also. The real difficulty with lighter wood is the fact that there are more open pores resulting in difficulty in checkering finer patterns,in holding fit to complex receiver inletting & in wood removal.
    Finishes soak in & need more sealing. Prone to dents faster. Maybe some of the custom stockers can comment? Tom Lobonc
     
  3. 635 G

    635 G Well-Known Member

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    I've got 2 guns-almost identical--one stock is a pin oak, the other is a claro walnut. The oak gun feels significantly heavier.

    Phil Berkowitz
     
  4. sixten38

    sixten38 Member

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    Phil.
    Here is a link to wood densities, not exact but will give you an idea, bigger number is heavier
     
  5. 635 G

    635 G Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, it appears that the Pin Oak can be 50% heavier than a Claro Walnut. Looks like scale time.

    Phil Berkowitz
     
  6. 1brucem

    1brucem TS Member

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    I opened the link and looked at Myrtle wood. I have been interested in it as a stock wood and bought a few different pieces in hopes of making some new stocks. It has been pointed out that Myrtle wood can be as light as walnut and as heavy as box wood. The different pieces I've gotten have supported that. The honey Myrtle feels like walnut in weight and the black seems twice as heavy. The link posts but one weight for Myrtle wood. I guess this is a long winded way of saying there is so much variation in types of wood that the best way to determine the relative weighs of two different pieces is... weigh them. Bruce
     
  7. Mr.M

    Mr.M Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

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    I can comment on Myrtlewood, and I will. My experience in Myrtlewood is that the darker the wood, the heavier the wood. This is a general experience from the handling of over 1000 Myrtlewood blanks in both shotgun and rifle configurations. That said, I have some very light background Myrtlewood that is hugely dense and heavy, but that is the exception. A lot of the answer has to do with where and in what conditions the tree grew. Soil makeup, mineral content, sunlight/shade, consistency of water availability and other environmental factors play a huge role in the rate of growth on an annual basis and, therefore, the density/weight of two pieces of the same size from different trees, groves, regions, etc.

    By the same token, Walnuts, Maple, Oak, etc. have general rules and ratios relative to weight, but do differ widely among their species depending on the factors surrounding their growth mentioned above.

    Mike Mann
     
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