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Wood vs. Mechanical

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by FNG, Mar 16, 2010.

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  1. FNG

    FNG Member

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    Do you feel that a quality, properly fitted custom wood stock provides as much reduction in felt recoil as one of the many mechanical devices ? Also, when having a custom stock made, would it be advisable , from a cost/quality standpoint, to shop for and purchase your own wood and provide it to the stock maker, or just purchase from the maker ? Thanks for your opinions.
     
  2. Neil Winston

    Neil Winston Well-Known Member

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    Question One - sometimes. A stock that fits, paired with reasonable loads, doesn't kick much at all.

    Question Two - Occurs to me now and then, but then I ask myself "What do you know about wood?" Your decision may depend on how you answer that question.

    Neil
     
  3. Steve W

    Steve W Well-Known Member

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    Unless you have certain out of ordinary dimensions, an adj. comb and pad will accommodate 99% of your needs. In many cases, a "properly" fitted stock is the definition from your stock fitter, not you.

    If you shoot a lot, no matter how well your stock fits, the recoil will get you sooner or later. Almost everyone I know that shoots more than a case of shells per week use some kind of recoil devises.
     
  4. Mike Michalski

    Mike Michalski Member

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    If you provide the wood, the stockmaker will not stand behind the finished stock if, indeed, the stock gets finished. If he runs into a hidden defect it's your problem. On his own wood he starts over on his dime.
     
  5. Shell Shucker

    Shell Shucker TS Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2009
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    FNG

    I prefer a straight line recoil stock set up combined with a hydrualic
    buffer assembly, but I'm just funny that way. No cheek slap, with very
    little recoil. Shoot all day and no pain.

    Of course if wood is your favorite you can go with a custom Space Gun,
    but pretty expensive for most.

    Al Ljutic had it right!

    Happy Blastin'

    JJ Clarke



    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  6. jimrich60

    jimrich60 Member

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    810
    A custom stock, if done by a qualified stock maker/fitter such as Wenigs, or some of the other highly experienced stock makers, can certainly improve your shooting. A truly qualified stock maker/fitter takes a lot of time and effort in insuring that your stock is fitted such that when you, with your personal and unique physique, style, way of shouldering, etc bring the gun up, it points exactly where you want it to, and lends itself to the proper sight picture, swing, etc. It is not a substitute for concentration, technique, and the like, but an adjunct to those to help you shoot to best of your ability. As someone said, some of this "fitting" can be achieved through an adjustable stock, but even this can only be fully acheived if a knowledgeable fitter is working with you to acheive the proper adjustments. But will either actually reduce recoil? No, they cannot do that. A properly fitted stock will almost always feel better and may well ease the "felt" recoil or perception of recoil however. What you have to ask yourself is what is this worth to you? A custom stock can, and probably will, run several thousand dollars. If you are a top competitor looking for that one additional broken target in a tournament that will win, then quite possibly. If you are simply an everyday shooter, then only you can answer if you can and/or want to invest that kind of money. If it is simply a matter of recoil, then a better solution to that is simply to use lighter sensible loads. A mechanical recoil device may help a little, but again may have some cost in terms of weight and gun handling characteristics. Only you can determine if the trade off makes things better or worse.

    Jim R
     
  7. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Furry Lives Matter TS Supporters

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    JJ,

    Where'd you get those mechanicals?

    Joe
     
  8. R.Kipling

    R.Kipling Well-Known Member

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    they look like Mesa's to me.......

    Kip
     
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