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Wood repair impact to high end guns’ resale value.

Discussion in 'For Sale- Members only' started by rcclee, Feb 10, 2012.

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  1. rcclee

    rcclee Member

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    Hi Guys,

    Since I am new to this sport, based on your experience, if a high grade gun (such as K-80 Gold Target or Perazzi Gold Extra, or Kolar Gold custom, or SO9EELL etc...) has a repaired stock, how much will this stock repair (assume the repair work is done by the gun manufacturer)impact the resale value of the gun?

    I was told that since all high grade gun comes with highly figured wood, it is VERY normal to see wood repair in those guns. Is that true?

    If I am about the buy a used gun for $23K and found that the stock was repaired around the trigger guard area, how much “discount” do you think it’s reasonable to ask for solely because of the stock was repaired? Let’s assume the reset of the gun is fine.

    Your insights and feedbacks are greatly appreciated.

    Thanks,
     
  2. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald Active Member

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    I will ask for others who will need or want to know to answer your question: How visable is the repair and what kind of repair is it?

    Rollin
     
  3. vpr80

    vpr80 Active Member

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    I don't know about you, but at $23K it implies a very high end gun with a very expensive stock. I would be very weary of the damage, the quality of the repair and who fixed it. Having said that, you need to approximate the cost of a new stock and I would discount something in between asking price and asking less the cost of a new stock.
     
  4. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    Depends on the grade of wood, the extent of the damage, the cost to replace the stock, the overall value of the gun, ect. As far as a percentage off the gun, there's no way to tell, too many variables. I would think of it more as a percentage off the value of the wood, which I would put at anywhere b/w 25% and 75% (off the value of the wood alone), depending on the nature of the damage. In other words, figure out how much it would cost to replace the wood, then calculate 25% to 75% of that cost, and subtract that from the total price of the gun.

    I definitely wouldn't call it VERY normal. High grade wood is more susceptible to damage due to the nature of the grain, but there are many ways the stockmaker can mitigate the risk of damage, and it certainly isn't normal for it to break, its all a matter of how well it was fit to the wood, how the stockmaker cut it, did the end user take proper care of it, ect. PLENTY of high grade stock sets out there that are still as solid as the day they were made, and they are DEFINITELY the vast majority.
     
  5. OLD ONE EYE

    OLD ONE EYE Well-Known Member

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    I am no expert for sure but I have seen a lot of older Perazzi guns with slight cracks in the trigger area both on top and bottom where the rear of e receiver metal meets with the wood. several shooters have this area relieved and glassed when the gun is new or soon after as the receiver does set back after some fireing. I have 2 Perazzi MX guns with this issue after relieving and glass installed it has stayed the same for years now . I wish I knew about this when they were new.
     
  6. Avaldes

    Avaldes Well-Known Member

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    I would bound the problem by saying you can probably find a one of a kind, high end Turkish blank for around $3k. Figure another $3k or so for a custom stock.

    You could certainly pay more for both the wood and the stockmaker, depending on if they are in the US or abroad.

    But a custom stock is a very personal thing. It may fit you but not the next person. So the actual value of the stock is difficult to nail down. There is also some pride of ownership, depending on who made the stock.
     
  7. Rebel Sympathy

    Rebel Sympathy Well-Known Member

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    I tend to agree with the camp that proposes high-end fancy wood is more apt to crack, etc. I've seen a virtually new Super Crown Krieghoff with a repaired crack. The crack ran from the bottom tang outward. It was repaired by the original stockmaker in 1973 and has not been a problem since.

    Paul at J-S Recoil told me that most cracks from the tang areas will reach a certain length and then stop growing, never becoming a real structural problem. He would know more than I....

    Fortunate, indeed, is he who never suffers a crack in his high-grade wood - or in anything else, for that matter. HAW-HAW!

    Mike
     
  8. high 2

    high 2 Member

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    Being this my business I have had quite a bit of experience in stock repair. All stocks need regular maintenance, especially guns that are subjected to high recoil loads. I make a good amount of money fixing them each year. I see more and more stocks made from blanks that are beautiful, but should never have been used for more than a forearm. It's a big factor in who repaired the stock to begin with. You usually get one good shot at fixing it right.
    How much it reduces the retail price is hard to say. 23K for a gun is a bunch, especially if you have to restock it after you buy it. Larry
     
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