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Why shoot a 12 gauge?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Hipshot 3, Oct 19, 2007.

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  1. Hipshot 3

    Hipshot 3 TS Member

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    Irfner.....That a very good question!
     
  2. wannaz

    wannaz Member

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    Cause my 20ga citori kicks like a mule even with the 7/8 oz. loads lol
     
  3. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    PerazziBigBore- Do you know of any data that demonstrates the relationship between the length of the shot column in a shell to the length of shot string at 40 yards?

    Pat Ireland
     
  4. jakearoo

    jakearoo Active Member

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    Pat,
    I don't know the details of this but when the bunker shooters went to the 24 gram load some shooters decided to use 20 ga. guns. Apparently, that did not last long. For some reason the 12s pattern better and flatter.

    And Pat, you really should get a flat of international loads and shoot em. I promise your eyes will be opened. Jake
     
  5. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    What Steve said. If it weren't for 4 gauge skeet, I would not fool with anything but a 12 for target. A light weight 20 O/U for dove, quail, squirrel and rabbit. I live in Dixie.
     
  6. AJKohler

    AJKohler Member

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    Personally, I shoot 7/8 oz. in 12 gauge because I can't get a good pattern - or a satisfactory wad - in 20 ga. I love my skeet/clays gun with the 28 ga. tubes in it - in 20, it's got a serious case of CHS - but 28 ga. hulls are SOOOO expensive and I don't have barrels of them the way I do in 12. I've got a load in 12 that I'm delighted with. I'm not unwilling to change - I've shot several rounds with 28 and done as well as I do with 12 - but my 12 gauge setup works just fine, thank you. It ain't broke, as they say.

    Tony
     
  7. Gargoyle!

    Gargoyle! TS Member

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    Because they will not let me use my 10 ga.
     
  8. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    I can understand a more open pattern due to a greater percentage of the shot scrubbing against the harder barrel in a shell with a long shot column. I suppose the increased deformation of the shot might result in a longer shot string for small gages but all of these possibilities are simply theories in my mind. Frequently, when such theories are tested, they are proven inaccurate. More open pattern is easy to test. Increased shot string, now all I could conclude is that it is possible.

    PerazziBigBore- Yes, published conclusions are, and should be questioned, if they are not supported with sound data. Several years ago a quite prolific writer in Trap and Field simply made up ideas and tried to support them with fictitious data. His name does appear from time to time on this site.

    Pat Ireland



    Pat Ireland
     
  9. Easystreet

    Easystreet Well-Known Member

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    Pat,

    The more open patterns which accompany loads with long shot columns is not due to the shot scraping on the side of the barrel. The plastic shot cup essentially eliminates that as a concern.

    Instead, the longer shot columns suffer a greater percentage of shot deformed due to "setback" forces as the shot accelerates from a dead stop to around 1200 fps in a few thousandths of a second. The longer shot column has more shot stacked on top of it than a short shot column. Therefore, the shot near the bottom of the long column has more weight above it and has less surface area to spread the acceleration force. Therefore, the shot near the bottom of the long column is "squeezed" more and deformed more during acceleration down the barrel. All else being equal, round shot will fly straighter than deformed shot. That's why shooters who want the tightest patterns at long yardages will choose hard shot rather than soft shot, because hard shot deforms less.

    Easystreet
     
  10. 8 1/2 shot

    8 1/2 shot TS Member

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    PBB I would expect that you are about on with your findings. The neatest, tho smaller, patterns I have ever seen are from 12 gauge with 3/4 and 7/8 of hard shot. My results from shooting 1 1/8 loads is akin to shooting a modified choke. Just a bigger pattern, at least on my paper. Precision for me comes with reduced shot charges, as in less than 1 oz. I have never tried a super tight choke, just an .035, I seriously doubt if the larger charges would tighten up all that much with one. Now some days precision may not be so desired as in when its windy as heck, which is most of the time when I get to shoot. I generally load 8's in 1 1/8, 8 1/2 in 7/8 and hard 9 in 3/4, pattern density is superb with the smaller charges, pattern size is bigger with larger. I drive my smaller loads lots faster, I suspect choke and shot ramming into each other affects the pattern the most. The ramming effect sure affects balls on my pool table, why not in the barrel. All this experimentation represents the fun and interesting side of trapshooting for me.
     
  11. Easystreet

    Easystreet Well-Known Member

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    Irfner,

    I would say that it does make the case for backboring..... although only SLIGHTLY. There is not nearly as much difference between a standard bore 12 gauge and a backbored 12 gauge as there is between a 12 gauge and a 20 gauge.

    Easystreet
     
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