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Why do you reload shells?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by senior smoke, Oct 6, 2012.

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  1. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    Hello:
    Let me start off by saying that the real reason I use to reload was to save money on a box of shotgun shells. I have never had a great reload that even came close to a premium factory shell, nor did I ever really like to reload as I always felt it was to time comsuming.

    Years ago, the rule of thumb was that you could reload a box of shells for half the cost of new shells. With the high cost of componets today along with the Walmarts of the world offering 4 paks of Federal and Winchester shells, it just doesn't make any sense to me to continue reloading.

    If you feel that you have stumbled apon a fantastic reload, or you just have the time to reload, that's one thing. But with the large amount of reloading componets that you would need to purchase in today's economy to reload for less than the farm and barn shells being offered today, it does not make any sense to me to continue reloading.

    The other day, I even gave away my reloader along with a scale, shot, powder, and primers that I still had.

    So please tell me, why do you continue to still reload shells?
    Steve Balistreri
     
  2. broadwaybill

    broadwaybill Member

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    Because I can smokey.

    Fifteen two and a pair is four.

    Bill
     
  3. GW22

    GW22 Active Member

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    It's pretty simple. The idea is to make $9/box shells for a bit less than the price of $5/box shells. Plus many think it's fun and a cool hobby to load ammo and experiment with various loads.

    I, on the other hand, started doing it again because its fun to hear my wife ask if there's ANY CHANCE AT ALL that the entire house might explode.

    -Gary
     
  4. fssberson

    fssberson Active Member

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    1. Pleasure. 2. Control over the quality and purpose of the shell. Promotional loads use poor lead. 3. Cost -- reloads are still cheaper [not by much]. 4. Family time. I used to give my daughter the job of examining casings, putting them in the 50 shell holders, and placing the wad in the machine while loading. This was a sneaky way of teaching her the components and the science part of reloading. Fred
     
  5. Masterplan

    Masterplan TS Member

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    GW22 is correct. the advantage is the premium loads when reloading.

    if you want run of the mill 1145's buy em cheaper and save the hulls to sell or reload..............

    I like the softness of green dot even at 1200pfs+

    Also hodgdens Universal is nicer on the shoulder

    this is not for the spare time shooter
     
  6. 4th. down

    4th. down Active Member

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    I can still reload for $5/box/net, 1 1/8 oz. loads that are comparable to AA's for $9/box including tax.

    I did a test several weeks ago with a reload, vs. AA SHCP, and Rem. Nitro 27. There was about a 10 pellet difference on avg., not enough difference for me to pay $9/box/net.
     
  7. slayer

    slayer Well-Known Member

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    Since starting it about 3 years ago, it has become a very enjoyable excercise for me. Plus, I missed getting 100 straight at a local shoot because I was using the cheapie 4 pack shells. One of them didn't fire, and I didn't have a spare [factory loads always fire, right?]. Borrowed one from a friend on the line and missed. I have never had a misfire in thousands of rounds with my shells, which I load with the best components available. And I crush 'em...Bill
     
  8. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    I don't believe that I'd get into reloading "today" with the higher start-up costs of buying tools, scale, bench, etc... but since I've already paid myself back over the past dozen or more years... I still save a few bucks a box... which essentially pays for my targets...

    As many have said, I can tailor my loads for my kind of shooting... and that's priceless!

    Best regards all,

    Jay
     
  9. clayshtr

    clayshtr Member

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    Location:
    illinois
    It gives me something to do on those nasty winter days. At least until I head south.
     
  10. oz

    oz Active Member

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    you can reload a shell/cartrige that you can't buy.
     
  11. N2deep

    N2deep Member

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    1. I enjoy reloading, if you buy a quality progressive reloader and set up the bench properly it requires little time
    2. It provides the opportunity to tailor fit my loads to my gun and purpose
    3. You control the quality of the shells, I think my shells are second to none and would match them with any factory shell

    My favorite skeet reload costs $4.63 a box, (AA-18.1 Clays-DRA12-W209-1Oz at 1200FPS)

    Regards Art
     
  12. shoobedoo

    shoobedoo Member

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    I can understand both points of view here, I once reloaded shotshells but not anymore. I think one factor people tend to overlook when calculating the per box cost of reloaded shells versus factory loads is the number of boxes you'll need to reload just to recoup the initial cost of your equipment and components. Now this scenario would apply mainly to someone who wants to start reloading and doesn't have a machine or supplies yet, ie. someone starting from scratch. Let's say it is going to cost our new reloader a total of $1000 to purchase a reloading machine, plus a bulk supply of hulls, primers, wads, shot, and powder etc. to get started. Now, let's say for the sake of argument our reloader can save .50 cents a box producing his own shells versus buying factory loads, the math here is pretty simple, our new reloader will have to make 2000 boxes of shells just to break even on his equipment & supplies, that's a lot of shells, to put it in perspective that's 200 flats!! Just something to consider for someone who is thinking about getting in to shotshell reloading purely from a position of cost savings.
     
  13. Chichay

    Chichay TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Hobby. Started in 1966 with shotshells, then rifle and pistol calibers. Quickly learned I can tweak my reloads to get the utmost potential out of the firearms I'm using.
     
  14. 1oldtimer

    1oldtimer TS Member

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    Starting reloading in 1957. Our cost at that time was $1.00 a box. I shoot a lot of 1- 1/4 ounce loads for the games. Factory 1- 1/4 ounce loads can cost $15.00 +. I can reload them and save at least 50% with equal or superior quality. I get a sense of accomplishment breaking that target at 75 yards with a roll your own.
    Clyde
     
  15. Rufus80

    Rufus80 TS Member

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    I reload more for skeet than trap. Because they don't make promo loads for 28 and 410.
     
  16. Scott Johnson

    Scott Johnson Well-Known Member

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    Start up costs on reloading is cheaper than you think, there is always someone out there that is selling a used reloader for half price or less. There is not always a need to buy brand new. Scott
     
  17. MDMike

    MDMike Well-Known Member

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    If I were going to get into it today from scratch, I don't think so. I got into reloding years ago. A while back I purchased a pallet of shot for less that $10.00 a bag. Then I bought a pile of wads and primers. Then a friend called me and told me about a sporting goods store that was going out of business in his area. I drove down to the store and low and behold, he had several cases of wads and a load of 7 1/2 and 8 Magnum shot. I bought everything he had left. For a while I got out of shotgun shooting and later picked up on sportings clays. I didn't shoot too many shells per weekend with sporting maybe 50-100. About 4 years ago I got back into trap and now burn a lot more shells. My big stash is coming in handy and will probably last me for many years. When I run out of shot I don't know what I'll do. But for now I'll keep building premimum shells at non premimum cost. And besides, I like doing it. Every now and then I'll find shot for less that $40.00 per bag and I'll still purchase a couple. I'm a horder.....
     
  18. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

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    Because it's my favorite hobby. I only shoot trap to get more empty hulls to reload.
     
  19. The Stive

    The Stive Member

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    I reload and I enjoy it. When comparing the cost vs premium shells, I can save
    money. When comparing against the cheaper shells the savings are small. I will
    continue to reload because I enjoy it. John
     
  20. john g.

    john g. TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    I started reloading around 1973. I enjoyed it and it saved me money building a quality load. It is fun to build up a good game load. I stopped in the mid 90s and bought $32.00 a flat Reos for years. I did inventory this summer and found I had lots of supplies and started again, having fun.

    I also like to play {clean, lube and adjust} older equipment now that I am retired.Some of these older progressive presses are fun to use even if you have to resize the shell first.

    John G.
     
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