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Why Different Odors?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Chango2, Jan 31, 2011.

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  1. Chango2

    Chango2 Active Member

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    Why do some shells, after firing, smell like rotten eggs, while others are merely smokey smelling. Others smell more like generic, typical firecrackers and fireworks. Why is that? So one can identify what he or she has shot? Is this tradition? Is this done intentially by inorganic chemists? I've often wondered. Thanks, perhaps a chemist out there can explain.
     
  2. ricks1

    ricks1 TS Member

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    I wondered the same thing about women. still dont know
     
  3. Chango2

    Chango2 Active Member

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    ricks 1: That takes an organic chemist to figure that one out. One clue: Look up the jasmine plant.
     
  4. ms_yuan

    ms_yuan Member

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    It is the chemistry of the powder. Powder recipes vary and can be tweaked to optimize burn rate, how much residue is left, pressures, "efficiency", profit, etc. With some compounds, it doesn't take much to notice them. Some of the sulphur-containing compounds are detectable by nose in the sub-part-per billion range. A little goes a long way.

    And yes, I was a chemist, but not a powder chemist. A long, long time ago.
     
  5. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    All I know is I love the scent of Federal Papers.
     
  6. DelarockX

    DelarockX TS Member

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    Gun Clubs don't really have a distinct smell. I swear that Fed Top Gun shells smell like a Burger King parking lot.
     
  7. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    7625, the best smell.
     
  8. Bernie K

    Bernie K Member

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    Every shell I missed a target with I thought stunk, or is that stank.
     
  9. glenns

    glenns Member

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    I like the small of Estate hulls.
     
  10. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Gotta agree with Tim on Federal papers ... the best smell. Actually a lot of the old papers shells smell like that so it must have something to do with nitro burning paper/cardboard. Dang hull huffers!
     
  11. DelarockX

    DelarockX TS Member

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    I think I might have been thinking about Estate shells.

    There is a shell that smells like a BBQ and I love it.
     
  12. grnberetcj

    grnberetcj Active Member

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    Personally I like napalm the best.....but each to their own!

    Curt
     
  13. W.R.Buchanan

    W.R.Buchanan Member

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    I have a friend who will only shoot fed papers because he loves the smell. He literally has moving boxes full of them I bet he has 50,000 hulls laying around. I have shot a bunch of them and I have to agree they smell more like burnt firecrackers than any other type of shell.

    I load my AA's with the same 19.5 gr of GreenDot my friend uses and they kind of smell right but not as good as the Feds.

    I have some powders that smell awful,, Trail Boss is the worst. Definately alot of sulfur in that one.

    I also like Bullseye. Anything that is 40% nitro can't be all bad!

    Randy
     
  14. 22hornet

    22hornet Well-Known Member

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    Federal papers and the old Blue Peter's. Please, no blue peter jokes.
     
  15. CalvinMD

    CalvinMD Well-Known Member

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    Smells will vary depending on where you stick your nose
     
  16. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    Maybe it is not gun powder you smell.
     
  17. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    Clays always smells like ammonia.
     
  18. idoc

    idoc Member

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    Vision is categorized into three major types: Photopic, which is daylight vision, Scotopic, what we use at night, and Mesopic, which is the transition between the two. The human eye contains two types of photo-receptors, known as rods and cones. These receptors change light into impulses that are interpreted by the brain, and this is how we see. Photopic vision utilizes cones only. Cones are the receptors in the back of the eye used for color perception. Scotopic vision uses just the rods, which are black and white receptors. Mesopic vision uses a combination of both rods and cones.

    Cones are concentrated at one spot in the back of the eye in a specific area called the fovea. (The fovea is a small area inside the better-known macula.) Rods are concentrated over a much larger area off the center of the retina. In fact, night vision, using the rods, is enhanced if we look 15 degrees to the right or left of where we want to see. That angle from the macula is where the greatest concentration of rods is located. During WW II, in the South Sea Islands, Marines were taught to look at an angle into the tree limbs looking for snipers. They were looking for different shades of contrast that a body sitting on a limb would create. This difference in lighter or darker shading would be a rod function. If we were looking at an object during the day and wanted to see it the best we could, then we would want to look directly at it because then the focus of the light would be exactly on the macula and that is where the greatest acuity and the greatest concentration of cones is.

    Pursuit and saccadic eye movements are the two movements we use in shotgun sports. An example of the relatively slow pursuit movement is the simple act of following a target. An example of the much faster saccadic movement is changing from one target to another in doubles. It is well established that both saccadic and pursuit movements are enhanced by using the macula, where the cones are concentrated.

    Depth perception is also a function that is significantly enhanced by macula stimulation. In fact, we loose all depth perception in scotopic conditions. If you have ever tried to dock a boat at night or tell how far away a light was, you know that it is difficult to estimate the distance. One hundred feet can look the same as ten feet.

    In order to visually enhance our ability to break clay targets we want to maximize macular function. To do this we need to stimulate as many cones as possible. Obviously, the way to do this is to get as much light into our eyes as we possibly can.

    Bottom line is the CMT lens pushes us toward rod function and should only be used in extremely bright environments. Hope this helps.............Rich Colo
     
  19. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    Wrong thread?
     
  20. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    I tell you what stinks, those Wally World Federals. YUCK!
     
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