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Why did Krieghoff replace the K32 with the K80?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Bucko43, Jan 8, 2012.

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  1. Bucko43

    Bucko43 Well-Known Member

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    Does anyone know why the model 32 was replaced with the K80? I'm thinking about buying a model 32 and would like to know a little more before I do it.

    Thanks,

    Kevin
     
  2. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    What I heard was that it was a work-around to dupont's exclusive import rights on the Model 32.
     
  3. fly

    fly Active Member

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    Wasn't the K80 merely an upgrade of the 32? After all, most parts interchange. Isn't this a Camaro and a Z28?
     
  4. over the hill

    over the hill Active Member

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    From what I have heard over the years Skeet Man is correct.



    Regards....Gerald
     
  5. EuroJoe

    EuroJoe TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    DuPont had the exclusive rights on the "Krieghoff" name. So when Deiter wanted to market their guns in USA, they could not be called Krieghoffs, hence,"Shotguns of Ulm" and the K-80, which was an upgrade.
     
  6. JLSO5

    JLSO5 Member

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    Skeet man is right and Krieghoff was not happy with more so called crowns and super crowns being engraved over here than at the factory. Thus the case hardened K-80 which are 99% engraved by the factory.
     
  7. B.C.

    B.C. Member

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    It was called a Trap 80 first, then a K80 later .
     
  8. fly

    fly Active Member

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    interesting.
     
  9. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    To make money. HMB
     
  10. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    So the Shotguns of Ulm name was dropped when Dupont's import rights for "Krieghoff" expired?
     
  11. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    This from the December 2008 issue of Sporting Clays magazine. This synopsis of an article was submitted to Trapshooters.com on October 30, 2008 for interested parties.


    The Rem. 32, of course, was the beginning of the saga, released in 1932 (clever name eh?) and was particularly unique in the the sliding top lock. After World War II ended, the Russians took control of E. Germany and Heinrich Krieghoff chose to escape to the West and settled in Ulm near the Austrian border. It was there that he set up a small factory to make sporting arms.

    Around the mid-50s Heinrich was approached by Bascom Lotspeich, a live pigeon shooter, who encouraged Heinrich to manufacture the Rem. model 32 which had been suspended before WWII. The author says, "Hal duPont told me that Remington had not renewed the patents on it's model 32 but eventually duPont had Remington write a letter saying it was OK for Krieghoff to make the Krieghoff model 32."

    When Krieghoff began manufacturing the M.32 exactly the same as the Remington, another live pigeon shooter, Donnie Donaldson, convinced Krieghoff and Lotspeich to design a new trigger for the gun. They spent some $15,000 to have a new design made and the manufacturer of that design was Miller Triggers in Pennsylvania. Miller triggers were famous at that time.

    It is belived the first Krieghoff M.32 was produced in 1955 and continued production was very limited. "The first 400 Krieghoff 32s produced had the Remington trigger, but they were retrofitted with the new Miller-designed trigger at no cost." The author says around 1960 duPont got his MBA from college and began shooting clays around the country and he, "...even made a contract to sell all the Krieghoffs that came into the [U.S.], and he maintained that contract until the K-80 was introduced in 1980." The author continues, "Even then, [duPont] held the contract to sell all the Krieghoffs that came into the country, but he evidently relented in return for his Krieghoff distributorship all over the southern U.S."

    Dieter Krieghoff moved to the U.S. in 1980 to start up what now is known as Krieghoff International. His father had taken over the business in 1970. The author states, "The Krieghoff model 32 was never a monumental seller nor was it intended to be. The idea was to make a precision over-under that could ... stand the tough test of time, ...to withstand the tortures of 10s of thousands of rounds. These days there are hundreds of model 32 Krieghoffs and K-80s that have been shot well over 100,000 times."

    The author goes on to describe the sliding top lock being the most obvious similarity between the Rem. and K. guns and that both 32s and K-80s continue to sport mechanical triggers. He explains that Krieghoff doesn't introduce new guns regularly that have improvements, the improvements are simply added to the guns currently made. He points out the K-80 now has been on the market longer than the M.32 before the introduction of the K-80. He discusses the main difference in the two models is the fact that the K-80 was introduced and continues to sport receivers made of hardened metal.

    There is further discussion of when skeet, 4 barrel sets, and so on were introduced and more on engraving but I've used enough space here to cover the beginnings of Krieghoff shotguns we admire.....breakemall....Bob Dodd


    For a precise comparison betwen the Model 32 and the K 80, see this web page:
    http://www.halkguns.com/newsletter/k80vsK32.htm
     
  12. Bucko43

    Bucko43 Well-Known Member

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    Wow! Thanks for all the info guys! It sounds like the model 32 will be a good investment. Appreciate the input.

    Kevin
     
  13. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    The 32s, indeed, are a good choice for some degree of "investing." I'm told, but have no personal knowledge, that many owners prefer the older, M.32 barrels when customizing K-80s.......breakemall
     
  14. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

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    If you like the K80s and K32s but can't afford one ... take a good look at the Rem 3200s!

    They are kissing cousins!
     
  15. Rebel Sympathy

    Rebel Sympathy Well-Known Member

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    They are so much alike that the serial number sequence/range between the 32 and the 80 was not even changed. It was more of a "progression of progress" than a model change. The model designation change from 32 to 80 was more of a marketing ploy than anything else...... There was a change in the 32 (M-32) at 400; another at 3000; another at 5000; and another at 11800 - or whenever the K-80 designation came into use. Likewise, the K-80 has had several "milestone" changes since introduction. In fact, I've heard several guys say they only want a K-80 if the serial number is above 25,000. So be it. One could rightly say there is a bigger difference between an early K-80 and a currently new K-80 than there is between the last 32 and the first K-80.

    It is kind of like the single-action Colt six-gun. To collectors, there is a BIG difference between the 1st generation and the 2nd generation. (not to mention the 3rd generation.) But in reality, there is more difference between an early 1st gen and a late 1st gen than there is between a late 1st and an ealry 2nd generation. And the serial number ranges were, indeed, changed in this Colt example.

    Mike
     
  16. fly

    fly Active Member

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    I shoot a K80 for sporting and also K32 with K80 upgrades including wood and trigger. When shooting, it's hard to tell which is which, other than the K32 was 10 grand less!!! (lesson learned)
     
  17. EuroJoe

    EuroJoe TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    AHAB: you are totally wrong about the relationship of 32s to 3200. Remington made the 3200 to resemble the 32 cosmetically,i.e. split bbls and sliding top latch. Beyond looks, the 3200 is a club by comparison.
     
  18. mrskeet410

    mrskeet410 TS Member

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    K-32s had problems with their receiver blueing.
     
  19. gdbabin

    gdbabin TS Member

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    A club???? ouch!


    Guy Babin
     
  20. JLSO5

    JLSO5 Member

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    The blueing on the 32's receiver and barrels have the same problems as the K-80 barrels now. If you handle them with bare hands the blueing is going away. Some people have more acid in their sweat than others but it will wear off.
    Over the last 40 years I have had 3 32 receivers and at least 7 barrels re-blued. The coin was not as bad but I had 2 of them redone.
    I agree with the above post in that the only thing that a 32 and a 3200 have in common is the first 2 numbers.
     
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