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Why 1898?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Big Al 29, Jun 27, 2013.

  1. Big Al 29

    Big Al 29 TS Member

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    Why does the antique firearm end at the end of 1898 and an FFL needed for any firearm built in 1899?

    To make life easy why not 1900?

    I read the Boer War is the cut off but why and how did the Government decide on 1898? What is so specific about 1898 for the Government to use that year?
     
  2. timberfaller

    timberfaller Well-Known Member

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    Leave it up to government to take the simple and complicate it!!

    Here is the ATF's explanation.
     
  3. MTA Tom

    MTA Tom Active Member

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    As far as I can determine, the date was just an arbitrarily chosen 70 years prior to the enactment of the Gun Control Act of 1968.

    Please note that the definition of an antique firearm differs in the National Firearms Act and the Gun Control Act. The Gun Control Act defines an antique as any firearm manufactured prior to 1899, regardless of the ammunition it uses (§ 921(a)(16). Under the National Firearms Act, firearms that use currently available fixed cartridges are not antiques, regardless of age (§ 5845(g). The NFA definition only matters if you are dealing with NFA regulated firearms such as machine guns or short barrel firearms.
     
  4. Bruce Em

    Bruce Em Member

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    The general distinction, with some exceptions, is the demarcation between black powder cartridge guns and smokeless.

    regards
     
  5. Hammer1

    Hammer1 Active Member

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    .

    Could it be because the 98 Mauser is considered by many to be the defining point of modern firearms and the 98 Mauser has been made in the millions by so many different countries that serial numbers are not easily used to define 1900 for that model ?

    While there were definitely semiautomatics prior to 1898, Colt semiautos have a 1897 patent date marking.

    1898... 1897... about the right time.

    Can't think of anything exciting with regards to firearms that happened in 1900.

    .
     
  6. oz

    oz Active Member

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    I always understood it was 10 years???
     
  7. Bruce Em

    Bruce Em Member

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    Think about the 88 Mauser, the 93 Spanish, and all the military world was taken by storm. Forced the US to the magazine fed Krag Jorgensen, but I believe with with a magazine cut off so ammo was not "wasted" in volume fire. That stayed in the program for the Springfields as well. Civilian guns stayed on BP for a while