1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

Who makes a good chisel?

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Auctioneer, Feb 21, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Auctioneer

    Auctioneer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,965
    I have some lathe chisels but I don't know how good they are. The person who I bought the lathe from put them in with the sale. He tried to sharpen them with a grinding stone. I don't know if they are worth sharpening or just replacing them. If I do replace them who makes a good set? I don't need the top of the line but I also don't want the bottom either. Middle and up would be good.
     
  2. Unsingle

    Unsingle Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    379
    Auctioneer - wood lathe chisels are made to be sharpened on a grinder because they dull so quickly. If you have a full set that came with the lathe, I would learn how to sharpen them before I got a good set. You will probably mess up several times. After you have learned to sharpen the chisels, go to Woodcraft.org or any of the other good woodworking site and purchase a good set. A good chisel will cost anywhere from $50-$80 each. You can have a lot of fun with your present chisels before you have to buy a good set.
     
  3. GW22

    GW22 Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Messages:
    6,246
    Unsingle is right -- proper shaping and sharpness is key. If you decide to go new, Robert Sorby's are pretty darn good.

    -Gary
     
  4. Auctioneer

    Auctioneer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,965
    Let me give you all alittle more info. When I say he used a grinder he did. It was a dry grinder. He killed most of the bits by grinding more then he needed. I would have used a Delta wet stone or a oil stone to sharpen them.
     
  5. Tron

    Tron Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    6,668
    When you sharpen chisels or bits, it's important not to overheat the metal to the point where it turns blue! When sparpening, take your time and have cool water near by to continually dip the chisel or bit into to cool down.
     
  6. WYBOO WOOD

    WYBOO WOOD Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2009
    Messages:
    84
    Location:
    SOUTH CAROLINA
    AUCTIONEER: Please keep several things in mind. Lathe chisels must be contoured to specific shapes to create the desired shapes on your turned piece. Most likely the chisels you have will be satisfactory if properly shaped. A fine grit grinding wheel is a must as is a VERY LIGHT TOUCH when grinding. Plus, as Tron points out keep a containeer of cold water handy and dip the chisel frequently when grinding. You must prevent any color change in the chisel as this will weaken the steel and shorten it's edge holding ability. Finally, suggest you purchase a book on turning, as this will illustrate grinding, mounting work in the lathe safely and answer any other questions you will have. Turning is a lot of fun if done safely. Dave Hunt
     
  7. PerazziBigBore

    PerazziBigBore TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,859
    My master craftsman/cabinetmaker gave me a set of chisels to harden in Casenite.. Once the profile was cut.. and the metal hardened.. he only used fine stones to impart a razor sharp edge.. Knowing HOW to sharpen a tool is key.. It's an art..If you're using a grinder.. you don't have a brush yet..
    In our shop..years ago.. the wood lathe was a daily used piece of equipment..I rehardened only a few chisels every year or two..

    On some of the gouges.. I hard faced the edge.. They lasted for about ever..

    A few special tools I used Starret tool steel..Especially the tiny chisels.. then oil hardened them... They too held a fantastic edge.. The secret to it all is to keep them sharp.. and never let them get dull to where they generated heat while being used.. Lots of relief..and razor sharp.. ALWAYS... John especially liked my ceramic stones I used for trigger jobs..and ground many to the exact profile for easy sharpening of the tool...

    Anyone using a single blade Delta shaper from the 40's will have a pile of sharpening stones..Enough stones and you can sharpen anything..
     
  8. Unsingle

    Unsingle Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    379
    Well Auctioneer, if you really want to get into this lathe thing, be prepared to spend the money. A good lathe will cost you what a fine trap gun costs, and then you start to really find out what you need to buy. Trust me, a lathe is only the start. Wow, it is fun though.

    Here is a site that has lots of information about sharpening chisels and lots of ways to spend money. Have fun. Their sharpening system really works, but it takes practice, like anything else.

    http://www.oneway.ca/sharpening/index.htm

    PS: Look at their lathes.
     
  9. Unsingle

    Unsingle Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    379
    Auctioneer, one other thing. New turners are advised to start out with a cheap set of lathe chisels. One set that is purchased a lot for practice is the set from Harbor Freight. They are cheap, they do work, and you can grind away until you learn how to sharpen them. You won't feel near as bad ruining a $8 chisel compared to a $80 chisel. If you really like turning, then buy a good set, plus you will know what you need.
     
  10. Bentley998

    Bentley998 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2010
    Messages:
    67
    Who makes good - chisels ?? - you can make some workable ones yourself - the metal in old files will make fine skews, domes, square ends - I have several dozen I use on a regular basis - buy a good grinder - I use a 8" Delta with coarse and fine wheels - others have remarked on not burning the steel- turn the handles and make ferrules from 1" copper tubing
    Gouges are more difficult and I would recommend buying a rather larger one for roughing out.

    After making and use several of your own - you can contemplate the $80 Sorbys - Woodcraft has a good range - Woodcraft is expensive but usually has good stuff - I have bought from them for many years

    Bill Myers
    757-651-1310
     
  11. Auctioneer

    Auctioneer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,965
    Thanks for all the info here. I have found some very nice wood lathes on the net. One was a Rockwell but it is a 3 phase. The one I wanted was the Powermatic 90. Again 3 phase. I do not have a converter box and I want to keep everything either 110 or 220. The Rockwell is up to $205.00 and the Powermatic is $525.00. Both are great prices but again 3 Ph. As for sharpening chisels. You will never see me take a chisel and grind it on a dry wheel. I know better then that. As I said in an earlier post I use a wet stone and or oil stone. The chisels that I have came with the little cheap lathe and the guy just didn't care or didn't know better when he put them on a grinder. I think the best thing for me to do is buy a new set and start from there and use the other chisels when I'm trying something new and don't want to take a chance on distroying the good ones.
     
  12. atashooter

    atashooter Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    625
    Try woodcraft
     
  13. blkcloud

    blkcloud Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2009
    Messages:
    1,308
    Auctioneer, do a little searching on google, you can make your own 3 phase converter for very little cost, all you need is a electric motor bigger than the one you are using, you turn it on first and then it will make the 3rd leg of the 3 phase, I have seen many "out in the country" shops run on these..
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.