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Which Recoils Less?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by WoodsonEnt, May 18, 2011.

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  1. WoodsonEnt

    WoodsonEnt Active Member

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    In your opinion, which kicks less......custom fitted stock with mercury recoil reducer/lead weight added or PFS?
     
  2. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    They should both reduce recoil about the same. I had a mercury reducer and I could feel the Mercury moving within the reducer. Suggest, save your money and just add weight.
    Steve Balistreri
     
  3. Trapmanjohn

    Trapmanjohn Member

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    Get a Semi Auto with a back bored barrel and an adjustable stock!!!
     
  4. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    If you could weight the PFS stock down with extra weight and make it fit the same as a fitted to you fixed stock, the PFS will give you less felt recoil. I know nothing about Vern's great stock except that it works well. Below is a picture of how I tame recoil with my combo gun. Besides the one on the outside, I also made one to replace the air/oil mechanism inside my stock and it's now all spring assisted and it works great at reducing felt recoil. My gun weighs 11 pounds and 5 ounces! Like shooting a BB gun with a lot of BBs all at once! I had to add the weight in order to continue shooting!Both of my weights are made with 7/8ths straight copper tubing filled with melted lead!


    hapmectweaks_2008_030317.jpg


    Hap
     
  5. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    How does a mercury recoil reducer work besides simply adding weight?
     
  6. Pull & Mark

    Pull & Mark Well-Known Member

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    Matt, The real question might be where would you find a custom made stock w/ recoil reducer in it for less than $l,000??? Can you change it if you gain/loss 50 pounds or so??? You can always sell the PFS down the road for what you have in it. Ever try to sell a custom piece of wood??? Break-em all. Jeff
     
  7. chipking

    chipking TS Member

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    The PFS because with it you have both a custom fitted stock and real recoil reduction. As a plus the PFS can stay custom fitted throughout your shooting life no matter how much your body changes.


    With the other set up even though you get the first part (a custom fitted stock)(until you gain or lose a bunch of weight) NO UNIT that sits entirely within a fixed length stock reduces recoil (except by the slight benefit of its added weight). What all these units do is change the feel of the recoil impulse by slipping, sliding or sloshing around during the recoil pulse.

    --- Chip King ---
     
  8. dverna

    dverna Active Member

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    I could not get enough cast off with a PFS but it does tame recoil. I need almost 3/4" of cast off. I would be using one if I could. They are ugly but I do not care.

    99% of shooters can be accommodated with a PFS.

    We have a PFS on my GF's BT-99 and she shoots it well. She weights about 125.

    Vern is a good person to deal with too.

    Don Verna
     
  9. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

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    JerryP

    "How does a mercury recoil reducer work besides simply adding weight?"

    Jerry I can't tell you that they all work the same or that they all even work. The one I have and have had for years works pretty good. It consist of a solid piece of stainless steel that has been bored out and they installed a baffle in side and then put mercury in it.

    The baffle appears to make the Mercury stay to the rear and when the shot is fired the Mercury runs into the front wall of the piece to stop the recoil. I can't tell you how it works as I am not recoil sensitive but it is heavy and it did put the 16 ounces where I wanted it.

    Bob Lawless
     
  10. WoodsonEnt

    WoodsonEnt Active Member

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    I was not asking a question for myself. I was asking other opinions. Today, I was talking to a guy that has gotten into shooting benchrest shooting competitions. I asked him if he ever flinched. He replied that with light triggers and heavy guns there was not enough recoil to ever flinch. I asked if he used a recoil reduction system. He told me with the weight of his gun, the whole gun was a recoil reduction system. Granted, he is not shooting 300 rounds a day, but that got me to thinking............

    According to the laws of physics or something (forgive me - wasn't my strongest subject in school) the heavier the object the less rearward motion (recoil) there would be. I know we don't need to be swinging 20lb. guns, but what about beefing that 8lb. P-gun to 9.5lb. Put a pound in the rear, and had some lead in the forearm area. I know the PFS is a wonderful tool, I have owned 4 of them personally. I am not knocking any recoil reducing product. Just stating while talking with this benchrest shooter got me to thinking about adding weight. Now, if we add weight and reduce loads to 1 ounce......oh no, that is another thread.
     
  11. Rastoff

    Rastoff Active Member

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    Adding weight is the only way to actually reduce the amount of recoil transferred to the shooter. As the shot is fired, the recoil must overcome the weight of the gun first, then it will start traveling backward. Adding weight is the simplest solution.

    Mechanical recoil devices, and soft rubber pads, don't actually reduce the recoil. What they do is spread the recoil out over time. By doing that the recoil is applied to the shooter over a longer period, and this feels less sharp. Thus, the feeling of recoil is reduced. The quantity of recoil is constant, the mechanical recoil device just transfers it differently.

    I would take the custom stock any day. While the PFS is a great device, it is very complicated. There are a ton of adjustments. If you don't know what you're doing, you will get frustrated. Also, the PFS is not adjustable for cast. Yes, the pad can be moved left or right, but that is not changing the angle of the barrel relative to the shoulders. Further, the custom stock involves a second set of eyes. If done correctly, you will have a professional fitting the stock to you. This will make it fit better than any adjustable stock fitted on your own.

    And yes, the weight gain or loss can be an issue. However, how many Trap shooters do you know that make drastic body shape changes? Not many.
     
  12. WoodsonEnt

    WoodsonEnt Active Member

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    Benchrest,

    No, I am not new to the sport. I have used almost every recoil reduction device on the market (almost). The wood stocks I have shot has always had 8oz. mercury reducer in it. They still kicked me. I am going to add 16oz. of weight and see what that does. I am not trying to model after the BR guy, it just got me to thinking. I am looking for a stock that shoots where I look, doesn't break down, and I can shoot 300 rounds a day without a headache.
     
  13. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    As well as my trap gun fits, and despite an 8 oz reducer, 100 rounds of Caps loads KICKS.

    I must be getting old. LOL
     
  14. yansica1

    yansica1 Member

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    All things being equal, 9 lbs gun, 1250 fps shells etc, etc, a PFS (or any other recoil reducer device for that matter) will have less felt recoil than a custom stock fitted by 20 gunsmiths with a 1000 years experience between them.
    Custom fit does not REDUCE felt recoil, it avoids what shouldn`t be there in the first place. Why else would people who shoot in a national team and who presumably have correctly fitted guns, suddenly decide to add a reducer too?
     
  15. 221

    221 Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    7/8 oz will solve most all of y'alls problems. Most of you are not winning with 1 1/8oz......be a man go to 7/8 and then you can get back to enjoying shooting again. Your shooting will improve. If you are fighting recoil, trying to trick it out of the gun is a waste if time.....lower the shot and learn how to shoot it. In the long run you will a better shooter.......shooting the loads that are the must while your sensitive is not good shooting practice. Quit playing.... follow the big dogs.
     
  16. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    I think a lot of people neglect/overlook the real benefit of a fitted shotgun stock. Reducing felt recoil is but a side benefit, the real plus is, it allows a lot more consistent shot placement time after time! A perfectly fitted to you stock that's very lightweight will still rattle your teeth with a light shotgun!!

    Where is it written in stone that a trapgun must weight this or that number for success? Harlen Campbell's K gun Special weighs nearly 13 pounds! Why doesn't he shoot the K gun as it comes off the assembly line at 9 pounds or so? Big Leo's B-DT-10 sports a P.McC. Stock-Lock with heavy looking wood, no idea what his gun weighs but I'd guess it isn't the proverbial 8 or 9 pounder either? Common sense carries a lot of weight when it comes to recoil?

    Hap
     
  17. Shipbuilder

    Shipbuilder TS Member

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    I am recoil sensative and have a PFS stock on a MX2000 unsingle and a custom fitted Wenig stock on a 1100. The 1100 also has a mercury reducer in the mag tube.

    Using 1 oz loads I think the recoil is about the same in both guns, i.e. very light and tolerable. The difference is in the movement sensation with the PFS. Further, if the PFS is set too light I tend to get movement when I mount the gun.

    With this set up the 1100 is a bit heavier than the MX2000. I have not actually weighed either but my guess is the 1100 is approaching 10 lbs.

    Jim
     
  18. yansica1

    yansica1 Member

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    Subject: Which Recoils Less?
    From: Hap MecTweaks

    I think a lot of people neglect/overlook the real benefit of a fitted shotgun stock. Reducing felt recoil is but a side benefit, the real plus is, it allows a lot more consistent shot placement time after time! A perfectly fitted to you stock that's very lightweight will still rattle your teeth with a light shotgun

    ====================================================



    Correct. Don`t you just love it when some people think they can dial out recoil by expert fitting!! Unless you happen to think you can change Newton`s law while you`re at it?!
     
  19. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    Hi Rog, may make part of the Cardinal Classic after the Grand, if I'm lucky! I love the OSS, one of my favorite shoots to attend and wish I could this year but I just can't swing it. Say howdy to all the guys.

    Hap
     
  20. RFGA2

    RFGA2 Member

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    Matt:

    i have had a soft touch on my K-32 and it worked a lot better than on aold Edwards reducer. I bought
    a PFS from Bob Schultz and he fitted it to me and it works great. It is truly very adjustable and I don't need a lot of castoff/on changes and it dows take the recoil out of the gun. It hold up well and with the exception of "loosening up " once in a while it is a pleasure to shoot. If I bought another gun, I would probably get another. I have shot a friends K-80 that has the "harlan Cambell" type stock and he hass about 4 pounds of weight in the gun. It also is a non-recoiling gun but it is a pain to lug around. He is AAA in singles and AAA in doubles and it works for him.....

    Bob Gibson
    Charlotte, NC
     
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