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Where do you get your Sonic Ears from?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Shooting Jack, Apr 20, 2011.

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  1. Shooting Jack

    Shooting Jack Active Member

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    I wanted to purchase a couple pair of these ear plugs by North but haven't found anyplace locally that sells them. Where do you get yours from? Thanks for your response. Jackie B.
     
  2. Rick Barker

    Rick Barker Well-Known Member

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    I have two pair I have had since the mid 70's, but not seen marketed in stores.

    You can buy them online, lookup the above web address.
     
  3. CharlesK80

    CharlesK80 Member

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    Google says no such site!
     
  4. Rick Barker

    Rick Barker Well-Known Member

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    Interesting, I found it on google and looked at the site.
    It did not work for me when I clicked on the post either.
    Well, do a search. If it came up for me, it should come up for anybody else.
     
  5. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    earplugstore... 918.478.5500 $10/1 + shpg; $8.50/2+ + shpg...

    FYI - new name, Health Enterprises ACU Health Shooters Ear Plug = Sonic II

    Jay
     
  6. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

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    Jack you might want to do a little research on those plugs they are not the best choice in protection. The Noise reduction is only NRR 6dB.

    The foam Plugs have NRR 33dB the foam plugs offer much more protection for your hearing. Long term that is.

    Bob Lawless
     
  7. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    As Bob stated, Sonics are only slightly more helpful than wearing nothing at all (probably less helpful than stuffing cigarette filters in your ears).
     
  8. CalvinMD

    CalvinMD Well-Known Member

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    my mom...no wisecracks please
     
  9. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    Not the best. Your hearing is worth more that exposing them to the amount of damaging sound that those things let through.
     
  10. Shooting Jack

    Shooting Jack Active Member

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    Thanks for your responses. I see a lot of shooters that use them and some I asked indicated that you could carry on a conversation with them in but sounds from gunfire was all but gone. I have some electronics type that work well but they interfere with the stock mount. Thanks again and will pass them up. Jackie B.
     
  11. Rick Barker

    Rick Barker Well-Known Member

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    You might want to look at electronic ear plugs. There is a company called E.A.R. Inc, here in Boulder Colorado that makes them and they work similar to electronic muffs, except they are full plug.

    Also, many grocery stores and drug stores that carry the foam plugs, also carry a wax plug that you shape over the entrance of your ear, but do not put it into the canal. You can use a couple of times before it gets dirty and covers the entire ear opening.

    I like Peltors, I have had them for many years and they help keep my hat on during windy days here in Colorado. The Peltors have a taper or slot along the bottom of the muffs that keeps the muffs from coming in contact with the stock.
     
  12. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

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    Rick with all due respect to your thoughts here take it from one who wears 6,000 dollars worth of equipment in his head. It isn't worth the risk to your hearing to wear something that requires the muzzle blast to close the circuit to protect your hearing. Even milliseconds of that sound getting through will not do the hearing any good.

    The fact that he is looking for something that will do this.

    "I see a lot of shooters that use them and some I asked indicated that you could carry on a conversation with them in but sounds from gunfire was all but gone."

    Only tells me that he already has some hearing loss or he would be able to hear the conversation with regular plugs in. The conversation is not important on the line protecting your hearing is. There is plenty of time for conversation after you leave the firing line.

    Bob Lawless
     
  13. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    I've worn them for a decade and my audiologist docs my hearing and I've had no loss at any part of the spectrum. The poor NRR comes from the methodology used to assess their noise reduction... if they were truly as poor as the sages of hearing protection state, I would've expected the product to be pulled years ago and NO company would buy the patented technology and continue to market a LOSER...

    Best damn plug in my opinion - not only does it limit impulse noise, but I don't have to remove the plugs to participate in a room level conversation. With room level conversation at 70db, anyone would be hardpressed to hear muffled conversation at 30db less...

    Regards all,

    Jay
     
  14. Rick Barker

    Rick Barker Well-Known Member

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    Bob, I am not recommending he buy them, I am just telling him about them and in addition to the wax and foam plugs.

    I wear the Peltors and they are shut off when I shoot. I turn them on, when I want to carry on a conversation with another person and there is still gunfire going on in the background when I am off the squad, or I am pulling for a squad. They allow me to hear the shooters calls and still offer me some protection. Where we shoot, the boys in the F16's come out to play and usually have their afterburners on when they fly overhead. Again, the Peltors help me hear the voices over the din of the jets.

    But, thank you for your interest in my hearing. So far have not suffered any loss, and want to do everything I can to protect my hearing. My grandmother was extremely hard of hearing and had to wear Beltones.

    I usually carry around a set of foam plugs in my car and have found them handy for outdoor events, such as hot rod shows, and theaters as it seems they always have the volumne turned up way too high to my liking. Even plugs do not seem to do the job for me, as I can hear loud noise transmitted through the boney area behind my ear.

    I should have suggested that Shooting Jack consult his audiologist, for advice and recommendations, but was amiss for not doing so.
     
  15. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    "The poor NRR comes from the methodology used to assess their noise reduction"

    Wrong, they have an NRR of 6 because they are junk. They will continue to sell them as long as uninformed people buy them.
     
  16. Rick Barker

    Rick Barker Well-Known Member

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    Bob Lawless,

    Hope I did not appear callous not to aknowledge your statement about having to wear the hardware you mentioned in your last post.

    I can only imagine how difficult it must be to go through life with hearing loss. Just wanted you to know I know it has to be difficult to endure.
     
  17. KENENT1

    KENENT1 Active Member

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    I use the home silicone sets, and last week tried the sonics and they hurt my ears...I don't think they work very well either.


    tony
     
  18. 85TTR

    85TTR Member

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    I use them and have no problems. Hearing tested as insurance allows. All good Paul.


    Hearing II Protectors
    NRR 18db
    Mechanical valve design
    Soft silicon rubber
    Mechanical valve blocks out loud impulse noises while permitting normal conversation. Eliminates the "plugged up" feeling you get from most hearing protection. Soft silicone rubber cushion for comfort.
    Available: One Pair, $9.99




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    [​IMG]
     
  19. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    85TTR , 18db NRR is all you get, not very good. There is no magic.
    Some people are just tougher than others and hear ok despite never wearing earplugs but they are a rare breed. Don't risk your hearing to cheap gimmicks.
     
  20. 85TTR

    85TTR Member

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    Peak sound levels from rifles and shotguns can range from 132 dB SPL (sound pressure level is another unit of measurement) for small-caliber rifles to more than 172 dB SPL for high-powered firearms. Americans collectively own more than 230 million guns, and more than half of men in the American industrial workforce occasionally use guns. The National Rifle Association estimates that 60 to 65 million Americans collectively own more than 230 million guns. Because guns are so prevalent in our culture, shooting firearms is the most important source of excessive noise outside the workplace. The severity of injury produced by impulsive noise exposure and the prevalence of shooting by Americans makes gun noise America's most serious non-occupational noise hazard. The acoustic energy in a single report from a high-powered rifle or shotgun is equivalent to almost 40 hours of continuous exposure at 90 dBA. In other words, 1 bullet equals 1 week of hazardous occupational noise exposure. An avid target shooter can be exposed to an entire year's worth of hazardous occupational noise in just a few minutes (Clark & Bohne, 1999; NRA, 1999).


    Table 2. SHOTGUN NOISE DATA (DECIBEL AVERAGES)

    .410 Bore

    28" barrel 150dB

    26" barrel 150.25dB

    18 " barrel 156.30dB


    20 Gauge

    28" barrel 152.50dB

    22" barrel 154.75dB


    12 Gauge

    28" barrel 151.50dB

    26" barrel 156.10dB

    18 " barrel 161.50dB
     
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