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When to start a new young shooter??

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by tjwatc, Jan 17, 2008.

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  1. tjwatc

    tjwatc TS Member

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    Just wondering, how old any of you had your kids start shooting and with what type and gauge of shotgun?

    I started this game later in life, but I have 2 young boys that I think would be interested in trapshooting eventually (current ages are 5 & 2). My 5 year old goes with me to the club, but I think is still a little scared with the noise and me staying on him to make sure he does not get in trouble.

    Thanks
     
  2. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    When? When they can safely handle a gun, as well as physically handle it.

    For the 5 year old, one of the shotgun gurus (Brister?) recommended using a BB gun with the sights removed to shoot ping pong balls. Said this was excellent shotgun training. This would also make a good training gun for safe gun handling.
     
  3. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    I think a top end trainer told me when a kid weighs 75 lb, they are big enough to handle a firearm. The BB gun works, and the little rascals will soon be wearing the ping pong ball out!
     
  4. bridgetoofar

    bridgetoofar TS Member

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    When? When he's mature enough to be safe.

    What? Depends on the kid's size, but most young kids would be best served with a 20ga 1100 (IMO).

    5 might be a little on the young side for a shotgun, but perfect for a supervised Red Ryder BB gun.
     
  5. JB Logan Co. Ohio

    JB Logan Co. Ohio TS Member

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    I agree with the above. When they're old/big enough to hold up a 20 ga. 1100 they're old enough to shoot. Be careful to not start them on a nongas operated auto (20 ga.) it will beat the snot out of them. 20 ga. overall has higher pressure and will result in more recoil than light loaded 12's. My younger son got along much better (when first starting out) with my old BT-99 than the Benelli (20 ga.) he began with.

    JB=Jerry Beach 8503917
     
  6. Kolarmaxx

    Kolarmaxx TS Member

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    Started my son at ten in ATA and he shoots a 12 gauge 525 and now shooting my 34" unsingle Kolar pretty well. I would have started him earlier but I have an ex-wife problem that prevented that. Started on a 20 gauge, but it actually kicked worse than a 12 with 1 oz loads. There is a 6 year old that shoots ATA at our Jersey clubs that avgs in the 60's and he handles himself real well with a 20 gauge. I guess it all depends on the maturity of the kid. And I would probably recommend jumping right to a 12 gauge with light loads. I would also recommend a break gun from the get go. We started on a Beretta 391 20 gauge and it hammer fired a couple of times and scared the crap out of him. Two many things to think about. Break gun is much safer and the lights loads will overcome the recoil issues that may lean you towards a semi-auto. But again, everyone is different.
     
  7. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    When he is about 45 and can afford shooting.
     
  8. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    I started my son at age nine with a cut down 20-gauge 1100. At age 12, he ran a 50-straight to win a league for his team with a 32" KS-5. Let them shoot at much as they want and learn at their pace and I think they'll learn faster than if you make them shoot when they don't feel like it or decline to take them shooting because YOU don't feel like it.

    Ed
     
  9. breakingclays99

    breakingclays99 Member

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    I began shooting trap at age 14 with a 20 gauge Remington 1100. Then I was moved up to the 12 gauge 1100. A great trap gun I had soon after that was a Rottweil 720 Super Trap Single, but there really aren't that many of those around anymore.

    On the other hand, my grandfather had me shooting rifle when I was 6.

    I think you should get children into the game as soon as they're able. We need more young people coming into the sport. And whatever you do, don't provide a gun or shells that kick too much - I've witnessed that - A kid didn't want to keep shooting because the shells his Dad was providing, coupled with the gun he was using, just kicked him to death. As a result, I don't think he wants to shoot very much anymore because he is afraid of recoil, which can be lessened if you try!

    Melissa Barthel
     
  10. jakearoo

    jakearoo Active Member

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    Truth of the matter is JimBailey is correct about golf. You might also add in tennis. Sports they can do the rest of their lives. Upscale. Fun. Healthy. And, if they are good enough, very profitable.

    God, I love to shoot. I do it 4 days a week. But I do realize that whether I like it or not, it is a dying and small time game. Jake

    PS. I taught my boy to shoot pellet guns at 9 and by 12 he was shooting trap,sporters, and skeet quite well.
     
  11. oleolliedawg

    oleolliedawg Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    Frank Little suggested 75 lbs. as a target weight for starting the new shooter. I started mine at 10 1/2 and he broke 25 less than 3 weeks later.

    Of course he started Skeet with a 28 Ga. Model 32 at age 8. No recoil issues and a great way to learn proper technique!!
     
  12. lumper

    lumper TS Member

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    Start him a learnin as soon as he's big enough to start a totin yer guns and shells from the car to the field for ya.

    BTW if all he can handle is 1 box of shells at a time thats alright cause ya cant shoot more than 1 box at a time ... he can make trips ... it will build character.
     
  13. tjwatc

    tjwatc TS Member

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    Thanks guys. I knew I needed to wait a few more years, but I just wanted to hear from those of you who had experience in this area.

    At the age of 5 he already likes golf and baseball, but he wants to go the club with Dad and then next year go hunting next year. I've told him, if he can sit quitely next to the tree in our backyard and not move for 30 minutes then he can go turkey hunting. I figure that I have atleast 2 or 3 more years until he can accomplish this little task.

    Thanks again
     
  14. Texas Crew'd

    Texas Crew'd Member

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    Tj,

    I would submit this to you. My brother, sister and I grew up hunting and fishing. I can remember as early as six y/o shooting with dad in our back yard and shooting squirels and groundhogs with my grandfather around the same age.

    My brother and I both have 2 daughters. We have trucked them around with us since they were old enough to stand up straight. My standard statement is "the good thing about our girls is they've been in fishing and hunting camps since they could walk, the bad thing is they've been in fishing and hunting camps since they could walk".

    Wingshooting is what brought my youngest daughter into her love of competition and lead into clay target shooting.

    Now trucking the kids around with us has probably cost us a lot of game. We did not always limit out on birds or tag a buck. They knew how to lock the hubs in by age 7 and drive a standard by age 13. The can launch and load a boat quicker than most men as well as clean birds,field dress and quarter. My oldest daughter (24) now has 2 sons ages 2 and 3. The 3 year old is stalking a deer in the living room with his airplane pistol as I write this. They've been on hunting trips already with dad and mom as well as grandpa and aunt Caity. They've been to the range with Grandma as well. As time alows they will stand on the 16 with a couple af other youngsters and shoot targets with their fingers, sticks or break action toy shotguns (I love these as they can be taught how to carry, check the chambers and how to rack and store them). This is a blast and we always make a big deal of this. As far as age to shoot I truelly believe it is an individual assessment based on safety and maturity. Proper gun selection is essential. I've seen 8 y/o girls that could safely handle a shotgun on the line and 16 y/o boys that did not have the capacity to accomplish this. As they are growing and learning you can have a 5 or 10 target competition. Then go out to lunch or dinner. I started my youngest in the field with me with a red rider bb gun and observed her, if I remeber correctly she hunted with that bb gun for 2 years. When I felt she was ready and had mastered the safety aspect I graduated her up. Get them used to eye and ear protection. Look into a local 4-H club.

    If you ask my youngest (now 17) what her favorite meal is she will readilily tell you half a cold McDonalds hamburger and a can of cold spaghetti ohs shared with her cousin on top of a mountain on a cold afternoon in west Texas while mule deer hunting. We didn't get a deer that year.

    My youngest is currently filing out college applications. One particular application has an essay portion. As I read it I teared up and this is what I would like to leave you with. She wrote something like this.

    I have learned more from my father than anyone else spending an untold number of hours in the field without a word being spoken.

    Sincerely,
    Garry Barney
     
  15. buckwheat

    buckwheat TS Member

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    I would prefer a average sized 5th grader, minimum. Younger than that and they don't have the strength to handle or in some cases load the gun, certainly not for a full round. If they can't control the gun they won't hit anything. Go with a 12 gauge gas auto with a short barrel. Dad or Grampa's old pump will just beat the crap out of them. Light loads are the rule of the day. Get them shooting and make it fun.
    Dan
     
  16. Phil Ross

    Phil Ross TS Member

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    When they become interested in the game of trap, and they can safely handle a gun, as well as physically handle it.

    Regards, Phil Ross
     
  17. YUKONJACK

    YUKONJACK TS Member

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    I think all you guys are leaving out the most important step in starting a kid shooting and that is require them to take and pass a "HUNTER SAFETY COURSE"!!!!.Then take them out and show them what that SHOTGUN will do to that old hard watermelon and compare it to their own skin.Believe me that makes an IMPRESSION.Yukon Jack
     
  18. Browning Guy

    Browning Guy TS Member

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    I started when I was 10 with a 20 gauge. I easily moved up into a 12 gauge. I could easily handle the 12 gauge. I have brothers, one of them started when he was 9. He had a little harder time than me and moved up a little slower. My other brother is in 5th grade now and he has been having a hard time with a 20ga. My littlest brother is in 1st grade and he can almost handle a 20ga. I guess it all depends on their physical levels and their safety. Make sure that they get safety drilled into them ASAP. That is what my dad did to us.

    Happy Shooting!
     
  19. 6913F

    6913F TS Member

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    I started my son at 10. He used a Rem 1187 20 ga. Light gun, little recoil.
    One thing to remember, some kids learn faster than others. For some unknown reason, kids will sometimes listen to the shooting advice to others instead of dad!

    Larry
     
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