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When Grouse were plentiful.

Discussion in 'Hunting' started by mxsst, Dec 22, 2016.

  1. mxsst

    mxsst Active Member

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    When Grouse were plentiful.

    On 30 August 1888, Lord Walsingham had a remarkable day shooting on Blubberhouses Moor, Yorkshire when he killed 1070 grouse. The day started at 05:12 with the first of twenty drives, assisted by two teams of forty beaters, two loaders and three guns. During the sixteenth drive he shot 94 grouse in 21 minutes; a killing rate of one every13 seconds. The last drive finished at 18:45 and his Lordship managed to shoot fourteen on the walk home![6]

    Was rated as one of the finest game shots of his day.
    Phil
     
  2. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    Yes, they did overdue it a bit back then.
     
  3. fhelbig

    fhelbig Member

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    I put out 63 Ringnecks and about 75 bobwhite a few years ago .We saw no Bobwhite and 3 or 4 ringnecks over the next 3 years. I wonder what happened to them there was plenty of cover and food . I am thinking about raising 500 Bobwhite at one time and see if any survive after turning loose. The grouse are few any more ,use to see a few on the farm every year now none .
     
  4. octoberclaire

    octoberclaire Active Member

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    My brother in laws dad raised and released 300 quail about five years ago on a pretty nice piece of quail cover next to a corn field. The next spring two birds could be accounted for. By fall nothing. There are so many hawks and owls amoung everything else they don't stand a chance. I've put quail out for my dog and by the time that I 4- wheeled back and got the dog next door there was a hawk standing on one. This happened more than once. He also raises pheasants and claims that many of the pen raised hens are sterile and that they may lay but not hatch. I have released 30 quail next door in beautiful cover with food and a water source for dog work. All gone within two weeks without a trace. The farmer next door trapped 50 raccoon on 110 acres in one year. What chance do they have.
     
  5. fhelbig

    fhelbig Member

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    I would have never thought they would clean them out so quick . We have a lot of hawks and owls here ,fishers.We also had a lot of coyote but they put a bounty on them not so many now. They use to have a bounty on hawks and owls and fox years ago here, that might be the answer but will never happen again. One of the amish boys told me that hawks set on fence post and trees on his farm and just explode for some reason wish they would do it here.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2016
  6. big kahuna

    big kahuna Well-Known Member

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    Way to many predators for small game to survive the way they used to.
    George
     
  7. DONNE

    DONNE Active Member

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    The winter Coopers and feral cats kill everything around here. I try to work the dogs on pigeons in winter and as soon as the Coops see me in the field, it's like ringing the dinner bell!! Forget the Quail. They don't have a chance, and the pen raised birds have no clue how to avoid predators. Back in the '50s we had at least 4 coveys on our small place. The Coops are real brave too. I've had them sitting and pulling on my birds flight pens. Sting 'em with the pellet gun, and they just look at me. Can't shoot here at home, but the big grounds where we train the owner says, "let your conscious be your guide". Just don't leave anything laying around.

    Hope we didn't hi-jack mxsst's thread .......
     
  8. pheasantmaster

    pheasantmaster Well-Known Member

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    We raised over 1200 pheasants nine years ago. Started with 1500. They commenced to killing themselves so late August we released them on four different parcels of land. Opening day of season that fall, my son took a group to one parcel and they scene 3 birds total. Him, I, a landowner and his son hunted the other three parcels on Sunday. My son and I had fair to Midland dogs back then. We found not evidence of a single bird on all three parcels.

    Conclusion: we raised one heck of a smorgasbord for the predator population.

    Three years ago two lads that were part of our opening day group were raising pheasants for sale. A neighbor next door to a good friend of mine bought 150 birds from them to be released the night before opening day. On opening day we quit our hunting about three in the afternoon so everybody could get cleaned up before our annual celebration that night. I drove around alittle before heading in and on that parcel where those 150 birds were released had 9 Cooper's working the field.
     
  9. Paladin

    Paladin Well-Known Member

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    It's a shame that many of the predators are protected.
    I grew up hunting grouse. Haven't heard a grouse drum in 20 years now. They seemed to disappear about the same time the turkeys started to over-run the whole countryside, woods and all, with a fine tooth comb..
     
  10. flashmax

    flashmax Well-Known Member

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    You have to use the right equipment.

    IMG_0678.JPG
     
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  11. MackC85

    MackC85 Active Member

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    Beep-Beep!!

    My favorite Saturday morning fare........

    Sent from my SM-J320P using Tapatalk
     
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  12. Paladin

    Paladin Well-Known Member

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    Yep. Beep Beep. LOL.

    The trouble is, there aren't any around to get..
     
  13. mxsst

    mxsst Active Member

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    Maybe a difficult question to answer ? but, which States have the better conservation laws to protect game birds and ground nesting birds from predators. Are you allowed to take limited action to protect and conserve game stock and other smaller wildlife species.
    Thanks all
    Phil
     
  14. fhelbig

    fhelbig Member

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    Not that i know of. Most of birds if not all are protected under federal law . These guys give nasty huge fines ,prison. They don't give a hoot about our grouse,phesants,or bobwhite.
     
  15. fhelbig

    fhelbig Member

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    After reading these post and thinking about it , you guys are right its the predators that are getting them .Dad who passed away several years ago said kill them hawks,owls . I did not, and after these post and seeing all the redtails and no rabbits or birds that is the problem.
    Last spring we saw a lot of rabbits this summer I saw a lot of hawks now no rabbits. The hunting isn't like it use to be and never will be the same until they get of some of the predator birds.
     
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  16. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    My dad (He would have been 87) said when he was kid , they had predator, sparrow, starling, and rat bounties, even in school. Kids would bring a tail to school and collect a bounty. Hawk hunting was a weekend sport. Guys would shoot them out of the air while hovering, on poles, wherever. Coon were always hunted and trapped as many of the old guys were coon doggers. Now, only a few trap.

    We raised 40 pheasant one year and we live trapped 23 coon, 14 possum, and 2 mink trying to get into the pen.

    Back in 40' and 50's we had lots of pheasant. We had better habitat (fence rows, overgrown creeks and waterways, and unfarmed corners) but we had Predator control too.
     
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  17. mxsst

    mxsst Active Member

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    Is there funding from the State for habitat improvements and game cover crops, what predators are you allowed to trap ?
    Thanks all
    Phil
     
  18. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Banned User Banned

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    Pen raised birds have almost zero chance of surviving in the wild. Not only do they have no clue of predators, but also the same taught basics of finding food by foraging. Add in severe winter weather or freezing rain and even less survive till spring. Because the hens are raised in such tight and non-natural settings with grass and cover, they have no nesting instincts once out in the wild even if they survive to spring. The neighbors father raises pheasants and the leftover hens in the spring just lay eggs on the bare ground anywhere they happen to be at the time. There are eggs scattered all around the pens. He used to gather the eggs and incubate those for the next falls use, but the fertile percentage was not great. Now he buys guaranteed eggs each year.

    I have released 10 birds each spring in the back of the house hoping they would take to a natural population. Each time the first day there would be a Red Tailed Hawk pair sitting in the big oak tree. If you did not see them they were in the tree line feasting, or killing another unsuspecting release. I seen one of them kill two birds in less than a minute. I ran out there and found four dead birds. This same pair that winters here into spring has killed wild ducks that land in the field next to the house also while they are concentrating on their spring mating rituals.
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2016
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  19. twostraight

    twostraight Member

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    Stl Flyn nailed it. Pen raised birds are too stupid to survive. Lots of wild pheasant in South Dakota and lots of coyotes and raptors. Habitat is more important than predators if you are talking wild birds. Now if you are talking pen raised birds, release em, shoot em, take em home and eat em.
     
  20. fhelbig

    fhelbig Member

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    They got the turkeys back they should be able to get the phesants , grouse,and bobwhite back We may have to learn how to raise them also Get the predators down and I think they will learn to survive .