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Whats the Diff Between Littleton & Stewart?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Bawana, Mar 13, 2007.

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  1. Bawana

    Bawana TS Member

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    I have read alot about Littleton and read some on Stewart shot makers. No one here has really said whats the difference are between the two. What are they?
     
  2. Jim101

    Jim101 Active Member

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    I think the biggest difference is the ladel material. Littleton is aluminum, The Stewart is cast iron. There may be others I'm not aware of.





    Jim
     
  3. Bawana

    Bawana TS Member

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    Ajax, they do come in double dipper or two spoon units. I have read here that there are other differences between the two but no one has really said what they were. Some here have said that Stewart is cast iron spoon and its 220V. what makes the Stewart a better unit?
     
  4. Grumpy

    Grumpy TS Member

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    Unruly You have answered your own question on the difference between the Littleton and the Stewart shot makers.One is a copy of the other so they are very similar. First cast iron retains heat and alum dissapates heat.Second 220 volts ensures lots of heat to help eliminate temp fluctuation when adding ingots. I do not know what the difference in the heating element wattage is? Thats the way I see it. Wayne
     
  5. Ellen

    Ellen TS Member

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    I have been out of town a couple of days and just catching up on the threads posted. There is a difference in the Better Shotmaker(Stewart's machine) vs the Littleton:
    1. The Better Shotmaker has a heavy duty 4-turn 220volt burner made by Hotpoint. The Littleton in the past only had a 3-turn light duty burner.
    2. The cast iron ladle holds the heat better than the Aluminum.
    3. All the wiring in the Better Shotmaker is #12 heatshield wiring that is good up to 700 degrees and doesn't burn out very easily.
    4. The Better Shotmaker uses fireproofing insulation.
    5. The cast iron ladles are not sold separately because they don't fit the Littleton.
    6. Jim test drives every shotmaker before it is shipped to make sure it is making good shot.
    7. Jim has a flusher to flush the drippers that comes with the machine that Littleton doesn't have.
    8. Jim sends complete instructions with every machine and will always answers any questions you might have about how to run the machine.
    Would like to know why some people have not been able to reach the Littleton Shotmaker distributors for extra parts and questions? This is the feedback Jim is getting when people call him. If you have any questions about the Better Shotmaker then give Jim a call at 256-587-0107.
    Several people have also told me they are not able to get into Jim's web page.
    The problem could be that you don't have compatible software or email service or maybe not typing in correct URL. Here it is again: http://www.geocities.com/jstewart1934/My_page.html
    Ellen
     
  6. IM390

    IM390 Member

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    Grumpy you have that backwards. Aluminum heats up faster and holds it heat longer than cast iron. That can be a blessing or a curse depending on how you use it. In bullet casting aluminum moulds will work faster because the lead has the time to form it's shape before cooling down, however, if the aluminum gets too hot the projectile will not form at all or be severly distorted as it attempts to cool. Cast iron is the one which takes longer to warm up but disapates it's heat faster. I suppose the difference is in the heat source. Most old timers prefer cast iron because the heat can be more easliy controled at the source instead of waiting for a hot mould to cool down to a usable temperature.
     
  7. scott k

    scott k TS Member

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    im390, i think you need to go back to school.
     
  8. IM390

    IM390 Member

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    Actually I have been back to school. I've been bullet casting for the last fifteen years with LEE Precision Aluminum moulds instead of Lyman cast iron moulds.
     
  9. 333t

    333t Member

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    I was wondering if rust is an issue with a cast iron ladle. The melting pots I use to clean up the wheel weights are made of cast iron and have developed rust coatings inside and out over time. Does the Stewart shotmaker get rusty and if so, does that cause any problems?

    The idea of a heavy cast iron unit sounds good to me but I know with my older Littleton, the drip ledge has to be kept smooth, clean, and coated with soap stone. Being aluminum, it doesn't rust. If it were made of cast iron it would seem likely to rust and get pitted over time.

    Phil
     
  10. scott k

    scott k TS Member

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    im 390, i will agree with you as for casting bullets, but not for making shot.

    as fsr as rust, no problems here. the littleton dripers are steal and will rust.
    as far as the lip goes, jim uses lyman bore grease, no need to be smooth.
    i wanted to tyr soapstone and chock, so i worked the lip smooth to do so . one is as good as the other as far as i can tell.

    i use brake fluid because i can wash in water.

    later scott
     
  11. Grumpy

    Grumpy TS Member

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    IM390 Must be a global warming thing --- "backwards"--- on the differences between cast iron and aluminum maybe but I will stick to my original post.Cast Iron takes longer to heat up but "retains"(holds on to the heat, it radiates the heat and gives off the heat slowly) the reason they used big old cast iron radiators in steam and hot water HEATING systems, they maintain a uniform heat.Aluminum heats up faster and "dissapates"(gives off the heat it radiates the heat, gives off the heat faster)the reason they use alum fins in automobile COOLING systems radiators.
    Scott's video showed use how his cast iron ladels once heated up to operating temperature maintained the heat with no effect, on the nozzle performace when he kept dropping cold(not pre-heated) ingots into the ladle what was the count up to 4 or 5 was it not??? Excellent demonstration on how cast iron "Maintains" a "Constant" and "Uniform" heat.Again thank you Scott for your video.

    As for bullet moulds like you said the "old timers" prefered iron moulds Casting babbit bearings is along the same principal as casting bullets everthing has to be up to the proper temperature and kept at that temperature while the alloy is poured into the mould then slowly cooled at a controlled rate to prevent shrinkage of your bearing.Your right "old timers" prefer iron moulds I wouldn't give you shelf space for aluminum bullet moulds now a jello moulds is an all together different matter.
    Having my info backward--- NO --- I don't think so, working as an Industrial Millwright and Metal Fabricator for the past 38 years I have a weee bit of knowledge on the characteristics of ferrous and alloy metals.Backwards ---NO--- I will stick to my original post.

    333t ??? Your question ??? about rust on cast iron ladles--- when you are finnished a shot making session turn off the heat and let the shot maker cool down with the ladles full(covered)with lead this will prevent the oxidiation from forming on the ladles and nozzles,you may want to give any exposed iron surfaces a rub with some light oil.On start up the ladle and nozzles will heat up to temperature,melting the lead,the light oil will smoke off, give the nozzles a gentle tap and you should be back in production remember good cooks never wash a good cast iron frying pan they just wipe it out clean while it is still warm,the cooking oils that was in the pan protects the pan from rust. Bye for now and enjoy your day. Wayne
     
  12. bigk

    bigk TS Member

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    can anyone supply diagrams for the stewart,still cannot get the web site. i am considering making my own shot maker, as everyone elce seems to copy.i think us shooters should stick together, why should we make mr j stewart and mr littleton any richer.we are a fairly bright bunch and should be able to build our own shot makers at a fraction of their HIGH costs and maybe improve on their machines. so any ideas would be appreciated.

    by the way this is my first post please dont think it presumptous of me to fire this volley over the manafacturers heads,but i am an ordinary working man who enjoys his shooting both clay and game and the way everything is going we should enjoy our sport for as long as possible and as cheaply as possible.
    Kieran. Proud to be irish.
     
  13. scott k

    scott k TS Member

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    3/8 hardened bolts.
     
  14. plinker61

    plinker61 TS Member

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    the differance is not only the machine,but customer service,ive been looking at both units for over 2 months now and here is what ive found.#1)littelton,ive email'd them 3 times,WITH NO RESPONSE FROM BBULLETS,ALSO I HAVE CALLED THEIR PHONE # SEVERAL TIMES(5 OR 6) AND IT GOES TO A CELLPHONE MAIL BOX SAYING"MAIL BOX IS FULL PLEASE TRY BACK LATER" I DID GET THROUGH ONCE LEFT A MESSAGE,AND A REP CALLED ME BACK 4 DAYS LATER.so if you have a problem you may have to wait a while to get a response,let alone if you try to purchase a machine,or parts,or accessorys, they may be a while getting back with you(if ever?),NOT A GOOD way to do business.
    #2) mr stewarts machine.i have called to talk to jim twice and both times he answerd all my questions,and is willing to share his tips from many years of his shot makeing experience.and each time i went away feeling good about spending my hard earnd $$$$$ with him,also if you read the magority of the posts on this site the most of the people haveing problems are useing litteltons.not to say its the machine,because there is going to be a learning phase,but when you get a stewart machine it has all ready run some shot.mark jones
     
  15. Jim101

    Jim101 Active Member

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    Ajax, Please let us know how the ss drippers work out. I've had thoughts about that myself. Just don't have access to a shop to make them right now.





    Jim
     
  16. Bawana

    Bawana TS Member

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    What drill bit do I need for shot size 4, 5, 6 shot?
     
  17. bigk

    bigk TS Member

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    Thanks for your replies, most helpful.

    kieran.proud to be irish
     
  18. Dave P

    Dave P TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    When you refer to the "ladle", is this a part of the shotmaker or a separate spoon affair. If it is separate please explain how it is used. Thanks. Dave
     
  19. Ellen

    Ellen TS Member

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    I certainly am enjoying the chatter about the differences of a Littleton and a Better Shotmaker. For those of you that have Littletons it seems you are having a problem with either a ladle needing replacing or extra drippers.
    Jim Stewart isn't in the business of replacing Littleton Shotmaker parts. He will however sell you drippers because his and Littletons drippers will interchange.
    Very few people have asked for Double Drip Drippers. Jim makes them but only a few have asked for them. Seems they don't have enough time to keep the single drippers loaded with lead ingots and the Double Bowl Shotmaker really keeps them humping to keep it loaded.
    Call Jim Stewart at 256-587-0107, he will be glad to talk with you about his Better Shotmaker and answer any questions.
    The only stupid question is the one you didn't ask.
    Thank You,
    Ellen
     
  20. Bawana

    Bawana TS Member

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