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What's the best semi auto liteweight rifle to buy

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by warren, Sep 17, 2009.

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  1. warren

    warren Member

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    What

    I've decided that I want a lite weight, powerfull, semi auto rifle with a large magazine and I'm not up to date on them. What's the best for the money these days. I know quite a bit about shotguns but haven't kept up with rifles.

    warren
     
  2. ffkane

    ffkane TS Member

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    If you are looking for something that is not expensive to shot i would go with a Ruger 10/22. They are a nice light weight carbine and you can purchase mags/drums upto 50 rounds. They are fail safe and many manufactures make numorus after market goodies.
     
  3. Bluzman98

    Bluzman98 Member

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    What caliber?

    Jim C
     
  4. BrowningPotato

    BrowningPotato TS Member

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    I would definately stick with the Ar15 platform. It is time tested and simply the best out there. There are many AR variants these days in a variety of calibers (204 ruger, 223, 308) just to name a few. It will depend on what you want to do with the rifle as far as what manufacturer to reccomend. If you want to stick to hunting, Remington makes a variantspecifically designed for the hunter, but other manufacturers will work as well. I carry an AR everyday for work and have come to be quite familiar with the platform and manufacturers. If you have any questions about various manufacturers feel free to PM me.
     
  5. andybull

    andybull Active Member

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    Get a JP LRP07 in either .260 or .308.
     
  6. Steve W

    Steve W Well-Known Member

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    Depend on your definition of "powerful",

    In light weight rifles,

    1) HK PS-90 in 5.7x28, standard magazine is 50 rounds.

    2) AR in 5.56 or 7.62x39 with 30 rounds.

    3) Ruger MINI-14 in 5.56 or 7.62x39 with 30 rounds.

    Anything larger than that will not be light weight.
     
  7. warren

    warren Member

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    Thanks for the advice that Ruger Mini 14 sounds like what I'm looking for in 223. Where's the best place to buy one?

    warren
     
  8. wayneo

    wayneo Active Member

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    Kel-Tec SU-16C. .223 weights less than five pounds, made in USA, fires with stock folded, fun to shoot, lifetime guarantee, uses AR-15 mags. What not to like? Wayne
     
  9. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

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  10. BrowningPotato

    BrowningPotato TS Member

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    The mini 14 is a little lighter than the AR15, however that is its only advantage. They generally have thin barrels that tend to become inaccurate when it gets hot. Also, it will not hold its value NEARLY as well as an AR. It is your money and if a mini 14 will serve your purposes better then thats what you should buy. However, the AR is def. more gun for the money and should be strongly considered.
     
  11. warren

    warren Member

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    Thanks again I'll sure look into the AR.

    warren
     
  12. warren

    warren Member

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    I look them up boy did I get an education thanks again.

    warren
     
  13. stokinpls

    stokinpls Well-Known Member

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    If you want to jump into .30 cal instead .223 this is where I'd start. RRA also makes an excellent line of .223s as well. Good luck.
     
  14. warren

    warren Member

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    One of the ones I'm looking at is the Ruger SR556, anybody know about that one??

    warren
     
  15. Remstar311

    Remstar311 Member

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    I like the looks of them. They are a brand new this year I believe. Seem to be very compact. You could look into an AR-15 M4 type. Along the same lines as far as size and with the collapsable stock, more traditional looking though. Definitely cheaper.
     
  16. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    What are you going to do with the rifle? Hunting? Hunting what? Plinking? Target shooting? A bug out gun for the end of the world? Budget? Once these parameters are known you can be guided better.
     
  17. BrowningPotato

    BrowningPotato TS Member

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    There is a write up on the Ruger SR556 in this months American Rifleman. I have not read the article but I noticed it was on the cover. As far as brands go, however, they all will likely serve your purpose. IMO for around the house use, plinking, hunting, etc. all brands will likely perform equally well, at least relatively close. If you were in law eforcement, military, or civillian contracting where ultimate reliability were key I would stick with Colt, LMT, Noveske, or other tier one manufacturers, other than that any should be fine (I personally stay away from Bushmaster but that is a personal preference). Keep in mind, top AR manufacturers demand a premium for their products but they are ultimately better quality and will hold their value better as well.
     
  18. warren

    warren Member

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    Brian I'm gonna use it for occasional target shooting and while I don't believe the end of the world is comming, better safe than sorry. New laws Gov't restrictions and so on. I definetly want it to be able to sustain fire without breaking down. Thanks Potato that's good information I'll check that out.

    warren
     
  19. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Well, the new Ruger AR is an unknown at this time. I've seen one, and it feels pretty much like any other ATAS AR15. However, it also has a tappet rod, instead of a direct impingment gas system (gas is channeled into the bolt carrier). It remains to be seen at this point if Ruger has done this right or not. I'm leery because they can't even copy a successful small pistol without needing a recall.<br>
    <br>
    Is a tappet rod needed on an AR15? For semi-auto use, I say no. There are plenty of high mileage AR15s that prove it is not needed. In fact, there are only four reasons to have a tappet rod AR15.<br>
    <br>
    One is that you're going to put it on a full auto lower, in which case there is a benefit because it runs cooler, and also does not bake the fouling into a hard crust.<br>
    <br>
    Second, you're going to be shooting a suppressor, in which case it helps keep excess gas out of the bolt, though you still get enough excess gas coming out of the breech when it opens that this often causes a big flame out the ejection port.<br>
    <br>
    Third is that you don't like to clean the bolt. This is probably the only real benefit for most semi-auto AR15 owners.<br>
    <br>
    Fourth is that it's "cool" and is just another ATAS thing to wow them at the gun range with.<br>
    <br>
    And the Ruger is not cheap. The ATAS model I looked at was just under $1700. That buys a lot of AR15 with conventional gas systems from Rock River, Bushmaster, S&W, DPMS, etc.<br>
    <br>
    What version of an AR15 should you get? From what you describe, the most useful will probably be an M4 pattern with a detachable carry handle. You can shoot it with the handle, or you can, down the road, replace the handle with optics, like a scope, an EOTech, or some other system. If you use something like the EOTech, you can install a standalone rear sight, and cowitness the red dot to the iron sights. If you know you want to go this route, then get the gun without a carry handle, and buy a small rear sight. If you're not sure what I'm talking about, then click these links:<br>
    <br>
    http://www.rockriverarms.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=category.display&category_id=223<br>
    This is a typical 16" CAR-15 in A2 (fixed carry handle) or A4 (removable carry handle, sometimes called A3 or flat top by other makers). The buttstock is shown as either fixed or telescoping, and either are optional. The point here is that the A4 pattern is more useful, because you can install a removable carry handle to make it emulate an A2, or you can add optics. AYou can add some optics to the fixed carry handle model, but you often do not get a good cheek weld.<br>
    <br>
    http://www.rockriverarms.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=category.display&category_id=225<br>
    This is the 20" rifle version, in both A2 or A4 configuration. It is not as handy in close quarters, like inside a dwelling, due to its length. But it also has less blast and noise, more velocity, and generally a bit more accuracy, mainly from a longer sight radius. It is also a bit heavier, though there are lightweight barrel options (Bushmaster for one offers the old A1 style "pencil barrels")<br>
    <br>
    You probably noticed the front sight being in the way of a scope. Well, actually it's not. Unless your scope is under 3x, you'll generally never know the sight tower is in the way. However, there are options to install a front sight block with a Picatinny rail. What's that? That's the "Weaver style" grooves you see on the flat top upper receiver. While a Picatinny (pick-a-tinny) is slightly different from Weaver, they are close enough that mounts for one will interchange with mounts for the other. Having both the front sight and receiver upper in Picatinny format gives you the ultimate in flexibility for sights and optics.<br>
    <br>
    http://www.rockriverarms.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=category.display&category_ID=206<br>
    This page gives you an idea of just how much you can customize the sights with a flat top AR15.<br>
    <br>
    http://www.bushmaster.com/catalog_main_index.asp<br>
    I've used Rock River as an example, but Bushmaster also has various AR15 configurations and parts.<br>
    <br>
    http://www.smith-wesson.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?catalogId=11101&storeId=10001&productId=44930&langId=-1&parent_category_rn=33803&isFirearm=Y"<br>
    S&W makes an M&P 15 "rifle" that's a clone of the M4 carbine. They don't offer much in the way of options, but the gun does have a detachable carry handle included. This is a good, solid gun, reliable, and I've seen prices around $980 at retail. I would consider this to be the basic AR15 for all around defensive use, but giving the most flexibility. The only thing I would prefer is a removable front sight, but that is not that big of an issue unless you are installing optics with no magnification or scopes going down into the 1x or 2x range. More S&W models here:<br>
    http://www.smith-wesson.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10001&catalogId=11101&categoryId=33803&top=Y<br>
    <br>
    Some states have banned some features. Like bayonet lugs, flash hiders, telescoping stocks, etc. You can order an AR15 from most makers that have been "neutered" to meet these laws.<br>
    <br>
    http://www.bushmaster.com/catalog_xm15_BCWA3S16D.asp<br>
    One AR15 that is "outside the box" is the Bushmaster Dissipator. This is a rifle configuration with a 16" barrel. Colt originally made these back in the early days of Vietnam as their Model 605, but they failed because of the short distance between the gas port (in the front sight tower) and the muzzle. Bushmaster got around this by installing a gas block further back. My link below shows my "Retro Dissipator" I built to emulate the Colt 605. The advantage of this rifle is that it is carbine length, with a 16" barrel, yet has the longer sight radius of the rifle. If you are only going to use iron sights, but want a short barrel, this gun might be the ticket.<br>
    http://www.trapshooters.com/noframes/cfpages/thread.cfm?threadid=167151
     
  20. BrowningPotato

    BrowningPotato TS Member

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    I have several AR's and my newest in an LMT piston gun. It is as accurate and has the same recoil as all my impingement guns. The piston gun is more expensive but I think the extra money is worth it. No, pistons are not ecessary for semi-auto use, however they are ultra reliable, run cooler (you can touch the bolt after dumping a mag and it is cool to the touch, try this with an impingement gun and you will lsoe your fingerprints), and cleanup is cake. I love my impingement guns too but I personally prefer my piston gun. In your case however, I would probably just get an impingement model. It will do everything you need and it is substantially cheaper than the piston gun.
     
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