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what you should know wood before making a stock

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by gun fitter, Aug 23, 2013.

  1. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,959
    Today I just got a blank set that was unusable for the project I have.
    It was filled with checks and I'm not confident that they would all machine out of the stock I intended on making.

    Here's a few pics of the offending piece of wood.
    gunfitter_2008_0303_1594.jpg
    It's the big one on the right.
    gunfitter_2008_0303_1595.jpg

    gunfitter_2008_0303_1596.jpg

    gunfitter_2008_0303_1597.jpg

    gunfitter_2008_0303_1598.jpg

    gunfitter_2008_0303_1599.jpg


    This is not much of a problem for me but if you buy wood for a future project and you don't check with a stockmaker prior to purchasing the wood you could make a costly mistake.

    The blank in question was a few hundred not a thousand dollar blank but never the less you should know that most wood that looks like this will need to be stabilized or repaired with special epoxys or glues. Many high grade blanks I glue a 1 1/8" dowel in to the through bolt hole area and strengthen the wood from the inside this way but there is an additional expense in doing it. Second when finishing such a blank the finish will not be anywhere near as quick or as few coats of finish to get a smooth surface. On a blank like this one if I chose to keep it I would be looking at probably $400-$500 in extra work to make sure that the stock were durable.

    The lesson is buy wood that is stable and free of checks when ever possible. Your stockmaker will thank you. A small crack, bark pocket or even a void won't
    necessarily hurt depending on location. To be safe check with the stockmaker you are intending to use for the job.

    Hope this help's.

    Later I'll post something on moisture content and the various types of stock wood commonly available

    Joe Goldberg
     
  2. Dougbbbb

    Dougbbbb TS Supporters TS Supporters

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2010
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    Location:
    NJ
    Joe

    You can have either one of these if you want. Where did you buy that wood I would return it.


    dougbbbb_2010_160644.jpg



    dougbbbb_2010_160645.jpg
     
  3. Cooter

    Cooter Member

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    Aug 26, 2009
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    206
    Very informative, thanks Joe.
     
  4. Charlie Becknell

    Charlie Becknell Well-Known Member

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    I have always enjoyed Joe's exhibits and craftsmanship.

    Charlie
     
  5. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    It's going back. Thanks for the offer Doug.

    Just trying to save time and money by informing the shooters before they buy wood and set it aside for years with out checking with some one that knows about wood and stockmaking first.


    Joe
     
  6. Johnny

    Johnny Well-Known Member

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    2,804
    Why does that blank have so many checks? It's normal for some fancy wood to have checks. I have a feather crotch claro blank with a few small checks but nothing like pictured. Improper curing or forced curing?
     
  7. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    Curing or just the wood. In a tree with lots of movement from wind there can be checks and cracks that you can't see until the wood is cut and dried. The flaws are there but you don't see them until the wood is dry. I suspect that the blank dried a bit too fast but more likely it was sawn when a bit green instead of leaving as a log prior to cutting up.
    Joe
     
  8. Taxidermy

    Taxidermy Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2006
    Messages:
    1,098
    If the tree grows to fast in fertile soil it will crack or check when drying. Trees that grow slow on rocky ground have best color and tight grain. IMO thanks Ronnie