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What makes a Trap Gun

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Wolf172, Jul 22, 2012.

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  1. Wolf172

    Wolf172 Member

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    Was wondering just what it is that makes a shotgun a "trap gun"? I realize that trap guns are supposed to shoot high. My 1100 Classic Trap has a monte carlo stock and it shoots about 60/40. But what about guns that have a straight stock? Is it the drop at butt or some other stock dimension that will cause the gun to shoot high when mounted? Have only been shooting trap for about 2 years....one of those with a feild (dove hunting) gun. Bought the 1100 classic trap last July and really love the game. But have many many questions. Thanks,

    David
     
  2. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    It is the height of the comb that acts like the rear sight on a rifle. the higher it raises your eye in relation to the front sight determines how high it will shoot.

    If you get an adjustable comb you can dial it in to your shooting style. HMB
     
  3. GW22

    GW22 Active Member

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    David:

    You'll get lots of info about trap gun features and be able to quantify each one properly as you gain more experience. Most of the best trap gun features nowadays simply help you gain proper gun fit without a custom stock or professional fitting (although for some shooters, these can certainly still be beneficial).

    The most important thing to remember, however, is that whatever gun you feel comfortable with and shoot well is indeed a perfectly acceptable trap gun. Many of the greatest trapshooters who ever lived shot pump guns or plain-stocked side-by-side field guns. They never heard of an adjustable comb, a high-rib, or a screw-in choke tube. And yet they broke hundreds of hand-set targets in a row using shells that would seem like garbage compared to anything we might shoot today. It is, and will always be, more about the indian than the arrow.

    Good luck with whatever gun you shoot.

    -Gary


    gw22_2008_0303140.jpg


    Notice the "invisible" raised comb on Mr. Fulford's gun. He was simply too ignorant to know that his trusty Remington was supposed to miss. It rarely did.
     
  4. Wolf172

    Wolf172 Member

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    One of the things that is confusing me is that someone has an 1100 Trap Gun for sale on this site. Pictured is one with a straight stock. Someone mentioned that he thought trap models had an m/c stock (as did I). Someone else mentioned that trap models came with both m/c and straight stocks. Was just curious if a trap model can have either a straight stock or m/c stock then what would make the one with the straight stock a trap model. Also a guy I work with was asking me the difference and I told him a trap gun will usually have an m/c stock or adjustable comb. Hoping I didnt tell him wrong. Thanks for the info guys. I appreciate it. Still learning.
     
  5. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    Years ago, a lot of trap guns where actually field guns with a monte carlo stock and less down pitch than field guns and they had nicer grain wood. Some break open guns do not have a safety as the manufacturer would say none is needed.

    I have often used a field gun with a monte carlo trap stock. I make my site picture the same as the field gun but I like the way the monte carlo feels when mounted.

    Most field guns shoot roughly 50/50, and trap guns usually shoot 60/40 and higher, some over 100% high. I personally like to touch the bottom of the target with my front bead when pulling the trigger and my trap gun patterns 60/40. Over the years specific trap guns pattern high above the point of aim. Depending how long a neck you have and eye placement usually determines if you take a straight comb trap stock or a monte carlo.

    To me a trap gun shoots straight, has the correct cast, and is very reliable. Nothing worse than using a gun that breaks down a lot for shooting trap. Use a gun that allows you to break targets consistently and is reliable regardless of how nice the wood looks.

    Beating shooters with an ugly gun burns the heck out of some shooters with expensive break opens guns. It will give you a great deal of personal satisfaction.
    Steve Balistreri
     
  6. Wolf172

    Wolf172 Member

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    LOL Steve, I used to shoot a lot of pool and took great pride in beating someone that came in with a high dollar McDermott que, with an off the rack bar que. Then I got one of those high dollar ques and understood why they had them. Want an over/under now but will probably shoot the 1100 for another year or so since it is starting to shoot where I am looking...and had the LOP changed to fit me. May even get the adjustable comb put on it. Really like the way it shoots but I am still new to this game.
     
  7. BigBadBob

    BigBadBob TS Member

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    The person pulling the trigger!!!!
     
  8. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    Wolf172:
    In the early 70's my grandmother passed away and left me a $1,000.00 inheritance. I was shooting a 870 TB at the time that cost me $165.00 new, as it had a monte carlo stock which cost $5.00 extra.

    Boxhorn gun club's owner Dick Bennett was selling new trap guns at this time by the name of Perazzi and Kreighoff for $625.00 each, you chose what gun you want.

    I purchased a Perazzi Comp 1 for $625.00. It came with .056 in choke. Each time I shot it I bloodied my cheek. The gun was to tightly choked as I could have taken a pound of metal out of the choke and it probably still would have been a full choke.

    The highest score I ever had with it was a 14. I knew nothing about gun fit as I was left handed, and the stock was cast right. I sold that gun and went back to my 870TB and have been happy ever since.

    One thing that I have to admit, some shooters who never uttered a word to me when I shot the 870 started striking up conversations when I was walking around with the Perazzi. I must have looked good to them.

    Once I sold it and started walking around with my 870, the same people looked at me as though I just crapped in my pants. I like 870's, and I take enormous pleasure when beating a guy with a P or a K gun.

    Truthfully, the last time I beat anybody was when the Braves were still here in Milwaukee, but that's beside the point.
    Steve
     
  9. mette56

    mette56 Well-Known Member

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    To answer your question, a MC stock vs. straight stock has nothing to do with whether it is a trap stock or not. Yes, a trap stock can be either straight or MC. Remember the MC portion is behind where your face will contact the stock. Therefore, the only result the MC creates is that it places the butt a little lower on your shoulder. It is the comb height vs. the sighting plane that makes it a trap stock which results in a higher point of impact for a rising trap target.

    Good luck,

    milt
     
  10. Beretta687EELL

    Beretta687EELL Well-Known Member

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    In the olden days of fixed chokes, they had tighter chokes than most to shoot handicap. They shoot higher POI (point of impact) than other shotguns. The stock may be straight or M/C, but they are parallel to the rib. However, they might be just the gun they shoot trap with (LOL). Bill Malcolm
     
  11. ljutic73

    ljutic73 Well-Known Member

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    I knew a guy who had sent his new BT-99 away for a release and in it's place he used an 870 Magnum field gun with a Timney release and a high comb built from duct tape and mole skin. I watched him murder 199 singles targets with it one day.
     
  12. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Wolf172, quote: <i>"One of the things that is confusing me is that someone has an 1100 Trap Gun for sale on this site. Pictured is one with a straight stock. Someone mentioned that he thought trap models had an m/c stock (as did I). Someone else mentioned that trap models came with both m/c and straight stocks. Was just curious if a trap model can have either a straight stock or m/c stock then what would make the one with the straight stock a trap model....."</i>

    Believe it or not, the comb height on the Remington 870/1100/1187 straight comb trap stocks is exactly at the same height as the monte carlo trap stocks.

    It's an optical illusion that the monte carlo appears to be higher.

    The real difference in these stocks is the butt. The straight comb has no drop, while the monte carlo does.

    The straight comb works better for people with shorter necks.

    The monte carlo works better for people with longer necks.
     
  13. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    The shooter!
     
  14. wingmaster78

    wingmaster78 Active Member

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    I agree with BigBadBod and StlFlyn.

    It's the guy pulling the trigger, Nothing else.

    You can take any shotgun that discharges a shell and break targets with it.
     
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