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What lube for internals of break open???

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Dan S., May 20, 2007.

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  1. Dan S.

    Dan S. TS Member

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    What do you folks (especially gunsmiths) recommend as a good lube for the internals of a break open shotgun? I generally don't want to open the works any more than necessary and am wondering what is a good lube for the trigger assembly, hammer pivots, selector, etc. This is a Browning. Some say grease is too heavy and will thicken in winter and may cause misfires. Others say oil is too thin for summer use unless you open it up frequently. (like after every weekend shoot). What say the pro's?
     
  2. Jennifer

    Jennifer Member

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    No gunsmith here, but I like Synco Super Lube with PTFE (the grease in tube form). I've been using it on my Beretta 682 Gold E combo since I bought it new in '04 and have no galling or significant wear marks. Shooters Emporium recommends it for their Soft Touch and that's how I heard about it. What's nice is you can usually find it at auto parts stores. See link above. I cut and pasted some info below:

    "What is special about SYNCOLON® (PTFE)?
    Super Lube Grease and Super Lube Oil with SYNCOLON® (PTFE) contain Polytetrafluoroethylene(PTFE) and is the most slippery surface (lowest coefficient of friction) known to man. The SYNCOLON® (PTFE) particles in Super Lube fill surface irregularities of mating parts and are compacted like snowflakes in a snowball to form a smooth, lubricated surface.

    SYNCOLON® (PTFE) provides improved anti-wear properties, is waterproof, not washed away by acids or alkalis, and resists temperatures to 750°F. The SYNCOLON® (PTFE) particles in Super Lube's unique patented formula are held in constant suspension ensuring they will always be evenly applied to the lubricated surface."

    Probably much more than you asked for, LOL...

    Jennifer
     
  3. Jennifer

    Jennifer Member

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    MasterBlaster I misread your question, I thought it was for the action, not the internal parts. Nevermind!!!

    Jennifer
     
  4. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Break Free. Or LPS-1 if it's around. That has to be only a once a year thing, if that. I need another excuse to take off a stock, and then I give it a light spray before reassembly.

    HM
     
  5. fssberson

    fssberson Active Member

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    Break Free for internal springs, trigger, etc. K80 Glide is excellent for hinge pins and parts that rub on one another. Every other time wipe off and re-apply. Fred
     
  6. raptor1956

    raptor1956 TS Member

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    tri-flow
     
  7. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Any good grease will work well. Gun parts are not subjected to high levels of stress or wide temperature ranges. Keeping the parts clean is important, the type of grease applied to the clean surfaces is not real important.

    MasterBlaster- I would not be very impressed with the opinion of a gunsmith unless the person also had some credentials as a petroleum engineer. If you go to Wall Mart and buy a large tube of white grease and a caulk gun, you should be in good shape for around the next 50 years.

    Pat Ireland
     
  8. Baron23

    Baron23 Well-Known Member

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    For the trigger assembly, etc you definitely do NOT want to put grease in there. First flush well the trigger group/et al with a good solvent spray (brake cleaner, Birchwood Casey Gun Scrubber is my favorite) then blow with compressed air to get all remaining crud and solvent off. If you don't have a air compressor, buy some canned air...they sell it at any CompUSA or similar venue.

    Then spray with any light gun oil, then blow all excess off again with compressed air. What remains is a very light coating of oil which is all you want on these internal parts.

    Its like making a dry Martini...add vermouth to the glass, swirl around, then throw it out. What remains clinging to the glass is the perfect amount of vermouth. Oh, drink Martini after cleaning gun, this will ensure it gets put back together right :) LOL
     
  9. Baron23

    Baron23 Well-Known Member

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    For the trigger assembly, etc you definitely do NOT want to put grease in there. First flush well the trigger group/et al with a good solvent spray (brake cleaner, Birchwood Casey Gun Scrubber is my favorite) then blow with compressed air to get all remaining crud and solvent off. If you don't have a air compressor, buy some canned air...they sell it at any CompUSA or similar venue.

    Then spray with any light gun oil, then blow all excess off again with compressed air. What remains is a very light coating of oil which is all you want on these internal parts.

    Its like making a dry Martini...add vermouth to the glass, swirl around, then throw it out. What remains clinging to the glass is the perfect amount of vermouth. Oh, drink Martini after cleaning gun, this will ensure it gets put back together right :) LOL
     
  10. jester-the-molester

    jester-the-molester TS Member

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    Another vote here for Synco Super Lube.
     
  11. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    Yet another vote for Synco Super Lube grease for wear points. I use Synco's light synthetic oil with PTFE for the trigger and internals. I like it a lot.

    Baron23, careful with that compressed air. I once blew a pin out of my Beretta trigger group and the whole thing went sproing. Took a while to find all those little parts and springs.

    BTW Baron23, that's waaaaaay too much Vermouth left in the glass.
     
  12. Dan S.

    Dan S. TS Member

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    Pat Ireland...point taken. However, as a machinist I don't need a degree to see what cutting oils work and what doesn't. I _see_ the results. That was what I was referring to in general for the gunsmith viewpoint. And as far as that goes, I've met a few degree'd people......Oh don't get me started. LOL Thanks for the note.
     
  13. BMC

    BMC Member

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    Trailer axle bearing grease on the hinge points, Break Free for the guts.
     
  14. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    FYI - SuperLube is now called ViperLube.
     
  15. bigclown

    bigclown TS Member

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    For external parts...hinge pins, etc. Browning Service Center at last year's Grand said to use Lithium grease. I asked where to find it...they said WalMart or any auto parts or hardware store. For internal parts...the experts on TS.com saying a very light coat of oil sounds correct. Best Regards, Ed
     
  16. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

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    With my new Beretta 687 was included a little bottle of "Beretta ->Olio per Armi----Gun Oil, +Teflon". It's not a grease but is a little thicker than the usual gun oil and I really like it!

    Anybody recommend something that is similar to this stuff but more readily available, something any well stocked sporting goods store might stock?

    John C. Saubak
     
  17. waverider

    waverider Well-Known Member

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    Old Cowboy,

    When I first got my 682, a guy at Beretta suggested Break Free CLP after I complained that getting Beretta oil was not easy to get where I am.

    The old manual suggested that after the "season" soak the action in Kerosene then shake or blow dry with compressed air. Then spray the action with Beretta oil, shake or blow dry.

    Jason
     
  18. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    MasterBlaster- I have no doubt that you can tell how well a cutting oil is working when you are cutting metal. When I was hand engraving or hand cutting threads, I liked kerosene. For general gun lubrication, we simply need a grease with some lubricity and adhesiveness over a rather narrow range of temperatures. Just about any of them will work well. I strongly believe that keeping the lubricant clean is much more important than the type of lubricant.

    Baron23- Your general statement about no grease in the trigger assembly suggests that I should not put a small dab of grease on the selector axle and release hooks of my K-80. I, all gunsmiths I know and the factory disagree with your conclusion.

    Pat Ireland
     
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