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WHAT IS YOUR OPINION????

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by capnrico, Apr 3, 2008.

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  1. capnrico

    capnrico TS Member

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    I am looking for honest answers and opinions.

    On a separate thread there has been disagreement over the term “in battery” used in the description of a target that is loaded, in ready position to be launched by a trap machine.

    Is this incorrect or a bad description?

    Is it an accurate or fare term?

    Or what term or word would you call it?

    Answers would be more than welcome from someone with military experience.

    All answers will be counted.

    Eric
     
  2. setter

    setter Member

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    I'll go first if you'll protect me from the flak! Nothing wrong with the use of the term and your trap manual referenced it, as I recall from the other thread. I think we are also aware that "in battery" or other references to the position of the trap or clay target are not referenced in the ATA rule book regarding the layout of the field..
     
  3. capnrico

    capnrico TS Member

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    Sure! I'll defend an honest answer! That's all I'm after.

    By the way. The manual and rule book did not use it another poster did. To me it sounded proper.
     
  4. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    "In battery, projecting, as a gun, into an embrasure or over a parapet in readiness for firing." This from Dictionary.com - a fast lookup. Seems reasonable to borrow the term for a target thrower "ready to fire" however, I'd guess it should refer to the machine rather than the clay bird that WILL be thrown from the machine. Id est, can a gun (machine) be "in battery" without having a charge ready to discharge (throw)? I go with it's a fair term....Bob Dodd
     
  5. Neil Winston

    Neil Winston Well-Known Member

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    To newcomers: you really should click the link above to get an idea where this nonsense thread comes from. You may never had heard "in battery" except from poseurs and (borderline) nimrods, but nonetheless we may owe capn a perusal of his thoughts, if only to try to dope out what the blazes he's talking about.

    To Capnrico: You have already heard my answer.

    For background, capnrico wants to use the word "in battery" as some sort of entry into "targetspeak," a word, though not in the ATA rulebook he somehow apparently thinks "should be there" if only the writers of the ATA rulebook read more of "Sporting Clays" magazine and similar cutting edge publications, which, if you want to know what's current in shooting vests is exactly where you should go, if you are into that sort of thing.

    The question here is simple. CR bought a Outers trap which may or may not have told him something about trap placement. I have already clued him into the fact that if Outers says something contrary to the rulebook, it is they that have to clean up their act, not we. He apparently nevertheless thinks that the ATA rulebook should accede to his - and Outers? - demands that his understanding of what it may or may not say - who knows until he posts it - should somehow influence how people should position the spot where they set their pole to determine the height of targets.

    Put me down as a "no."

    Neil
     
  6. capnrico

    capnrico TS Member

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    Neil,

    You are muckin’ up my thread.

    I made no directional reference to the previous thread or you as to get unbiased opinions.

    I am looking for honest opinions not editorials. This seems to dismay you.

    Nor did I imply that terminology or wording be changed in any rule book.

    Nor did I claim to have read the term in an Outer’s manual.

    Your last paragraph is totally baseless!

    You too, seem to have comprehension issues.

    I am drawing a line under your post and designating it’s position as “Round 1” and your vote is counted.
     
  7. Mr Newbius©

    Mr Newbius© TS Member

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    My opinion is whatever opinion Mr Winston, Mr Ireland or Ivanhoe says I should have.
     
  8. capnrico

    capnrico TS Member

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    Duly noted. You have a two-thirds "No" vote at this time.

    This could get interesting on my spreadsheet. You may wind up with a split personality!

    “Film at 11:00!”
     
  9. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    Once dropped onto the throwing arm, it's a henweigh-X.
     
  10. Neil Winston

    Neil Winston Well-Known Member

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    Hap, this is serious stuff, nothing to joke around about.

    Neil
     
  11. Mr Newbius©

    Mr Newbius© TS Member

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    It's only serious if somebody says it serious so we must all now be serious since Neil said that this is serious stuff.
     
  12. Neil Winston

    Neil Winston Well-Known Member

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    Woosh! Another bit of irony streaks over Mr. ®'s head.

    Neil
     
  13. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Well, Eddie makes a very good point without saying it. In our little society, "In battery" is used to describe a shotgun with the bolt closed and locked as if ready to fire - even without a shell as I hinted at above. I'd stretch it further and suggest that's true in the entire gunsmith community too. That being fine tuned in our usage, I would have to revisit my vote for "fair term" as simply not something I'd expect to see in the clay target world. Short of super delegates changing my mind again, causing a Florida re-vote, I'll switch to NO!.....Bob Dodd
     
  14. Mr Newbius©

    Mr Newbius© TS Member

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    Neil, I would say something impotent but it would only be wasted upon this serious thread.
     
  15. Trap2

    Trap2 Well-Known Member

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    Eric..... As a fair trap mechanic, and having been instructed over the years, rather informally, by one of the best in the business, Roger Covelski, former owner of QRP, the term "In Battery", as it relates to trap shooting, refers to when the arm of the trap comes around and rests on the trigger mechanism, under full spring tension, ready to be fired. We always call the position of the ARM, at that time, as in Battery. It has nothing to do with having a target on the plate. It strictly refers to the trap arm in a cocked position.... Just my experience.... Dan Thome (Trap2)
     
  16. capnrico

    capnrico TS Member

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    Bob, Too late. Your ballet was already in the box and I don't count chads.
     
  17. Onceabum

    Onceabum TS Member

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    My opinion is: "Who the hell cares?"
     
  18. setter

    setter Member

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    <a href="http://s248.photobucket.com/albums/gg171/jmoody1432/?action=view¤t=2284c6b2.jpg" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a>

    Please put these two down for definite maybes!!!!! I would have preferred a picture of the chick on a battery but couldn't get'em to hold still.
     
  19. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Now, see; Dan comes along and gives us the facts. So, "In battery" relating to a trap machine is common in the fraternity of machine experts for the time when the machine is cocked and ready to fire so I'm still willing to say it's fair as it relates to the machine but has nothing to do with the bird any more than the term requires the gun to be loaded as I hinted at originally. Then again, who cares makes a ton of sense too!....Bob Dodd
     
  20. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    The term in battery is clearly not appropriate. The term battery refers to a group or related things. Omitting the obvious electrical use of the term, following are correct usages of the term "battery". Of course is a line of traps all had a target ready to throw, the line of traps could be called a battery.

    2. any large group or series of related things: a battery of questions.
    3. Military. a. two or more pieces of artillery used for combined action.
    b. a tactical unit of artillery, usually consisting of six guns together with the artillerymen, equipment, etc., required to operate them.
    c. a parapet or fortification equipped with artillery.

    4. a group or series of similar articles, machines, parts, etc.
    5. Baseball. the pitcher and catcher considered as a unit.
    6. Navy. a. (on a warship) a group of guns having the same caliber or used for the same purpose.
    b. the whole armament of a warship.

    7. Psychology. a series of tests yielding a single total score, used for measuring aptitude, intelligence, personality, etc.
    8. the act of beating or battering.
    9. Law. an unlawful attack upon another person by beating or wounding, or by touching in an offensive manner.
    10. an instrument used in battering.
    11. Also, batterie. Music. the instruments comprising the percussion section of an orchestra.
    12. any imposing group of persons or things acting or directed in unison: a battery of experts.

    Pat Ireland
     
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